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  1. #1
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    DVO inverted DH fork

    EXCLUSIVE: DVO Emerald Inverted DH Fork - First Look - Pinkbike

    I cant believe no one ever thought about making the stanchion guards on an inverted fork into a crown to solve the torsional flex issues. The fork looks bad ass.

    Anyone else have thoughts?

  2. #2
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    Certainly looks bad ass, holds a lot of promise. For me though I'm looking forward to their endro/am fork.

    The other thing I think holds promise is the way DVO have come out with guns blaz'n in the direction of customer service. Their site seems to be setup with educating and supporting the consumer in mind, something I have only experienced to the full extent from Avalanche.

  3. #3
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    I am looking for the AM fork as well since I dont have a DH bike. If they come out with a single crown inverted fork I will buy it regardless of price.

  4. #4
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    Whats MSRP on this bad boy?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119 View Post
    I cant believe no one ever thought about making the stanchion guards on an inverted fork into a crown to solve the torsional flex issues.
    Halson did a similar solution before...

    Count me in the group of skeptical about that particular issue.

    However the rest looks awesome. The damper is of the same type as the X-Fusion HLR.

    I like that is all shims and no nonsense (jury is out on the guard-bridge, though).
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  6. #6
    PMK
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    Agree about the lower tube guard acting as a stiffener, I won't argue their testing and results, but typically in a properly designed USD fork, the upper tubes are manipulated to increase flex and reduce harshness. The lowers with a large axle are not the big concern.

    It is very innovative on a lot of ideas, hope it works and I get the chance to test one.

    In the moto world, it is well known that the USD can be far more harsh than a right side up style. The USD does have as mentioned better lubrication to the main bushing but they often become plagued with seal drag issues trying to keep oil in or are many times maintenance hogs for constant low time seal cleaning plus greasing.

    These guys could go all in and hard anodize the detail parts to prevent galling and give a good wear surface.

    Cost wise, I doubt it will be cheap, my guess is probably close to $1800 retail, maybe more.

    Then again if it is Suntour making the parts, they might hit the ball with a decent design and lower cost.

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  7. #7
    PMK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp View Post
    Halson did a similar solution before...

    Count me in the group of skeptical about that particular issue.

    However the rest looks awesome. The damper is of the same type as the X-Fusion HLR.

    I like that is all shims and no nonsense (jury is out on the guard-bridge, though).
    They mention the Halson in the article. Honestly, with the current technology, the Halson method could produce a very light, stiff fork with a quality cartridge system.

    PK
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  8. #8
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    Cost said similar to other forks, So my best guess would be 1200-1600. Anywhere in that range. I am still holding out hope for the Xfusion single crown 160mm fork to make its way to production, but I will be surprised if it actually makes it that far.

  9. #9
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    The halson had slots in the uppers for the brace, it was a pretty bad design and idea. This is much more like the cannondale Moto fork.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  10. #10
    PMK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The halson had slots in the uppers for the brace, it was a pretty bad design and idea. This is much more like the cannondale Moto fork.
    Which Moto fork are you referring too? The Moto 100 which is basically a double Lefty and was the basis / prototype for the Lefty, or the Moto 120, which is very similar to any plain old USD fork out there. Guessing the Moto 120.

    Yes the Halson had slots and if I recall correctly also was an elastomer only fork. Back then it also had a standard 9mm axle and QR but I may be wrong about that. The design if redone could still retain the slotted upper tubes, but run a double seal per each leg, holding a reservoir of fluid for the bushings and seals. Basically a through shaft set of telescopic legs, secured at each extreme end.

    After some thought about the number of already available or produced USD forks others came to mind. Some were / are very good. I worked on a Foes F1 years ago. That was pretty nice. The Cannondale Moto 120 was promising but limited to the silly Sachs brake. I worked on an early Risse, again not bad for the era. We can toss in the Cannondale Moto 100 which is by far the most structurally rigid fork ever, but plagued with stupid design / manufacturing concerns, and relied on the elastomer for progression. As already mentioned, Shivers have been around a while though I have never worked on one that I recall.

    As a carry over from the moto world, the two main concerns for owners of USD forks, leaky fork seals and pinching the upper tube thereby binding the fork (lower triple clamp torques are super critical), outside that it is most common to hear complaints of them being too stiff structurally and beating up the rider.

    PK
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  11. #11
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    Hanabroke, err I mean Hanabrink. I would have had a lot more fun and a lot less stress and a better fork if I would have just burned that $600.
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  12. #12
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    Then there was Maverick, never tried one of those.
    '96 San Andreas
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    Incoming: 2008 Lotus Exige S 240
    '12 Toy FJ TT
    '05 Cooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
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  13. #13
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by PMK View Post
    Which Moto fork are you referring too? The Moto 100 which is basically a double Lefty and was the basis / prototype for the Lefty, or the Moto 120, which is very similar to any plain old USD fork out there. Guessing the Moto 120.
    Nope, the 100, with the big "cow brace" up front. Look closely at it, it's an "inverted" fork with a big brace as part of the dropouts...kind of. With only 100mm of travel and two headshock needle-bearing units, it was more momentously stupid than anything else, but the idea of a brace somehow coming from the "bottom" of the fork is the idea. The halson idea is much more of a trainwreck, for lubrication, upper rigidity, interfaces, etc. Probably better than the mag21s and other forks of the time (holy crap those things were dangerous!), but still just a trainwreck. We didn't get a good chassi until marzocchi did the bomber thing in 97.

    The DVO has some cool features, now that they've come out with some of the info, but they are now going against marzocchi 888s with clones of the avalanche cartridge (minus a couple features) and you can still go get an avy cartridge for many current forks and have the same damping setup that DVO is using, for far cheaper. Fox and RS both make pretty darn good damping systems finally, all sharing the same basic principles, and all of these forks have chassis with better strength/stiffness to weight than the inverted, but with exotic engineering you can somewhat level the playing field, it just makes it hard to break into the market. It's going to be an uphill battle.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  14. #14
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    If you look close at the axle, it looks to be splined on the ends. I believe Manitou has a patent on the "hex lock" axle design which is what makes the Dorado the stiffest USD fork to date.(arguably anyway). I wonder it this is DVO's way around Manitou Patent.

    As much as I like the damper design of X fusion and DVO are bringing to the table, I would personally still take a TPC+ cartridge over any other available options.

  15. #15
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    Looks amazing, but already have an amazing fork ('4 Dorado with TPC+) so will have to wait until this one dies.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

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