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  1. #1
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    Lyrik Air to Coil conversion - why smoother?

    I am considering changing my Lyrik Solo Air to a U-turn coil. What I'm not sure about is why this makes it smoother and reduces stiction? Surely it is still the same seals etc?

    I think I know why, but let's see if anyone else comes up with the same answer!

    Mike

  2. #2
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    you lose two seals for the air system.

  3. #3
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    So in the air system, the air cartridge, attached to the bottom of the lower leg, has seals against the inside of the stanchion, creating a volume above it which is compressed and hence this is the "spring". In the coil system, the spring is attached to the bottom of the lower leg and the top of the stanchion, with no seal into the stanchion.

    Is this correct?

  4. #4
    moaaar shimz
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    It has been discussed many times before in this forum, do a search.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikebowden View Post
    So in the air system, the air cartridge, attached to the bottom of the lower leg, has seals against the inside of the stanchion, creating a volume above it which is compressed and hence this is the "spring". In the coil system, the spring is attached to the bottom of the lower leg and the top of the stanchion, with no seal into the stanchion.

    Is this correct?
    An air spring "cartridge" is self contained and independent of the stanchion for sealing. You have described a simple air piston using the stanchion wall to create the air spring. Design aside it does create a volume above and below the piston - positive and negative. There is a lot of info on this site about Solo & dual air systems. Moving to a coil reduces stichion for better compliance and smoother suspension action. Coils are not w/o their con's added weight, having to change coils to adjust the spring rate & most coil forks lack progression.

  6. #6
    aka dan51
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    You basically lose the seals that holds air in the chamber. That seal needs to be pretty damn tight to not let several hundred PSI by on compression. That tightness = stiction.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ...People thought they were getting a good fork because it was a "fox".

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