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  1. #1
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    Clyde Settings for Rebound and Damping on 2012 RP23

    It’s been just over a year that I got my 2012 TBC (Fox 120 up front and RP23 in the rear) and really feel like the bike is an extension of me. Although I am thrilled with how the bike rides, I want to take it to the next level though. I’m not taking advantage of tuning the suspension. Before I just go get it “pushed” I want to make sure I am getting the most out of VPP as is. I’d like to have an Idea of where to start with the damping and rebound for both front and back. I’ve messed around with it but there are so many potential combos and to be honest I always forget to document settings.

    I read recently that based on rider weight that there are truly only about 3 clicks of adjustment that are useable. Not sure if this is true or not. What/where are those 3 clicks for me? I really wish Fox would put some sort of guide out for rebound and damping based on rider weight.

    I am a 6’3” Clyde at 210lbs. and am running the recommended 25% sag If anyone can share what they think is optimal for XC/AM hardcore week-end warrior (no racing) riding mainly in So. Cal. it would be appreciated. I’m just looking for a good starting point other than “in the middle”. At 210lbs I would imagine that I would need to be on one end of the spectrum or another. I just want to set it and forget it… Is this why so many of you have gone the Push route?

  2. #2
    moaaar shimz
    Reputation: tacubaya's Avatar
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    How about trying the settings on the trail instead than on a forum? What suits one rider may not suit another one (even in the same weight class) because of the speed and style.

    I suggest riding a technical section of a trail and changing the rebound settings. After each run, write down how the setting felt. Keep going and at the end, choose the best one. Now you can use that setting as an "ideal" rebound and modify that setting +1 or -1 depending on the specific terrain.

  3. #3
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    I read that same article, and I think that "3 useable clicks" analogy might be a bit misleading. I would say that there are perhaps three useable clicks for a given rider on each terrain option they might encounter. For example, the ideal rebound settings for riding a dry, dusty cross country loop may well be more than three clicks away from someone speeding down a rocky DH section in soft sticky dirt.

    Tacubaya pretty much hit the nail on the head, but here are a few pointers:
    - Slower rebound will give you a more controlled, comfortable feeling for the most part. It will reduce suspension bob, keep you from getting bounced off bumps/landings, and keep your wheels from falling in to every little hole on the trail.
    - Slower rebound gives more traction in conditions that create slippery trails (either wet or dusty).
    - Faster rebound gives more traction over rough, rocky and washboard sections.
    - Faster rebound will keep your suspension from packing up over rough sections.
    - If you're an aggressive type rider, faster rebound gives the bike more pop and makes it more nimble.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by islandlife View Post
    It’s been just over a year that I got my 2012 TBC (Fox 120 up front and RP23 in the rear) and really feel like the bike is an extension of me. Although I am thrilled with how the bike rides, I want to take it to the next level though. I’m not taking advantage of tuning the suspension. Before I just go get it “pushed” I want to make sure I am getting the most out of VPP as is. I’d like to have an Idea of where to start with the damping and rebound for both front and back. I’ve messed around with it but there are so many potential combos and to be honest I always forget to document settings.

    I read recently that based on rider weight that there are truly only about 3 clicks of adjustment that are useable. Not sure if this is true or not. What/where are those 3 clicks for me? I really wish Fox would put some sort of guide out for rebound and damping based on rider weight.

    I am a 6’3” Clyde at 210lbs. and am running the recommended 25% sag If anyone can share what they think is optimal for XC/AM hardcore week-end warrior (no racing) riding mainly in So. Cal. it would be appreciated. I’m just looking for a good starting point other than “in the middle”. At 210lbs I would imagine that I would need to be on one end of the spectrum or another. I just want to set it and forget it… Is this why so many of you have gone the Push route?
    I think that 3 click thing is bs. What tacubaya said is right, there is no easy way. Your ridding style, your weight, your trails are different and all of these effect suspension setup. You need to spend some thing meddling with it and get the rebound feel you like. What are your settings now? What don't you like specifically? You said the bike is like an extension of you, that makes it sound like your settings might be spot on as they are.

    Push will tune your shock, but don't take their word for it. Trust yourself. To truly get the suspension the way you like, it takes work.
    On MTBR, the reputation is infamous.

  5. #5
    What?
    Reputation: mullen119's Avatar
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    The 3 clicks they are talking about in that article doesnt mean only 3 clicks are the range for everyone. It means that 3 clicks for any given rider would be the sweet spot that gives the best performance. When you leave that 3-4 click range, there starts to be compromises to the performance(suspension tuning is always a compromise but the compromise gets bigger) The sweet spot will be different for me(150lbs) then someone that weighs 200lbs. When you add in leverage ratios for rear shocks and terrain, the 3 click sweet spot can differ for everyone, even when comparing similar set ups. Its a great article, but can be very confusing when taken out of context.

    As Tacubaya said, ride and test to find your setting. Its the only way to find what works for you. Once you find your setting, I bet you wont want to go more the a click in either direction(that would be your 3 click sweet spot)

    If you send a shock to Push, they will valve your rebound specifically for you and give you a rebound setting that (most people say) is spot on. The HSR shim stack is actually valved to work best at that setting.

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