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  1. #1
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    Hot Fox Float rear shock

    I just got a Bronson and it came with a Fox Float Kashima rear shock. After long rocky downhills the shock, and especially the shaft, are really hot. Like to the point that it burns if I accidentally touch it. I had a non-Kashima before this and never had this issue that I knew of. Is this normal and has anybody had this issue?

  2. #2
    D_K
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    I would have to say that's not normal. At least I haven't noticed mine doing that yet. Maybe Fox is forgetting to put oil in their rear shocks as well as their forks now??

  3. #3
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    Well, I contacted Fox and they said its perfectly normal. Funny that I've heard nothing about it and my previous 3 Fox shocks didn't do it. I'll definitely be keeping an eye on it.

  4. #4
    Plays with tools
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    It would make sense that it would get abnormally hot until it breaks in, then the operating temperature would fall in line more with what you're use to.

  5. #5
    LCW
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    Hot Fox Float rear shock

    OP - it's possible you're pushing that new Bronson much harder than you're previous bikes without realizing... 27.5 wheels, better geo and suspension improvements might be allowing you to ride faster than before but feels the same because it's smoother and more controlled...
    2011 Yeti 575 - Fox Float 36 RC2 160 - 31.5 lbs

  6. #6
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    If it helps, my Mojo's kashima float ctd also heats up pretty well on long rocky descents. Not accidental burn hot, but at least warm through your gloves sort of hot. Part of it is the shock getting outclassed by the riding. If you're descending hard on the bike, you may be in the market for something like a Monarch Plus or a Vector Air to better dissipate that heat and give you consistent damping through the descent.

    Another possibility is setup. If your rebound is too slow for your descending, you may be packing down and spending a lot of time in the deep midstroke. That would exacerbate a heating problem.

  7. #7
    LCW
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    Hot Fox Float rear shock

    If be curious about the new CTD Float X - more oil volume with the piggy back reservoir. Should run cooler.
    2011 Yeti 575 - Fox Float 36 RC2 160 - 31.5 lbs

  8. #8
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    I've had the same issue and I haven't even ridden the bike yet..... was cycling it aggressively for 15 maybe 20 seconds to set sag and I noticed the shock was hot the the touch, unusually hot. I have three other bike all with fox floats but I've never seen anything like this before ..... the bike is a rocky mountain altitude 750msl 650b with a float ctd shock... hopefully someone can determine is this is normal or a warranty issue

  9. #9
    GUIDANCE COUNSELOR
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    My shock is very warm after a full resort run or enduro stage. It's normal. It's called dissipation.

    Heat also changes the viscosity of the oil and can reduce the damping quality of your suspension. Shocks and forks that flow more oil do not build up as much heat nor suffer from the performance fluctuations of those that have little oil.

    It shouldn't be so hot it burns though....
    NOAH SEARS
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    TECH QUESTIONS HERE: INFO@MRPBIKE.COM

  10. #10
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    This is normal. Heat is created in a shock because the dampers convert kinematic energy in to heat. So if your shock is hot that just means the dampers are working. It's not good for a shock to be hot, but it's necessary.

    So now to reasons this may not have happened on your last shock (though some of this has been mentioned briefly above):
    - The Bronson may have a higher leverage ratio than your old frame. I know Santa Cruz VPP bikes tend to have a fairly higher leverage ratio in the mid stroke. This means the shock will have to be tuned to have higher compression damping. Similarly, a higher leverage ratio will require a higher spring rate, and as such more rebound damping.
    - Aside from the leverage ratios and internal suspension valving, if you are not one to pay much attention to your suspension setup, you may just have the dampers dials on your new shock set firmer than the dials on your old shock.
    - If the size of your shock is different that may have an effect. If the new shock contains less oil than the old one, then the oil will get hotter.
    - Your new shock may just be better at dissipating heat due to an updated design. If you can feel the heat, that means it is being extracted from the shock nicely. If there is heat being created that you cannot feel, that means it is stuck inside the shock where it is screwing up your damping and spring rate.

  11. #11
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    as Matty was said updated designs, i've heard the kashima coating is not all about stiction, but it also has a higher coefficient of thermal conduction allowing more heat to escape letting the shock work better (keeping the oil from staying hot)

  12. #12
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    The bottom line though is you need a new shock for that type of riding. Sticking with air the best options are Vector Air, Vivid Air or CCDB Air, otherwise a coil over is the way to go as the coil is dissipating a lot of the energy and the oil reservoir is much larger to deal with the rigors of extended DH runs.

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  13. #13
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    Just to confirm: I went downhilling on my Yeti SB66 with a Fox Float Kashima today, and while I wouldn't say the shock was too hot to touch at all, it was certainly too hot to grab and hold. It also lost some damping. One of the new piggyback Float Xs would have been handy.

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