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  1. #1
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    Finer details of Fox 36 float RC2 setup

    Constantly searching for the compromise between small bump compliance and a fork that doesn't dive all the time. So, to start really. Is it best to set sag with no hi or low speed compression set? Surely these would influence sag setting?

  2. #2
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    They will not do anything to the sag. Low speed compression will help with brake dive, but also compromise small bump. I would start with 4 clicks of low speed compression and high speed wide open.

  3. #3
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    whelp, that sounds like the RC2 damper.

    best thing you can do is pop the 2012 SKF seals in that guy if you have not already. You'll be able to run a bit higher pressure without it being so sticky.

    Try skf seals, fresh bath oil (I run mobil 1 synthetic ATF and think its the best yet) and 50% in on the LS and 75% in on the HS.

    I'm on a van 36. The medium spring sagged appropriately for me (20% and 175lbs) but I was constantly blowing thru all the travel on a 2ft jump. Now I'm running the firm spring coupled with the settings mentioned above. Fork is at 12-15% sag, but with the seals and ATF in the bath, and changing the bath oil frequently, it's not jarring on the small stuff. Best the fork has run so far, but I'm still not thrilled with it. It really needs the shims redone, but I'm not that skilled yet.

    Oh, when you drop the lowers, check the rc2 cart and make sure hte bladder is intact, not deformed or leaking or something that would mess up your comp dampening.

  4. #4
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    Thanks Guys. Stuck some SKF Seals and new oil in on Friday, before heading out on Saturday. Seemed to help some, but had an slow OTB when the fork bottomed out in a little gully. I'm running ~4/5 clicks from neg on hi and lo at the mo, with recommended sag psi from fox website. Seems pretty right on the sag!?

  5. #5
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    Gotta measure the sag with a ruler/caliper, the pressure recommendations are only starting points. You're probably looking for 25-30% of your travel. Also, measure your sag from your "attack" position (standing, not sitting).

    Sounds like you could also adjust the low speed compression to give you more platform. You'll lose some small bump sensitivity but it'll beat eating the knobs off your front tire.

  6. #6
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    Is the rebound set slow - could it be packing down?

    I found my Van36R felt and tracked the best when I set the rebound pretty fast, but I also had the light spring, so the rebound may be valved for heavier riders.

  7. #7
    Vorsprung Suspension
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    Start with between 13-16% sag. This will put you in the right spring ballpark - air springs will never see as much sag for a comparable "correct" spring rate as a coil fork because the actual spring rate is nonlinear (typically quite regressive at the beginning of the stroke, hence that "preloaded" feel). You may wish to go a little softer later on, but this is a good starting point. If you need it stiffer than 13%, something is up. Going as soft as 20% is acceptable for less aggressive riders, but if it's softer than that, again, something else is up with your setup.

    Start with both LSC and HSC at 6 clicks out from max, and adjust from there. Running lots of LSC with no HSC will result in a fork that dives like crazy AND feels harsh over small bumps. Too much HSC with too little LSC will result in a fork that feels ok over some bumps, dives a little but most undesirably is harsh on harder hits, so what you're aiming to do is run enough HSC and enough LSC to provide that mid-speed support without either LSC or HSC being excessive.
    VorsprungSuspension.com - fully engineered suspension retuning & servicing in Whistler, BC.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by honns View Post
    Gotta measure the sag with a ruler/caliper, the pressure recommendations are only starting points. You're probably looking for 25-30% of your travel. Also, measure your sag from your "attack" position (standing, not sitting).

    Sounds like you could also adjust the low speed compression to give you more platform. You'll lose some small bump sensitivity but it'll beat eating the knobs off your front tire.
    Sure, I understand its only a guide. It's currently set at ~30mm. And yeah, that's what I'm finding by giving more compression Its becoming a harsher ride.

    Quote Originally Posted by fsrxc View Post
    Is the rebound set slow - could it be packing down?

    I found my Van36R felt and tracked the best when I set the rebound pretty fast, but I also had the light spring, so the rebound may be valved for heavier riders.
    I would have thought it being slower would be easier to manage, although again I know if its too slow it'll pack down over successive bumps..

    Beginning to think that there will always be a trade off on longer travel forks no matter what the settings! Probably expecting too much..
    Thanks Guys..!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve VS View Post
    Start with between 13-16% sag. This will put you in the right spring ballpark - air springs will never see as much sag for a comparable "correct" spring rate as a coil fork because the actual spring rate is nonlinear (typically quite regressive at the beginning of the stroke, hence that "preloaded" feel). You may wish to go a little softer later on, but this is a good starting point. If you need it stiffer than 13%, something is up. Going as soft as 20% is acceptable for less aggressive riders, but if it's softer than that, again, something else is up with your setup.

    Start with both LSC and HSC at 6 clicks out from max, and adjust from there. Running lots of LSC with no HSC will result in a fork that dives like crazy AND feels harsh over small bumps. Too much HSC with too little LSC will result in a fork that feels ok over some bumps, dives a little but most undesirably is harsh on harder hits, so what you're aiming to do is run enough HSC and enough LSC to provide that mid-speed support without either LSC or HSC being excessive.
    Thanks Steve VS, you got in there while I was having my brekkie, and chewing over the previous posts..

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