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  1. #1
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    Mongoose Blackcomb - What rear shock to buy?

    HI, I have a Mongoose Blackcomb. I want to replace the rear shock with a better one with adjustable rebound. Which one would be a good replacement for around $50

    My Stock shock specs: Lu Jin LJ-400B, 750 lbs/in. 5-7/8" Bolt spacing, 1.25" travel.

    I read that the Rockshox Coupe Deluxe fits. But, I can't find it forsale anywhere on the web??

    Last edited by Scotta46; 09-14-2010 at 04:37 PM.

  2. #2
    Big Gulps, Alright!
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    You won't find one for less than $50.

  3. #3
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    Ride it until it breaks, then upgrade the whole bike.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119
    Ride it until it breaks, then upgrade the whole bike.
    I second that
    That's what I plan to do with my good old Haro V1.
    It's not about what bike you ride, but how hard you tear it up

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119
    Ride it until it breaks, then upgrade the whole bike.
    Word. OP, you'd be throwing money away. Put that $50 towards a nicer bike.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotta46
    HI, I have a Mongoose Blackcomb. I want to replace the rear shock with a better one with adjustable rebound. Which one would be a good replacement for around $50

    My Stock shock specs: Lu Jin LJ-400B, 750 lbs/in. 5-7/8" Bolt spacing, 1.25" travel.

    I read that the Rockshox Coupe Deluxe fits. But, I can't find it forsale anywhere on the web??
    A Yasusu shock is the one I was going to get for my Blackcomb. In the end I bought a more expensive bike, so the Blackcomb got sold.

    It is on sale on Ebay for $83 delivered (assuming it gets through Customs with no duty). It has rebound damping. That price includes aluminum bushings, so that saves you approx $20 for a bushing kit when compared to other options. The sale price ($83) gets posted every few days.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Bicycle-Rebound-...05768570016093

    if this link is not working, search ebay for "Bicycle Rebound Adjustable Rear Shock 800LB 6.5 * 1.5" or locate the seller "i-sports-tw" and search the seller's store for "shock".

    They make the shock and the bushings to order. You'll need to specify the shock and bushings in metric. I measured them up as (the letter designators are the dimension per the photos in the ebay advert):

    W (bottom) = 24mm (width lower mount)

    W (top) = 50 mm (width upper mount)

    d = 8 mm (diameter of mounting bolt, both top and bottom - they're M8)

    l = 155 mm (eye to eye length)
    ([I]Note - that is about 5mm more than you measured - I checked it quite a few times, including with the shock out of the frame. Did you unweight the shock completely?[/I])

    travel = 38 mm
    (note - you might not get the full 38mm of travel - it might be only 28mm since the shock is 10mm shorter overall, eye-to-eye, than their standard 165 x 38 size).

    I suggest that you get the 800 lb spring which is just a bit more heavy than the 750 lb one on the stock Blackcomb shock.

    Yassusu have a shock catalogue ("DM for Bike") and measurement and setup instructions for download here:

    http://www.yasusu.com/ser.htm

    Here's some info here on MTBR (including a thread that I posted earlier) and some user perspectives on Yasusu shocks:

    YASUSU shock???

    Yasusu anyone?

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...63292#poststop
    Note - I got the eye-to-eye measurement wrong (165 mm) in this thread - it is actually 155 mm

    http://forums.mtbr.com/shocks-suspension/help-noob-pick-right-fork-please-633802.html#post7102481

    I didn't actually get this shock. I had all the info together and was ready to pull the trigger when I got a killer deal on a Giant Trance instead. But if it was me, then this is the shock that I'd go for. They seem to be well made, Yasusu appear to have a credible background (motorcycle shocks) and other folk here give them good reviews.

    Note also that I e-mailed both Yasusu (with a technical query) and the ebay seller and this revealed that the ebay seller is a Taiwanese agent, selling the shocks on behalf of Yasusu. Therefore, if you place an order you will need to be very clear with your dimensions since English is not their first language and they are not intimate with the shocks. I was asking questions about the disparities between info in Yasusu's catalogue and the ebay advert for this shock and they ultimately admitted that their ebay advert was wrong. The catalogue was correct. Ebay lists it as a BNCP 501, when it actually is a BRNP 501. Their ID convention is:

    B= Bike
    N = No rebound adjust / R = Rebound Adjust
    C = Compression adjust / N = No compression adjust
    P = Preload adjust

    Some thoughts on other shocks listed in their catalogue:


    You could go for another Yasusu one with compression adjustment and lockout.

    BNCP 201 would fit. But no rebound adjustement and those external lines to the reservoir on their adjustable compression shocks would be vunerable on the Blackcomb's exposed mounting position.

    BRCP 101 and BRCP 102 would fit and have both rebound and compression. However, those external lines again ... damage that line and the shock is stuffed.

    I don't think that the BNCP 401 will fit - the top head is too large for and would foul the frame at the the Blackcomb's top shock mount. Also it has no rebound damping control.

    The BRCP 601 is too long at minimum 175 mm eye to eye. BK-7 is also too long. (these were the ones that I really wanted because they have had both rebound and compression adjustments without the external line)

    The BNNP 301 would fit and is a bit cheaper (not offered on ebay very often) but it has no rebound adjustment.

    So the BRNP 501 appears to be the best option.

    Happy hunting! Let us know what you ultimately decide to do.


    (Note - I am not affiliated to Yasusu, I just happen to thinks that they probably make a good product. I'm an engineer, so I appreciated their technical data, they even post it in their e-bay advert ...)

    P.S. The stock Blackcomb shock is very low-grade and is definately the weak point on the bike. If you are going to stick with your Blackcomb for a while then the shock is definately worth upgrading.

    Other things that may be worth upgrading are:

    Seatpost: stock Blackcomb item is Kalloy 30.0mm x 300mm. It is a very weak single bolt clamp design that is prone to movement and flogging out, especially if you are a heavier rider. I'd replace it with a dual bolt design (the Easton EA-30 is available in this hard to find size and is currently on sale for $15 at JensenUSA),

    Front brake. The Promax is fine for what it is (and once set up properly, performs surprisingly well). But for around $35 on Amazon, you can get an Avid BB5 that will work with the existing mechanical brake lever & cable and should give you even more powerful braking. I'd keep the Promax on the rear and hold on to your removed Promax from the front (as a spare).

    So for less than $150 you can make the Blackcomb better. It's still not going to be a serious off-road bike, but it will give you lots of fun and enable you to decide whether you want to get more into the sport. I have no regrets about having been a Blackcomb owner.
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    Last edited by Ulairi; 10-17-2010 at 06:43 PM.

  7. #7
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    No good My cool bike

    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119
    Ride it until it breaks, then upgrade the whole bike.

    Why is this always the answer for a bike that isn't "cool," or "name brand?" I, as you have guessed by now own a Blackcomb.

    Is there something wrong with purchasing a bike in your price range and getting some upgraded parts as you go along? Once you have come to love the sport enough and have saved, made, enough to purchase a higher quality bike, you may not have to buy all of the parts because you have some you can remove from you "trainer" bike that you all ready know work for you.

    As you are on this adventure of learning trail etiquette, bike maintenance, what parts do and do not work, and what your physical and mental limits are isn't it a little bit better to do it cheaply and enjoy the sport than have the coolest stickers on your bike.

    Someone please correct me if I am wrong, but I do believe that unless you do this for a living, it is supposed to be done for the enjoyment of the outdoors, thrill of completing something that may have been physically impossible last time out, riding with friends and just generally keeping in shape so that you do not become an internet rider.
    I am not worn out, I am just taking my bike for a walk!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bentcog
    Why is this always the answer for a bike that isn't "cool," or "name brand?"
    This again?

    Maybe it's always the answer...because it's correct? You won't get your money back from upgrades, generally a nicer bike will come with better components, and you run the risk of incompatibility. It's much smarter and will save you a lot of money to simply save your money instead of upgrading, and buy a better bike.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bentcog
    Why is this always the answer for a bike that isn't "cool," or "name brand?" I, as you have guessed by now own a Blackcomb.

    Is there something wrong with purchasing a bike in your price range and getting some upgraded parts as you go along? Once you have come to love the sport enough and have saved, made, enough to purchase a higher quality bike, you may not have to buy all of the parts because you have some you can remove from you "trainer" bike that you all ready know work for you.

    As you are on this adventure of learning trail etiquette, bike maintenance, what parts do and do not work, and what your physical and mental limits are isn't it a little bit better to do it cheaply and enjoy the sport than have the coolest stickers on your bike.

    Someone please correct me if I am wrong, but I do believe that unless you do this for a living, it is supposed to be done for the enjoyment of the outdoors, thrill of completing something that may have been physically impossible last time out, riding with friends and just generally keeping in shape so that you do not become an internet rider.
    The reason people that have more experience then you say to upgrade a whole bike rather then a part on a bike like a blackcomb is because we have been down that road, and know that cheap bikes are not worth upgrading. What we try to tell people is that the money spent on a bike, such as the blackcomb, can be spent on a much better begginer bike, that has a good frame that that does not weigh a ton. Having a $350 hardtail mountain bike from a bike shop would provide the user with a much more quality ride then the most expensive bike sold at walmart. Ride your blackcomb and have fun. I'm happy that you are getting into such a fun sport. If you want to upgrade it, go ahead. But before you spend a few hundred dollars on upgrades, stop in a local bike shop and ride a bike that is in your price range, just to see the difference.

  10. #10
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    Do not drop a single penny on that bike
    Honestly... ahh I give up

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    Bad mechanic and mullen119, thanks for you honest and clear answers. I agree, I would like to save for a better over all bike. I guess the upgrades I am talking about would be more universal like tires, grips, Rome and some things like that. Obviously with the from forks, rear shocks and other items like that, you would have to be careful as has been noted.

    Highdelll, it is answers like that I am referring too. Come-on man, I know I have like 7 posts and you have a million, but I was asking an honest question. I was kinda hoping for honest answers seeing as how my complaint, comment, and question was why people default to that response.

    I have been a mechanic of many types for awhile now. I know the importance of parts that will last. I just don't see where just cause it has a fancy name, logo, sticker, color or shape makes it superior. I want hard facts. That is why I am here. I can't afford the bike I want, as you may have guessed by now as well. But, as was said, I am having fun. So, bad much and mullen119, thanks for your comments, help and clarification. As soon as I am done going to college for being an Architect, I will purchase a higher quality bike with higher quality parts and hopefully, be in more shape to ride a little harder that I AK now at 31!!
    I am not worn out, I am just taking my bike for a walk!

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    It's Highdell. You'll understand once you've been here for a while.

    The only components you should upgrade on a bike like that are the tires, grips, and seat, as those will transfer, and cheap, and will make a huge difference in the ride-ability and comfort of the bike.

    It's not the name, logo, sticker, color, or shape which makes a bike superior. It's the superior quality, design, weight, and strength. However, by now we now which marks believer those and which don't. Think about it, there's a reason Trek, Specialized, etc. have the reputation they have.

  13. #13
    Big Gulps, Alright!
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    Quote Originally Posted by bentcog
    Bad mechanic and mullen119, thanks for you honest and clear answers. I agree, I would like to save for a better over all bike. I guess the upgrades I am talking about would be more universal like tires, grips, Rome and some things like that. Obviously with the from forks, rear shocks and other items like that, you would have to be careful as has been noted.

    Highdelll, it is answers like that I am referring too. Come-on man, I know I have like 7 posts and you have a million, but I was asking an honest question. I was kinda hoping for honest answers seeing as how my complaint, comment, and question was why people default to that response.

    I have been a mechanic of many types for awhile now. I know the importance of parts that will last. I just don't see where just cause it has a fancy name, logo, sticker, color or shape makes it superior. I want hard facts. That is why I am here. I can't afford the bike I want, as you may have guessed by now as well. But, as was said, I am having fun. So, bad much and mullen119, thanks for your comments, help and clarification. As soon as I am done going to college for being an Architect, I will purchase a higher quality bike with higher quality parts and hopefully, be in more shape to ride a little harder that I AK now at 31!!
    Fair enough. I have some free time, so I'll indulge. First off, department store frames are made from cheaper materials than nicer bikes. They have to be cheap to sell (<$400), so gobs of money doesn't go into R&D. Frames are made of lower quality aluminum, or steel in many cases. The design of these bikes does not account for serious off-road use. Most of them are pavement princesses and the folks that design them know this.

    There's no posted geometry, so hard to say how it compares in that aspect, but the suspension designs on these are rudimentary at best. To build an FS bike for less than a thousand bucks you have, you have to cut corners somewhere and the suspension reflects that. For one, the materials are of a lower quality - I frequently work on bikes with shot bushings and suspension pivots, for which parts are virtually non-existent. The shock is a basic coil spring, really. I've yet to see a dep't store bike equipped with rebound adjustment, and they only come with one universal spring rate - if your weight doesn't match up, you're looking at spending another $20-40 on a proper weight spring, assuming you can find one. Same goes for the forks they stick on those things.

    On that note, it's also worth noting dep't store bikes don't come in sizes. One size fits all, so if you're not the right height, you'll be a riding a bike that doesn't fit you. Most people ride them with the seats far too low anyway, but riding an incorrectly sized bike puts all sorts of strain on your body and makes it uncomfortable.

    To boot, they're assembled by goons who are rewarded for how fast they can build bikes, not how well. Forks installed backwards, bolts not tightened, etc. You basically need to have the thing tuned up right off the showroom to ensure it's been built properly.

    EDIT: The shock placement is especially bad on the Blackcomb, where mud, dirt and grime kicked up by the front wheel slather it with crud.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    It's Highdell. You'll understand once you've been here for a while.

    The only components you should upgrade on a bike like that are the tires, grips, and seat, as those will transfer, and cheap, and will make a huge difference in the ride-ability and comfort of the bike.

    It's not the name, logo, sticker, color, or shape which makes a bike superior. It's the superior quality, design, weight, and strength. However, by now we now which marks believer those and which don't. Think about it, there's a reason Trek, Specialized, etc. have the reputation they have.
    Well, yeah, I joke around a bit.
    But I wasn't jokin about spending $$ on the bike.
    I would hope people figure that buying tires, grips, saddles, oil, grease, pedals, bells, baskets... is NOT spending $ on the bike - it's for yourself.

    Do not spend another penny on that bike...That's Me - Highdelll
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by svmike
    Word. OP, you'd be throwing money away. Put that $50 towards a nicer bike.
    QFT
    nothing in life is real, so if anything goes wrong, blame the dead guy

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    Thanks guys for the tips and clearing up some more things.

    Highdell(l), thanks for clearing up your post, and your reasoning behind your response. I really appreciate the extra effort.

    I will keep riding the Mongoose until I can upgrade the bike as a whole. When this does happen, I will make sure to ask the pros that are on here. They may not be the right questions, but I will try.
    I am not worn out, I am just taking my bike for a walk!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bentcog
    Thanks guys for the tips and clearing up some more things.

    Highdell(l), thanks for clearing up your post, and your reasoning behind your response. I really appreciate the extra effort.

    I will keep riding the Mongoose until I can upgrade the bike as a whole. When this does happen, I will make sure to ask the pros that are on here. They may not be the right questions, but I will try.
    No such thing as a stupid question. Well, almost no such thing.

    I ride a Mongoose as well. Mongoose does make some really nice bikes, just not the ones at wally world. Use the forums to learn and have fun riding. When it comes time to buy a new bike, you will know what to look for

  18. #18
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    I'm posting here because there is no review page for the Blackcomb on MTBR.

    As an ex-Blackcomb owner, I have some thoughts on the merits of the Blackcomb. With the Blackcomb, you certainly get what you pay for. Nonetheless, it does have a legitimate niche in the biking spectrum. Here's a few observations (starting at the front and working back):

    Wheel rims are 'single wall' and will probably buckle from a big hit,

    The fork is limited in travel (75mm) and has no real adjustment (the spring ‘preload’ has negligible effect).

    The Promax disc brakes are surprisingly good, when set up properly. They have good modulation and feel and can really pull you up quick. However, the are apparently prone to fade over long down hill sections.

    Water bottle position is not good - the front wheel hits the bottle when the fork compresses. You need to get a handle bar or seat mount for your water bottle .

    The shifters (trigger shifters and Shimano derailleurs) are very good and shift crisply when they are well set up.

    Gearing is good. The 3rd ring has 48 teeth so high gear is good for paved surfaces. Low gear is adequate for most casual off-road rides.

    Rear suspension is a very bouncy 4 bar design. You'll lose a lot of energy in pedal induced suspension bob.

    The shock is very low grade (similar to other dept. store bike rear shocks). The 750 lb spring is okay for most adults (up to around 200lbs weight). After a bit of use, the shock does not dampen very well (take it out and compress and extend it by hand to see what I mean). The shock is in a silly position – its gets muck on the shaft (which will wear seals out very quickly).

    Suspension pivots are plastic bushes. They will wear out over time and the rear suspension will suffer from flex and movement.

    The seatpost is low grade (Kalloy 30.0mm x 300mm). It is a very weak single bolt clamp design that is prone to movement and flogging out, especially if you are a heavier rider (over about 180 lbs - I weigh 180 and the seatpost was okay for me but another one has bent for a heavier friend). The lower rail cups bend (the lower piece of the clamp is only pressed steel) and the seat starts to move in the clamp.

    The tires are cheap Kendas but are actually rather a good compromise between road and light trail use.

    The head angle is tight and this gives the bike very nimble & responsive handling, at the expense of being skittery in a straight line if the surface is uneven.

    The frame size is approximately a medium and suits someone up to about 5’ 11” in height.

    The bike is quite heavy. The rear suspension arms are steel.
    In summary - the Blackcomb is not a serious off-road bike. It will not take rough treatment very well and those plastic bushes will flog out over time. However, if your use is mainly on-road with the occassional bit of trail riding then this bike will serve you well.

    For more off-road oriented use, it is a viable starter bike. It will give you lots of fun as you master the basics and decide whether you want to get more into the sport. It will also educate you about what you might want to look for in your next bike. However, as you get better, you will very quickly encounter the limitiations of the Blackcomb's design (especially the suspension). Also, it is unlikey to last long if you are going off-road frequently.

    I sold mine for what I paid for it and had 6 months of good use out of it. Can't complain about that ...
    Last edited by Ulairi; 10-18-2010 at 07:14 AM.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by B@dKarma
    QFT
    QFT = Quite F*#king True?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by svmike
    QFT = Quite F*#king True?
    fits ... But, "quoted for truth"
    Honestly... ahh I give up

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