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  1. #1
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    Dart better than 13-year-old Indy S fork?

    I'm sure this is a common story...

    Was going to upgrade my 13-year-old Raleigh hardtail with a new fork, wheelset and other goodies, but after tallying the costs, I decided to get a new FS instead.

    MTBR advice convinced me to keep the old hardtail for commuting.

    Question: Would it be worth my $150 or so to dump the Indy S (about 1.5 inches of travel) for a new Dart?

    Or would the difference not be noticeable on the road?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Huckin' trails
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    Dart 2 worth the price, even more if you get one on eBay for $100 with shipping...

    But they have quite some travel (3") compared to the Indy, so you might wanna stay with the Indy, unless you plan on jumping sidewalk or hitting bad condition roads.

    Indy and quadra fork are very good and easy to take care of and maintenance, so for commuting only, I say keep the Indy and save the cash for later.

    I have a Dart 2 (urban winter riding), but unless you really want it, don't bought it. I also have a quadra 5 and. It's still holding strong. I actuality took it all apart yesterday and everything was like new, so keep it and put the bucks back in the cookie jar for later.

    David

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    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  3. #3
    TNC
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    Man, I normally despise Indys, Jetts, etc. due to their spindly, wimpy chassis. However, your needs for a commuter that sound like will be on pavement, perhaps the Indy will be more than adequate for that. Why install a noticeably heavier fork with more travel than you need for pavement commuting?...unless the pavement will be in Tripoli, Libya with the frequent bomb crater to deal with. I built this goofy franken-hybrid commuter and used my old Indy, and it was quite decent for pavement and even the occasional smooth dirt road. If any rougher work is required on your commute, then I'd recommend the Dart.
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  4. #4
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    I'd dump an Indy S for a rigid if all I was using it was for the road and light trail duty.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the responses! Great advice.

    Follow-up question: What advantage would buying and installing a rigid fork have over keeping the Indy that's already on the bike? Lighter weight?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by M-80 Rider View Post
    Thanks for the responses! Great advice.

    Follow-up question: What advantage would buying and installing a rigid fork have over keeping the Indy that's already on the bike? Lighter weight?
    Lighter, much stiffer, more efficient (not that a 1.5" fork bobs much to start with).

    There is nothing wrong with leaving the Indy on there, but for road use, a rigid would be better, IMO.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72 View Post
    I'd dump an Indy S for a rigid if all I was using it was for the road and light trail duty.
    This! All day long!

    A rigid will be cheaper, lighter, and will pedal better.

  8. #8
    TNC
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    Quote Originally Posted by M-80 Rider View Post
    Thanks for the responses! Great advice.

    Follow-up question: What advantage would buying and installing a rigid fork have over keeping the Indy that's already on the bike? Lighter weight?
    I think you've answered your own question. You already have a working Indy. Why not use it. Here's another thing. It seems many are enthralled with rigid bikes these days. It's a free country, and people can ride whatever they want. My choice is always more comfort unless comfort absolutely needs to be sacrificed or jettisoned for absolute performance. Will you be racing your commuter? Will you be leaving so late from home to work or another destination that you need the few seconds you might save under maximum output on the ride to your destination? If absolute speed and time savings do not have to be cut that closely, why not be comfortable? You'll notice that crazy commuter I built even has a Cane Creek Thudbuster. Let me tell you...this bike is comfortable, and yet it's still reasonably fast for a hybrid/commuter. Why suffer? And if it's not really suffering to ride a rigid, it's more comfortable to at least have a fork for sure. I ride some rough secondary roads in my home area. While they are paved, they have lots of patches, frost heaves, cracks, and irregular sections. The fork and Thudbuster keep things smooth. It's your bike and your choice. Maybe you can try riding your bike built up as a commuter with the Indy. If you end up not liking it, you can always go rigid. What do you have to lose?

  9. #9
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    The indy S is an elastomer (not even MCU) fork with about 35mm of travel. The elastomers won't move fast enough in the cold to work.

    If you were in california it would be okay as a commuter, otherwise it's going to be rigid for half the year anyway. But I'm not a fan of the dart forks either.
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  10. #10
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    Darts are going the way of the dodo... Rockshox is dropping them in '12 lineup and replacing with "XC 32". I haven't ridden your bike but I doubt I would spend the money to upgrade the fork... I'd stash it away for a new ride. But if you are considering it, I'd hold off to see what the XC32's bring new to the table, and their pricepoint. At the very least, the prices of Darts will probably drop.

  11. #11
    TNC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dougal View Post
    The indy S is an elastomer (not even MCU) fork with about 35mm of travel. The elastomers won't move fast enough in the cold to work.

    If you were in california it would be okay as a commuter, otherwise it's going to be rigid for half the year anyway. But I'm not a fan of the dart forks either.
    Elastomer? Not mine. I have Englund air carts in mine.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC View Post
    Elastomer? Not mine. I have Englund air carts in mine.
    Indy S was single sided Elastomer with 48mm travel (Quadra 5 replacement)

    Indy C was Elastomer and Coil (Type II) and 63mm travel

    Indy XC got butted stanchions, MCU/Coil (Type II) spring and the option of 75mm for a super noodle experience

    Indy SL got taperwall Easton stanchions and steerer, less than 3 lbs of noodle fork (I owned one for a month, it seemed cool until I rode it).

    England cartridges did improve the travel but of course did nothing for the stiffness which was fine if you weighed a buck-twenty or less.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC View Post
    Elastomer? Not mine. I have Englund air carts in mine.
    The S and the SL are about as different as one fork chassis can be. At one time I considered buying the indy SL. Mainly for weight reasons. Glad I saw sense.

    BTW the 48mm (claimed) of the indy S was only possible if you crank up the preload and complete compress the topout springs. As delivered they only have 35mm.
    Owner of www.shockcraft.co.nz and NZ Manitou Service Agent.
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  14. #14
    TNC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dougal View Post
    The S and the SL are about as different as one fork chassis can be. At one time I considered buying the indy SL. Mainly for weight reasons. Glad I saw sense.

    BTW the 48mm (claimed) of the indy S was only possible if you crank up the preload and complete compress the topout springs. As delivered they only have 35mm.
    LOL!...very true. The Indy/Jett series was a joke. Hard to believe in that same era were forks that must have 500% stronger...at least. BTW, I didn't purchase that Indy SL of mine. It laid around the shop for years until I just took it home one day, and it already had those Englund carts in it. I will say it makes a darned good road fork in somewhat the same vein as the RS Ruby SL road fork...of which I also have on a Trek Y-Foil. I'm not much into road riding, but when I do I want something comfortable and offbeat.

  15. #15
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    My commuter has an 80mm manitou mars air. Quite a nice fork for 80mm and very light.
    Shame I can't commute any-more, working from an office at home has it's downsides.
    Owner of www.shockcraft.co.nz and NZ Manitou Service Agent.
    www.dougal.co.nz Suspension setup & tuning.
    SPV Devolve

  16. #16
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    Think I'll leave the Indy in place for the commutes.

    Money saved = more beer.

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