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  1. #1
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    Reputation: reklaw707's Avatar
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    MCU elastomer + coil?

    I am little new to this, but have been checking the forums as far as basic beginner knowledge and what not, and this site is excellent. I switched to avid 7 cable discs based on some of the information given by some of the guys here and is easily the best thing I could have done. Changed everything. My question: I was wondering if anyone knew the basics of how an "mcu elostomer + coil" type shock operated, as opposed to air or oil? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Reputation: standard235's Avatar
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    there's a coil with an elastomer. The elastomer "prevents" harsh bottoming.

    As far as I know....


    POGO STICK

  3. #3
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    Okay, MCU/Coil forks operate just like any....

    other fork. The only difference is that they use a shorter spring, usually on the bottom, then an small adapter and a section of MCU elastomer on top of that for a "spring stack". The coil compresses first and then as the fork gets further into the travel the elastomer starts to compress. Years ago, 90 to 95% of the forks on the market used coil/mcu stacks for their springs. The idea is that the MCU because of it's nature, compresses and rebounds slower than a steel coil spring, giving a damping affect to the spring stack. Back then most forks didn't have oil damping of any kind. So the mcu helped in that respect. As oil dampers became more common, reliable, and efficient, it became possible to use full coil spirngs or air springs and keep them under control with the damper, also manufacturers started to use top out springs or bumpers which eliminated the harsh top out that used to come with the use of full coil or air forks. So as fork technology advanced the MCU/coil stack fell out of favor, and today is only found on the very lowest end, or low tech forks.

    Bottom line, the MCU is used to give the spring some progressiveness at the end of the travel stroke to help prevent harsh bottom out, and to slow the rebound to help prevent harsh top out. It basically acts like a damper and asists the spring. They have basically become rare due to the better performance of oil damping systems, the better performace of air forks, and the smoothness of full coil forks. These improvements have pretty much made the old mcu/coil stack obsolete. But they do still work, as long as you can find mcu elastomers and coil springs for those forks that allow you to adjust for your weight etc.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  4. #4
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    Reputation: reklaw707's Avatar
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    I have that now and was wanting to stay the hell away from it in the future when changing forks. Was just making sure the newer spring forks did NOT work like this.
    Thanks for the help.

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