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  1. #251
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    Ok, my forks were topping out. So I sent them back to the distributor to sort. Yes I was honest that there was a shim stack in there (I wasn't going to lie). Anyway the TST2 cart is apperently 'gone' (broken). I just thought the oil had migrated and/or it'd hydrolocked.

    Anyway they wanted (UK) £180 (circa $300) to replace the cart. No way.

    They said they can't repair it, must be replaced. Thoughts?

  2. #252
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    Helps a lot! thanks

  3. #253
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    If you need a new cart sounds like a good time to pop an RC3 in there.

    A bit more to spend though...

    Quote Originally Posted by Horacek View Post
    Ok, my forks were topping out. So I sent them back to the distributor to sort. Yes I was honest that there was a shim stack in there (I wasn't going to lie). Anyway the TST2 cart is apperently 'gone' (broken). I just thought the oil had migrated and/or it'd hydrolocked.

    Anyway they wanted (UK) £180 (circa $300) to replace the cart. No way.

    They said they can't repair it, must be replaced. Thoughts?
    Likes Bikes

  4. #254
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    I recently aquired a 08-09 55 tst2 on the cheap that needed some TLC and have placed a shim stack in place of the old washers. On re-assembling the cartridge I noticed a strange issue. The compression cartridge cap that would normally thread into the top of the cartridge housing has no threads ... the outer body has threads present on the inside of the tube but I dont see any on the assembly cap. Anyone ran into this issue or is it supposed to be like that?

    I reassembled anyway, and the fluid seems to create a seal and while cycling the fork the assembly seems to stay together. I'd like to think its made that way but I feel that isn't the case. (On the positive note, the fork feels great.)

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by Cougar797; 04-08-2013 at 12:05 PM.

  5. #255
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    @Cougar, can you take a picture, because that sounds weird!

  6. #256
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    I looked harder again and found that the top of the cart body had sheared off and is simply attached to the upper assembly.

    Marzocchi 55 TST2 conversion to shim damping: step by step-tst2-cart.jpg

    This being said, do any of you tinkerers out there have a spare cart body laying around?

  7. #257
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    Hi guys ! I just bought a used devinci remix 2009. Came with a 44 tst2, 140 mm. I'd like to do the mod but I first contacted Rob Page at marzocchi about a few questions about this mod. He told me right away that I should not do this, I could damage the fork etc

    I've read this whole thread and on the first pages, there a few answers made my a marzocchi rep..... Wtf ?!? So is this mod safe or not ?

  8. #258
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlo489 View Post
    Hi guys ! I just bought a used devinci remix 2009. Came with a 44 tst2, 140 mm. I'd like to do the mod but I first contacted Rob Page at marzocchi about a few questions about this mod. He told me right away that I should not do this, I could damage the fork etc

    I've read this whole thread and on the first pages, there a few answers made my a marzocchi rep..... Wtf ?!? So is this mod safe or not ?
    This is a hack or unsanctioned mod so you will get no support - this is not unique to Marzocchi so don't get mad at them.

    It's a safe mod, but is very intermediate in mechanical skill/knowledge of suspension. You should have serviced your fork multiple times before you attempt. Then there is the shim configuration.

    All that said, who knows if it works for a 44 from 09?

    P

  9. #259
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    Well I've changed the oil once and attempted to open the cartridge using a tube to hold the body...anyway I'll open it and see if it matches the pictures you posted. My main problem with the fork is that when I remove the air, I can fully compress it. However, when I set it at 50 lbs, I can't seem to get the last 2 inches of travel...
    (I'm 165 lbs, and according to the manual, I should run it between 35-50 lbs)

    I was hoping this mod would solve the problem even though it's done for high speed compliance...
    Last edited by Charlo489; 04-29-2013 at 03:15 PM.

  10. #260
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlo489 View Post
    Well I've changed the oil once and attempted to open the cartridge using a tube to hold the body...anyway I'll open it and see if it matches the pictures you posted. My main problem with the fork is that when I remove the air, I can fully compress it. However, when I set it at 50 lbs, I can't seem to get the last 2 inches of travel...
    (I'm 165 lbs, and according to the manual, I should run it between 35-50 lbs)

    I was hoping this mod would solve the problem even though it's done for high speed compliance...
    If you read mid thread somewhere, you will find that by removing the whole cartridge / push rod assembly from the top and bottom of the fork, an area is exposed to get a cone wrench on the lower body allowing you to open the cart.

    Note: Heat the thread area up first with a hair dryer. This will prevent you from sheering the cart body top off just below the threads.

    Once in, its easy. Just follow the directions and reference everyones weight and shim setup in the thread to get you close on your shim stack the first time. Its a pretty easy mod. Just remeber, this stuff is delicate so be carefull.

    Also, refer to this for a very well laid out "for dummies" version of shim stack basics. (It helped me pick my stack design (went with a cross over)).
    Piston & Shim Technology ‚Äď DVO Suspension

  11. #261
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlo489 View Post
    ...My main problem with the fork is that when I remove the air, I can fully compress it. However, when I set it at 50 lbs, I can't seem to get the last 2 inches of travel...
    Sounds like you might have too much bath oil on the spring side if it is spring + air + oil level system. If so, removing some spring side oil will make it more linear.

    P

  12. #262
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    hey, sorry to drag up an old thread but i am stuck here. i just cant get the nut off the tat cart. it must be really loctited on there good. any tips on removing it?

  13. #263
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    I used a heat gun ! Worked pretty good. Remove the o-ring first or it will melt

  14. #264
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    how hot did you need to get it?

  15. #265
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    Well i applied torque while heating it....took a good 5 min of heating before the nut came loose. You'll see some smoke eventually and that's the loctite melting !

  16. #266
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    I still would love to make a shimmed rebound piston for this damper, but sadly I don't have access to a lathe

  17. #267
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    Marzocchi 55TST2 air..No Lock off..

    I was about to dissemble the forks to modify the damoer as per your post only to find all the pictures had vanished,,can they be reinstated as it will make to job so much easier with both script & pictures..
    Thank you.
    FLANGOS...

  18. #268
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    Hi everyone,

    I have an issue with my 55 RC3 Ti EVO2 from 2013. Itís a great fork, probably the best single-crown on the market. I like the plushness and a small bumps performance, the smoothness is absolutely great.

    I ride enduro mostly but with dh style - I use this fork on technical single trails, pretty fast slopes with some jumps and harsher sections and smaller a-lines but without rock gardens from hell or huge step downs like 30ft long.

    I need a fork which will be active and not very progressive and which wonít dive when I push hard in fast corners or flying over the trails. I feel the standard setup is buttery smooth, progressive at the last 30% but eats the travel at the beginning and in the middle of the stroke pretty easily. Iíve added 3psi to the air assist and the fork starts to be more supportive but now is much more progressive and I canít use more than 14mm of travel.

    So what can I do to add some support in the middle of the stroke? Can you suggest how can I set up the shims to change the characteristic? The fork could be a bit less plush, I donít need super buttery smoothness. Iím 175lbs btw.

    Thanks for help!

  19. #269
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pitr View Post
    Hi everyone,

    I have an issue with my 55 RC3 Ti EVO2 from 2013. Itís a great fork, probably the best single-crown on the market. I like the plushness and a small bumps performance, the smoothness is absolutely great.

    I ride enduro mostly but with dh style - I use this fork on technical single trails, pretty fast slopes with some jumps and harsher sections and smaller a-lines but without rock gardens from hell or huge step downs like 30ft long.

    I need a fork which will be active and not very progressive and which wonít dive when I push hard in fast corners or flying over the trails. I feel the standard setup is buttery smooth, progressive at the last 30% but eats the travel at the beginning and in the middle of the stroke pretty easily. Iíve added 3psi to the air assist and the fork starts to be more supportive but now is much more progressive and I canít use more than 14mm of travel.

    So what can I do to add some support in the middle of the stroke? Can you suggest how can I set up the shims to change the characteristic? The fork could be a bit less plush, I donít need super buttery smoothness. Iím 175lbs btw.

    Thanks for help!
    I've not worked with an RC3 yet but, you would need to look at possibly beefing up your mid valve shims. I will also add that the zocchi air assits have to be spot on pressure wise. You might fiddle with that some more as well. +/- half a pound makes a huge difference between being too soft, just right, or too firm.

    Check out this explanation of shims on DVO's website:
    Piston & Shim Technology ? DVO Suspension

    Also, if you want to go all out, look into avalanche suspension aftermarket cartridges for the 55 RC3. They have great mid stroke support and would give you arguably the best 160mm fork money can buy when matched to your RC3 chassis.

  20. #270
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar797 View Post
    I've not worked with an RC3 yet but, you would need to look at possibly beefing up your mid valve shims. I will also add that the zocchi air assits have to be spot on pressure wise. You might fiddle with that some more as well. +/- half a pound makes a huge difference between being too soft, just right, or too firm.

    Check out this explanation of shims on DVO's website:
    Piston & Shim Technology ? DVO Suspension

    Also, if you want to go all out, look into avalanche suspension aftermarket cartridges for the 55 RC3. They have great mid stroke support and would give you arguably the best 160mm fork money can buy when matched to your RC3 chassis.
    Thanks for suggestions. I'll play with air pressure, maybe this could help. I'll also try to lower oil volume. The key point is that with current settings (mid set compression + air assist) the mid stroke support is great but I can't use more than 140mm of travel. When I set less pressure, I can use all the travel but mid stroke starts to be a bit too soft.

    Avalanche sounds great but the price...

  21. #271
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pitr View Post
    Thanks for suggestions. I'll play with air pressure, maybe this could help. I'll also try to lower oil volume. The key point is that with current settings (mid set compression + air assist) the mid stroke support is great but I can't use more than 140mm of travel. When I set less pressure, I can use all the travel but mid stroke starts to be a bit too soft.

    Avalanche sounds great but the price...
    Yah that's the issue with zocchi's stock. Super supple but no midstroke.

    I would suggest running as much oil as possible while still being able to compress a full 160mm with 0 PSI. Then add air from that point and there is likely a happy mid point between sensitive and bottom out control.

    If it still doesn't feel right pop open the RC3 cart, find the shims, and beef up the mid stroke shims. If you want to get crazy, you can bore oil ports and just add heavier shine but that's getting crazy. (I did it with an old dorado I run. (Which feels bad ass )

  22. #272
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    Ok, this is what I did. When I use no air and more oil, I could use all the travel but the fork was definitelly too soft and blows the travel very easly. So I removed a few milliliters of oil from the damper side. With no air in the air assist, it was very easy to bottomed out. After that I put 7-8 pumps of air (2-3 more than before), set compression in the middle and... it works! Now I still have more mid-stroke suport and I can use more travel. Fork feels nimble and lively, doesn't dive. More information after next tests.

  23. #273
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    Awesome thread and keen to do the same to my 2008 55 TST2's but could someone tell me if the chainring spacer is necessary? And also what oil levels I need in each leg as I need to do this as well.

    Thank you.

  24. #274
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    I didn't, but my stock inflexible stack had a thick 12mm clamp shim that I re-used with my new bendy stack.

    And the oil... for the damper you'll need enough 7.5W oil to submerse the piston of the compression assembly by at least 1cm, but not much more. Don't forget to stroke the rebound a few times, so there won't be air captured under the rebound piston.

    And in the lowers: on the damper side just use 20ml for lubrication, and you can try 200ml on the spring side. If you find the travel to be too linear, you can add a little by removing the spring topcap, and pouring in there to increase progressiveness.

  25. #275
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    Quote Originally Posted by two-one View Post
    I didn't, but my stock inflexible stack had a thick 12mm clamp shim that I re-used with my new bendy stack.

    And the oil... for the damper you'll need enough 7.5W oil to submerse the piston of the compression assembly by at least 1cm, but not much more. Don't forget to stroke the rebound a few times, so there won't be air captured under the rebound piston.

    And in the lowers: on the damper side just use 20ml for lubrication, and you can try 200ml on the spring side. If you find the travel to be too linear, you can add a little by removing the spring topcap, and pouring in there to increase progressiveness.
    Thanks two-one.

    When you talk of adding oil to the lower do you mean adding it through the bottom of the fork so where the rebound adjustment is?

  26. #276
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    Quote Originally Posted by fury84 View Post
    Thanks two-one.

    When you talk of adding oil to the lower do you mean adding it through the bottom of the fork so where the rebound adjustment is?
    Yup, when you reassemble the fork, slide the uppers into the lowers only partly so that the holes in the lowers are still opened, and pour in the oil. Don't forget to clean and lubricate the wiper seals with some silicone grease like slick honey... it will make it a little plusher

    What kind of shim stack will you be placing?

  27. #277
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    Quote Originally Posted by two-one View Post
    Yup, when you reassemble the fork, slide the uppers into the lowers only partly so that the holes in the lowers are still opened, and pour in the oil. Don't forget to clean and lubricate the wiper seals with some silicone grease like slick honey... it will make it a little plusher

    What kind of shim stack will you be placing?
    And that's only for the damper side, right? Just add oil from the top the spring?

    For shims I was thinking 18, 17, 16, 14 and 12, all .10 thick. TBH I'm just copying what appeared to be a popular set-up, I don't really under forks well enough to know what tweaks will make what differences. That said, I am practically minded which is why I'm keen to service/mod my own forks.

  28. #278
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    Quote Originally Posted by fury84 View Post
    And that's only for the damper side, right? Just add oil from the top the spring?
    Sure, either way works for the spring side.

    I'm currently running the following stack:

    12mm clamp shim
    12 x 0.10
    14 x 0.10
    16 x 0.10
    18 x 0.10
    20 x 0.10
    20 x 0.25 ring shim, with 16 x 0.10 centering shim
    20 x 0.10
    20 x 0.10
    Main compression piston

    So that's much stiffer stack, but it allows some pretty varied settings, with a climbing platform when set to lock-out.

  29. #279
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    And in yours the clamp shim was already a clamp holding the existing shims in place? Thanks for all the pointer btw, do appreciate the help.

  30. #280
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    Having damaged my forks on a ride recently I searched the net for guidance and found this mod which I decided to do whilst the forks were stripped down. Having stripped the forks I discovered the cartridge had sheered at the bottom of the threaded section where itís thinnest.
    Now to find a new cartridge!!!!


  31. #281
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    I may have a spare cartridge in the parts box somewhere; you'd need to use your damper components, though. If you're interested send me a PM and I'll confirm it's compatible with yours. :-)

  32. #282
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevo the Devo View Post
    I may have a spare cartridge in the parts box somewhere; you'd need to use your damper components, though. If you're interested send me a PM and I'll confirm it's compatible with yours. :-)
    Very kind of you Steve, PM sent!

  33. #283
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    Some time ago I bought a load of shims from mx-tech.com but never got around to doing this mod and sold the forks. The shims themselves cost a little over $10 but the shipping was very expensive. If anyone in the UK is interested in the following shims for £10 posted, PM me.

    08 ID x 20 OD x .10 mm (QTY 3)
    08 ID x 18 OD x .10 mm (QTY 1)
    08 ID x 17 OD x .10 mm (QTY 1)
    08 ID x 16 OD x .10 mm (QTY 2)
    08 ID x 14 OD x .10 mm (QTY 1)
    08 ID x 12 OD x .10 mm (QTY 1)
    08 ID x 20 OD x .25 mm (QTY 1)

    This gives you the options to create the popular shim stacks as discussed throughout this thread.

  34. #284
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    Quote Originally Posted by two-one View Post
    Sure, either way works for the spring side.

    I'm currently running the following stack:

    12mm clamp shim
    12 x 0.10
    14 x 0.10
    16 x 0.10
    18 x 0.10
    20 x 0.10
    20 x 0.25 ring shim, with 16 x 0.10 centering shim
    20 x 0.10
    20 x 0.10
    Main compression piston

    So that's much stiffer stack, but it allows some pretty varied settings, with a climbing platform when set to lock-out.
    I know this is an OLD thread, but I have a bike I bought used with a 2010 Marz TST2 and I would like to get some mid stroke resistance as my fork really dives after initial resistance. I've tried various pressures without much sucess and now am going to do the conversion. My question is about the sizes and scraping. At the start of the thread Mr.P said:

    8) Bye bye thick unflexing washers. Hello flexy goodness shims and spacer! Welcome speed sensitive damping! Right now it is a pyramid stack 17mm, 16mm, 16mm, 15mm, 13mm. All (I think) .010 thick except for the 13mm which is .005 thick. 18mm scraped the side of the cartridge. (all 8mm ID).

    I was wondering if I can use 18 and 20 mm shims. I have read DVO's shim stack explanations.
    Thanks if anyone reads this!!!
    Last edited by zbird; 10-20-2015 at 05:14 PM.

  35. #285
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    Quote Originally Posted by zbird View Post
    I was wondering if I can use 18 and 20 mm shims. I have read DVO's shim stack explanations.
    Thanks if anyone reads this!!!
    A simple stack of 20mm shims are actually fine. The only reason to go for a pyramid stack is shim durability, because the multiple diameters cause a variation of bending points, distributing the stress. But this is most relevant on rear shocks where oil flow and forces are much larger.

    If you only have 20 and 18mm shims of 0.1mm thickness, I would probably choose a stack of 6 of them.

    But do remember, the shimstack mod actually softens the damping, but allows you to close the adjuster.

  36. #286
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    Hey thanks two-one. Sorry I didn't word my question very well.
    I want to stiffen the midstroke as it is way too soft there but it is perfect in the beginning and at the bottom. My understanding is I need to go with the largest shims possible (I saw that Mr. P got scraping above 17mm and you didn't) going down in a pyramid shim stack to get a more continuous curve of dampening, along with oil levels, oil weight, and air pressure adjustments.

  37. #287
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    I dont know what mr P did, but 20mm shims fit fine.
    The damping profile between pyramid or straight stack is practically the same. I don't believe in "highspeed and lowspeed shims", because it functions as a single 3dimensional leaf-spring.
    So you want to increase "midstroke support"... how supportive does the fork currently feel when you turn the compression knob halfway closed? And how much pressure+sag do you run?

  38. #288
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    Interesting concept of it being a 3d leafspring--years ago we use to play with length and thickness of the leafs(and even teflon strips in between) to get the right ride on our Jeeps when we use to go offroad in Baja California. The compression knob feels like it affects mostly the initial dampening but still has midstroke dive. I have tried increments between 22 to 60 psi( I weigh 200 with a pack).

    A friend had the same fork and he changed to 2.5 wt.oil which for him worked. I am going to check the oil levels anyway and I thought I might as well change to a flexible pyramid stack. So I guess the variables are stack(slight?), air pressure, cmp. knob, oil level, and oil weight?

  39. #289
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    Well I changed from the 4 thick washers to the pyramid flexible shim stack, played around with various sizes and came up with
    08 mm ID x 17 mm OD x .15 mm x2
    08 mm ID x 16 mm OD x .15 mm x2
    08 mm ID x 15 mm OD x .10 mm x2
    08 mm ID x 14 mm OD x .10 mm x1
    08 mm ID x 13 mm OD x .10 mm x1
    08 mm ID x 12 mm OD x .10 mm x2
    08 mm ID x 11 mm OD x .30 mm x1
    with an 08mm x 10 x .30 in between shim 2 and 3 (16 and 15mm) to act as a crossover shim on advice from DVO Suspension. It got rid of the midstroke dive, compression is now predictable, feels great for small bumps and plush on slow speed compression. In fact I now hardly even think about the fork as it now does it's job right. Almost feels like some of the high end forks I got to ride when I use to work at a high end mt. bike rental store. I rode many Specialized, Giants, Turners, Ibis, Kona. We could use any non-rented bike on our days off--rode the Tahoe Rim Trail so many times

  40. #290
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    Its so weird marz didnt shim these from the factory.

    Is the rebound damper on those forks a proper shimmed damper? Does it work comparably well to a RS shimmed damper?

    Its this or a lyrik. I want a 160mm fork, but with a straight steer tube.

  41. #291
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Its so weird marz didnt shim these from the factory.

    Is the rebound damper on those forks a proper shimmed damper? Does it work comparably well to a RS shimmed damper?

    Its this or a lyrik. I want a 160mm fork, but with a straight steer tube.
    Just 4 basic washers that don't flex. For many people they seemed to work well enough with the correct air pressure. On my particular fork I wondered if they were out of spec when they were built due to a 4 inch "diving" between 1 and 5 inches of travel during big hits.
    The whole procedure really wasn't that difficult, I just followed the previous instructions.
    I really couldn't say which I would prefer between the RS Lyrik and this--just that now with the damper mod, I like it a lot! I guess it depends on the price, how used it is and what features you really need. I just never use lockout up front on my bike (a 2007 Turner RFX) but I notice that is dependent on you and the bikes geometry as some of the rental bikes I rode I had to use the lockout for climbing.

  42. #292
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Is the rebound damper on those forks a proper shimmed damper? Does it work comparably well to a RS shimmed damper?

    Its this or a lyrik. I want a 160mm fork, but with a straight steer tube.
    The rebound side is just a simple port-orifice damper.

    The only way to get shimmed rebound damping is by creating your own piston... which I did

    Marzocchi 55 TST2 conversion to shim damping: step by step-portable.jpg
    The upper piston is the original, and the lower one is a custom design with the rebound shims to the right.
    Left is the checkvalve with a custom wave-spring

  43. #293
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    Quote Originally Posted by two-one View Post
    The rebound side is just a simple port-orifice damper.

    The only way to get shimmed rebound damping is by creating your own piston... which I did

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	1060306
    The upper piston is the original, and the lower one is a custom design with the rebound shims to the right.
    Left is the checkvalve with a custom wave-spring
    Looks wild with the triangular cutouts and some "chamfering" there! Seems like your small bump compliance would be really nice now

  44. #294
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    seems like people here know this fork a lot better than my lbs who weren't much help. just got a bike with the '09 55 ata with tst2. problem i'm having is really harsh top out. wondering if this might be fixed with the shim mod or if it's more of an oil level issue (or maybe that's the way the fork is?) my lockout doesn't seem to do anything as far as i can tell. ATA still works fine. any ideas of where to start?

  45. #295
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremysbrown View Post
    seems like people here know this fork a lot better than my lbs who weren't much help. just got a bike with the '09 55 ata with tst2. problem i'm having is really harsh top out. wondering if this might be fixed with the shim mod or if it's more of an oil level issue (or maybe that's the way the fork is?) my lockout doesn't seem to do anything as far as i can tell. ATA still works fine. any ideas of where to start?
    I am only a beginner with mtb fork tech and I have a 2010 TST2. I am not sure of the differences between the years. But I guess you could start by clarifying what you mean by a "harsh top out" though that sounds to me to be your rebound adjustment located at the bottom of the forks.

    For me this fork really changes with the wrong oil level and especially the air pressure and it is a low pressure shock (22-52 psi according to a 2010 manual).

    There is a bleed procedure explained TST2 Bleed alternative w/pics if you want to start there. And on my fork if my air pressure drops below 44 psi it becomes quickly way too soft. I did do the shim conversion and along with more oil and the correct air pressure it fixed my mid stroke dropout problem and made small bump compliance better. It probably took me 2 hours once I found the right socket. I believe you can still get that year's fork manual online if you don't have one.

    Hopefully two-one still reads this thread as he seems to really know the fork and understands hydraulic fork technology way better than I.

    Hope this helps a bit!

    Jeff
    Last edited by zbird; 07-17-2016 at 12:35 PM.

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    Well I changed from the 4 thick washers to the pyramid flexible shim stack, played around with various sizes and came up with
    08 mm ID x 17 mm OD x .15 mm x2
    08 mm ID x 16 mm OD x .15 mm x2
    08 mm ID x 15 mm OD x .10 mm x2
    08 mm ID x 14 mm OD x .10 mm x1
    08 mm ID x 13 mm OD x .10 mm x1
    08 mm ID x 12 mm OD x .10 mm x2
    08 mm ID x 11 mm OD x .30 mm x1
    with an 08mm x 10 x .30 in between shim 2 and 3 (16 and 15mm) to act as a crossover shim on advice from DVO Suspension. It got rid of the midstroke dive, compression is now predictable, feels great for small bumps and plush on slow speed compression. In fact I now hardly even think about the fork as it now does it's job right. Almost feels like some of the high end forks I got to ride when I use to work at a high end mt. bike rental store. I rode many Specialized, Giants, Turners, Ibis, Kona. We could use any non-rented bike on our days off--rode the Tahoe Rim Trail so many times
    Oh man, I have same problem - if I had correct sag and plush feeling then I had no support in mid stroke, so I pump my fork up to 130 psi just to keep it high and suportive when I ride hard (Im around <80 kg when geared up).

    Where did you get your washers? I have hard times here in Lithuania, and shipping from USA cost 40$ .. when washers cost only 10$

  47. #297
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    Hi Henry,

    Now with more reading and talking with folks I think my problem was the combination of slightly low oil level on the damper side, stiction at the seals, the stock 4 washers that are not flexible, and running too low of air pressure to make the fork plusher. I now always flip the bike upside down and cycle the forks a few times before riding and that seems to take care of the stiction.

    I bought my shims from MX Tech Shop - Valving Shims - 8 mm ID 1 - MX-Tech

    You could also try Suspension Direct 3. 8mm ID Shims - Shim Parts | Suspension Direct, Inc.

    For new seals: 35MM BOMBER SEAL KIT

    Also be aware that if you do change fork oil, that fork oils list viscosity at 100 C. As mountain bikers we may get 40 -45 C in the fork and viscosities can be quite different at that temp. See this chart:
    http://i41.tinypic.com/25qpx81.png

    There must be some European motorcycle shop that has suspension shims but I couldn't find one.

    Hope this helps

  48. #298
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    Hi guys, another tip is the usage of Molykote 55 grease (or slick honey or something similar) in the seals... if you pack the various edges and cavities, the plushness will be greatly increased.

    Whenever I see people on unmodified Marz55's in a bikepark, I always feel sorry for them....

    Tinker on!

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