Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    118

    Independant Rear Triangles? What's the difference?

    I have been wondering for a while what the major aspects of the suspension seperate linkages such as VPP, DW Link, and Maistro (the giant one)? All I seem to come up with are people saying that one is better than the other because it feels better. I suppose I am wondering about the theoretical differences. I understand that you can manipulate the suspension charactaristics simply by changing dimensions, but is this all that seperates these systems?

    Thank you for any help...

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    118
    No dice? Bummer...

  3. #3
    Just another FOC'er
    Reputation: .Danno.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2,222
    I'd imagine you're not getting any answers because there have been loooooong threads in the past that have beat this subject to death.

    Search around a bit.

  4. #4
    My gloves stink
    Reputation: Appendage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,437

    Ask Derby

    There's a guy who goes by the tag of Derby who goes on and on about that kind of stuff. Too technical for me, but he can give you an answer. Lately it seems he hangs out mostly in the Iron Horse (DW-Link) forum.
    I dreamed I ate a 10 lb marshmallow. When I awoke, my pillow was gone.

  5. #5
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059
    And another one to throw into that mix is the Maverick. I've been saying that I believe the "dual link" main pivot design definitely has some magic when it comes to a very broad off road performance...climbing, descending, pedaling, etc. Why?...I have no engineering explanation to give you the answer you're looking for because I don't have any business trying to do so. All I know is that the bikes using this dual link design seem to be performing very well in just about all off road conditions. And while I know it's because the wheelpath is being manipulated in a positive way with this design, I don't know the exact engineering that's accomplishing it.

    Now...this isn't saying that other designs available now fail to perform well. Some of those designs manipulate their wheelpaths to achieve very good performance. The thing about the dual link designed bikes is that just about all of them with this design seem to have excellent performance. This indicates to my pea brain that "they" may be on to something inherently beneficial to suspension design with the dual link. My understanding is that having that articulating link allows the wheelpath to maintain a more optimum arc throughout its movement that a design with a solid point from the pivot to the axle can't necessarily accomplish.

    Your question about the "separation" of performance among these dual link systems kind of answers itself. You said that you understand the issue of being able to manipulate the performance of the given dual link suspension designs by changing dimensions. Well, that's pretty dramatic when you change up the frame components, their size, and timing of their movements. I'm also relatively sure that each dual link design...and even different model bikes within each brand...has slightly different performance because of different link sizes and placement of the links...probably not a tough assumption. But again, just about all the bikes with a dual link main pivot seem to accomplish a high level of performance, which seems to indicate that the foundation of their success is in the main pivot design.

    I really wonder how effective posting up a bunch of charts with wheelpath graphs will be to understanding why this design works so well. We have a lot of "real world" experience on this site with many of these bikes with the dual link main pivot, and they seem to be overwhelmingly positive...but I'd like to see them anyway if someone has them. Design engineers obviously must be able to get a grip on the nuances of how different influences affect performance of a suspension system, but even the best computer in the hands of the best engineer can't guarantee success. What looks good on paper...or in the computer...doesn't always translate into a good performing suspension design. The differences in the execution of the dual link main pivot design among the brands mentioned here "look" fairly dramatic, but I'd suspect their rear wheelpath characteristics may be fairly close to each other.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •