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  1. #1
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    DHX Air. Small can vs small boost chamber

    If you wanted a more progressive shock, what's the difference between using a small can and just running the boost chamber a minimum volume? Are they sort of meant to have a similar effect?

  2. #2
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    Spring vs. damper. It's been awhile since I had a DHX but as I recall there was much more of a pronounced effect changing the spring rate vs. running the minimum chamber size. BV air pressure has a descent effect on dampning force.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolatt View Post
    If you wanted a more progressive shock, what's the difference between using a small can and just running the boost chamber a minimum volume? Are they sort of meant to have a similar effect?
    Yes and no....running too much pressure or less volume on the boost valve, to compensate for the air spring, can make it feel too harsh. Do the float air spacers fit in the DHX air? If so I would try those.

    I had a DHX Air and swapped the aircan and it did what was advertised, but I didn't like it. It really changed the feel of the shock.

    I just added a spacer to my current shock, a RP23, and it improved it nicely.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuck_tacoma View Post
    . Do the float air spacers fit in the DHX air?
    They do not.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolatt View Post
    They do not.
    Another option is removing the outer can and shimming that. A lot of people have had success with that. Or the smaller aircan.

    Definitely mess around with the boost pressure and volume, that's what it's meant for. But if it gets too harsh and you still havn't found what your looking for then try the air spring.

  6. #6
    PMK
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    Really, so much of the air can volume and sizing is related to the bike chassis design itself. You need to use the air can volume to obtain the best performance on small and medium bumps.

    The boost pressure and volume work best to tune the bottoming control ramp up.

    You could try and work a compromise setting with the boost control only, but it has not worked to 100% in my applications.

    The problem of air can volume selection is compounded by the chassis design in regards to if the the chassis is coil spring based or air spring based. Coil spring based designs tend to build progression into the suspension geometry whereas air spring designs count on the volume to pressure curve to gain progression.

    The best way to get an initial setting. Set the air can pressure for a workable sag. Set the boost pressure at 150 and one turn in from max volume. Go ride and see how the bike works in mid sized and smaller bumps. If it wallows run more air pressure and less sag. When you find a pressure that doesn't wallow, see if any sag exists. Then do the same for the small volume air can. Once small and medium bump performance is dialed in, then manage bottoming control. Consider that changes to the boost pressure will slightly alter or may not the air can base pressure.

    I try to stick with a 150 boost pressure and build the valving and air spring volume and pressure based on the 150 and not change it.

    PK
    Reps! We don't need no stickin' reps!

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