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  1. #1
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    Fox Annual Service suggestions...

    So.. I bought a 12' Stumpjumper FSR in May. I put close to 1,200 miles on it from May through October. Due to weather, our riding season is basically over. On the Fox Website, they suggest a yearly service from them. I am wondering if that is a sort of revenue stream they have going, or if it is necessary to do each year?

    I definitely do not want to have an issue with either my Fork or Rear shock during the riding season next year as I am reading Fox is quite slow on their turnaround.

    I've read through the DYI's posted in the Suspension forum and watched Video's on rebuilding yourself, and I have zero desire to attempt this on my own.

    So, basically... Is two years and 2,500 miles too much to expect from a Fork and Rear shock un-serviced, or should I send them in while my bike is just sitting in the basement collecting dust over the cold winter months.

    Thanks for your suggestions.

  2. #2
    moaaar shimz
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    Yes, 2 years/2500 miles is too much, especially the fork...

    Try to service it yourself.

  3. #3
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    TRD: depends on your use and environment and other variables. YMMV, of course. I've had experiences of 4-5 years of use no problems, and dead on arrival on brand new forks. So YMMV, of course. I like the proactive approach but in reality, dont fix it unless its broken. The first instance where you notice a difference in shock/fork suspension performance is the time to put a service on the to do list. I'd rather deal with suspension company directly or the LBS if the LBS has proven specific experience with rebuilds on your fork.
    #willofthesun and author of the most viewed MTBR thread: Platform Pedal Shootout

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by toyotatacomaTRD View Post
    So.. I bought a 12' Stumpjumper FSR in May. I put close to 1,200 miles on it from May through October. Due to weather, our riding season is basically over. On the Fox Website, they suggest a yearly service from them. I am wondering if that is a sort of revenue stream they have going, or if it is necessary to do each year?

    I definitely do not want to have an issue with either my Fork or Rear shock during the riding season next year as I am reading Fox is quite slow on their turnaround.

    I've read through the DYI's posted in the Suspension forum and watched Video's on rebuilding yourself, and I have zero desire to attempt this on my own.

    So, basically... Is two years and 2,500 miles too much to expect from a Fork and Rear shock un-serviced, or should I send them in while my bike is just sitting in the basement collecting dust over the cold winter months.

    Thanks for your suggestions.
    Have you ever even looked at the Fox service schedule? It's right there in your user manual or on the Fox website.

    Yes, you absolutely need to service them, and it's a lot more often than "annually". In fact, Fox doesn't even go by calendar but by riding hours. The fork should have it's oil changed every and the shock its air sleeve serviced every 30 riding hours, with the bigger services coming at every 100 hours of riding. It's all right here:
    Bike Suspension Service | FOX

    Since you've neglected both of them, it wouldn't surprise me if they're already damaged and will need repair.

    But let me guess, you never change the oil in your car because it's just the manufacturer trying to rip you off?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by illnacord View Post
    The first instance where you notice a difference in shock/fork suspension performance is the time to put a service on the to do list.
    The first instance you notice a difference it's already too late to do preventive maintenance. Really, what is so hard about following the maintenance schedule?

  6. #6
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    My buddy bought a used 3 year old mountain bike so I listed some maintenance to be performed. When he got to the rear shock he shook his head. He told me it feels fine. We discussed suggested maintenance intervals and it boiled down to the fact that the cost is the same to perform an oil change or rebuild a shock. I couldn't really dispute that fact other than saying a worn shock could have decreased performance or fail during a ride.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    Have you ever even looked at the Fox service schedule? It's right there in your user manual or on the Fox website.

    Yes, you absolutely need to service them, and it's a lot more often than "annually". In fact, Fox doesn't even go by calendar but by riding hours. The fork should have it's oil changed every and the shock its air sleeve serviced every 30 riding hours, with the bigger services coming at every 100 hours of riding. It's all right here:
    Bike Suspension Service | FOX

    Since you've neglected both of them, it wouldn't surprise me if they're already damaged and will need repair.

    But let me guess, you never change the oil in your car because it's just the manufacturer trying to rip you off?
    Lets be honest, every 30 hours is excessive. I am not a bike mechanic and I would be willing to bet there are more people that don't do their own service than do. If I were to follow their "plan", I would be sending my fork in for service every 20 days during the summer. Not happening.

    I confirmed with my LBS that the every 30 hour schedule is excessive (that is just their and my opinion). The two good shops in my area do not even offer this service on my fork.

    I can tell you probably do your own service. That is great for you. I do not plan on attempting it myself. If I do damage by not opening up my fork once a month to replace seals and fork oil, I'll chalk it up to the cost of riding. No big deal. I am just trying to see what kind of life people are getting out of their forks without rebuilding each riding season.

  8. #8
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    By not maintaining correctly you're looking at destroying many hundreds of dollars of suspension equipment. In the end it's cheaper to maintain than replace, not to mention less wasteful.

    Doing the basic oil change is extremely easy to do at home, and once you've done it a few times it can easily be done under 20 minutes. You don't need to replace seals on the 30 hour service, just oil, so it only costs a couple dollars in supplies.

    It appears your two "good" shops aren't really that good. As I said, the service is simple and easy. Instead of asking a shop, why not call up someone who actually knows suspension like Fox or Push and ask them what a proper maintenance interval is?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen View Post
    My buddy bought a used 3 year old mountain bike so I listed some maintenance to be performed. When he got to the rear shock he shook his head. He told me it feels fine. We discussed suggested maintenance intervals and it boiled down to the fact that the cost is the same to perform an oil change or rebuild a shock. I couldn't really dispute that fact other than saying a worn shock could have decreased performance or fail during a ride.
    I can't speak for other brands, but a fox shock air sleeve rebuild kit is $15 and includes everything you need. There is no way that rebuilding a shock is that cheap, not even if they are simply installing an air sleeve kit.

    Servicing a fork is considerably more complicated and uses expensive lubricants, assuming you use the factory specified stuff.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColinL View Post
    I can't speak for other brands, but a fox shock air sleeve rebuild kit is $15 and includes everything you need. There is no way that rebuilding a shock is that cheap, not even if they are simply installing an air sleeve kit.

    Servicing a fork is considerably more complicated and uses expensive lubricants, assuming you use the factory specified stuff.
    The OP was referring to the annual service, I referenced the 100hr damper service not air the air sleeve. You will be charged the same amount of $ to service the damper oil on a functioning shock vs. blown.

  11. #11
    3diver
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    I do my oil changes once a year and ride moderately

  12. #12
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    FWIW I have a 2009 Fox F29 RL 100mm. Rode it for two seasons. Keep in mind I don't MTB near as much as I do road bike and time trial bike. I took it to a friend that was a shock tuner for Fox to change the oil and replace the seals. Probably about 100 to 150 miles on it. When he opned it up he said dirt was not yeat getting by the wipers so my timing was good. I road it again about 20 hours and the dampner went out. My friend rebuilt it and it worked great after that. I had premature leaking of one of the seal recently so back to my friend who changed the oil and replaced the seals for me using the new seal. His comments to me after I picked it from him was Even though the shock is almost 4 years old the bushing still looked brand new and everything else did too.

    His other comments to me was Fox is really the best shock but they do need regular maintenance to keep working well and the things I experienced is just part of owning one.

    FWIW, having my friend do the work is a little cheaper than the shop, I do pay for parts and its right that I compensate him for his time, but the real deal I get is getting a factory trained tuner working on my fork.
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  13. #13
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    30 hours may be a tad excessive, but definitely don't wait until you notice something, follow the basic schedule for oil changes and seals. Seals will slowly accumulate grime and the stiction will be slowly increasing throughout that time. You might not notice it because the performance degrades slowly, a little every ride. If you wait too long, this grime will damage the coating on the uppers. after a year without service, you may be pleasantly surprised how the fork feels afterwards.

  14. #14
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    late comment

    Quote Originally Posted by toyotatacomaTRD View Post
    So.. I bought a 12' Stumpjumper FSR in May. I put close to 1,200 miles on it from May through October. Due to weather, our riding season is basically over. On the Fox Website, they suggest a yearly service from them. I am wondering if that is a sort of revenue stream they have going, or if it is necessary to do each year?

    I definitely do not want to have an issue with either my Fork or Rear shock during the riding season next year as I am reading Fox is quite slow on their turnaround.

    I've read through the DYI's posted in the Suspension forum and watched Video's on rebuilding yourself, and I have zero desire to attempt this on my own.

    So, basically... Is two years and 2,500 miles too much to expect from a Fork and Rear shock un-serviced, or should I send them in while my bike is just sitting in the basement collecting dust over the cold winter months.

    Thanks for your suggestions.
    Yes you should get your fork and rear shock service over winter. Point is simple. Cost to buy new fork and rear shock when it broke or service it annually.

    I have been riding fox shocks and forks for a while (start mtb in 1990 so rode manitou II as my first fork) and broke forks and shocks. A fox shock can get stuck if not service right or not service.

    My local lbs is dealer so it cost me $60 to service rear shock (new seals and oil/labor). I have the oil changed on the fork every 100 hours and it usually 2 times a year. I've done this with fox and rock shox forks. I have the seals changed every 2 years because when the change my oil the 2nd time the shop said the seals aren't bad (oil change $70 for 1 service).

    I got a 2013 tallboy C now and my new fork is broke. Since I only rode it 10 weeks and way over the 30 hours service for lower leg lube service I wouldn't say to ignore the fox service to long (think I should had it done at 50 or 60 hours). I have alot of clunking noise at lower assembly area and a friend works in lbs said it sounds like I don't have oil in bottom.

    I'm having the shop I bought bike work out the fox fork and spent $500 getting a backup manitout tower pro 29er fork to ride while fox warrenty/service my fork. Meaning if I see it by february I'll be lucky. Fox shuts down for 3 weeks around xmas and does inventory that time of year (alot of places do that at year end).

    So the point is service you fork and shock because when it breaks it may be a while before you get it back (meaning lbs may need to wait 3 weeks to get the part from fox and it just a seal kit).

    bigE

  15. #15
    k_z
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    I did air sleeve maintenance on Fox Triad (RP23 for Specialized FSR XC Pro) after 2 years of riding mostly because I was not aware it needs to be done every year. Shock was very clean inside, has plenty of grease left and looked like it could easily make though next year. Just my experience..

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