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  1. #1
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    fox 32 F120R only gets 3.5in of travel

    So ive read a few of the threads on this forum about this issue but I would like woke conformation before I start trying the mods ive read about (cutting the air piston to increase the air chamber volume, removing float fluid etc...) when my fork is aired up and set to the proper sag I only get 3.5 in of travel without air I can bottom out the fork which is 5.5 inches, if the fork was working properly im assuming i should get somewhere around 4.5-4.75in of travel.... what are my options here? I'm very hesitant to start cutting things up and would like another more affordable option if in the event things go wrong..... also is it the floats that can be changed to 140mm of travel just buy removing a travel spacer l?

  2. #2
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    I weigh 170 and run my float at 55 psi which is around 30 to 35% sag to get most all travel. Other than some brake dive on quick stops I think I like it that way. No big drops but some 2 to 3 ft. Most times I still have 3/4 inch I didn't get to. Mine is a 2009 oe on a Speci XC Comp and no spacers when I did service. 120mm was it.
    Disclaimer: Always get a second opinion cause I'm just guessing

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    This can happen when your fork lacks adjustable low speed compression. I'm guessing that neither of you do, because if you did it would be good to use more air (re: reply #2) and back off the low speed compression.

    I have the opposite issue. I like a relatively firm fork, but even with 85-90 psi at 177 pounds ready to ride, I would bottom the fork hitting some jumps. (approx 2 feet of air.) Fortunately I have a RLC fork and I just added 3 clicks of low speed compression and the problem is solved. When I ride trail that I know has no jumps or drops I run less air pressure and less compression.

    Instead of cutting up the Fox fork I would just sell it and get a fork that has adjustable low speed compression. Manitou, perhaps, or a RLC if you can still find one. Another option is to have a suspension tuning shop modify it for you. I just don't like your odds at making a customization for the first time and it working out well for you. It would be much more likely to succeed on your 10th fork, or 100th, which obviously gives the suspension shops like Push, etc a big edge.

  5. #5
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    mine is rlc and have tried compression both ways. have tried just about everything except modifying internals. Do like the push idea for OP but my part the fork is getting older and about to part out the bike anyway. Moving on. All this aside my float has been good. Decent ride for the money I spent on it.
    Last edited by 00sable; 10-13-2012 at 07:26 AM.
    Disclaimer: Always get a second opinion cause I'm just guessing

  6. #6
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    Interesting. With mine I was able to do consecutive laps on a ~4.5 loop and see the fork's travel indicator move from bottomed out to ~25 mm from full with 4 clicks firmer and then ~10mm from full with 3 clicks firmer.

    Maybe your fork needs service. You can probably get good money for it if you have it serviced before selling on ebay.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColinL View Post
    Instead of cutting up the Fox fork I would just sell it and get a fork that has adjustable low speed compression. Manitou, perhaps, or a RLC if you can still find one. Another option is to have a suspension tuning shop modify it for you. I just don't like your odds at making a customization for the first time and it working out well for you. It would be much more likely to succeed on your 10th fork, or 100th, which obviously gives the suspension shops like Push, etc a big edge.
    This is a known issue with Fox forks due to their very progressive air springs, not their damping. Cutting down the air shaft makes it much more linear and allows you to tune it.

    Aside from that, Fox forks without adjustable LSC come from the factory already pretty well dialed.

  8. #8
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    Looks like they tamed the air spring progressiveness in 2013: FLOAT Air Spring Curves | Bike Technology | FOX

    If I didn't do any jumps or drops, I would have this same problem. I don't use all the travel in the fork on a standard trail.

  9. #9
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    The started increasing the air chamber size starting in 2010, but for a some people even the 2013 isn't linear enough.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColinL View Post
    This can happen when your fork lacks adjustable low speed compression. I'm guessing that neither of you do, because if you did it would be good to use more air (re: reply #2) and back off the low speed compression.

    I have the opposite issue. I like a relatively firm fork, but even with 85-90 psi at 177 pounds ready to ride, I would bottom the fork hitting some jumps. (approx 2 feet of air.) Fortunately I have a RLC fork and I just added 3 clicks of low speed compression and the problem is solved. When I ride trail that I know has no jumps or drops I run less air pressure and less compression.

    Instead of cutting up the Fox fork I would just sell it and get a fork that has adjustable low speed compression. Manitou, perhaps, or a RLC if you can still find one. Another option is to have a suspension tuning shop modify it for you. I just don't like your odds at making a customization for the first time and it working out well for you. It would be much more likely to succeed on your 10th fork, or 100th, which obviously gives the suspension shops like Push, etc a big edge.
    I agree wih you Im not going to modify It.... Already told he misses what I want for X-mas so when I replace the fork ill.possibly do another build in 650B and use this fork since I know it doesn't bottom out

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