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  1. #1
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    Almost no compression on my Manitou Splice fork

    I have a Manitou Splice fork that I believe is a 2005 OEM model. It has the variable 100 - 130 travel adjustment, along with rebound adjustment.

    I had it serviced at the LBS a few months ago, and it works fine. Well, except for the fact that I can easily use all of the travel on a commuter ride on smooth pavement. An out of the saddle acceleration can easily do that. I am no lightweight (225 lbs), but still, this is ridiculous.

    The sag is fine (about an inch or so). The shop says that they use 7.5 weight oil for fork service. The manual recommends 5 weight. I am thinking that I'd be better off draining the oil and replacing it using 15 weight oil.

    What can I do to get this fork to be not so brutally soft of a ride?

    Thank you for your time.

  2. #2
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    Fluid Flow damper isn't going to like that heavy of an oil - going to spike in rough terrain. Run a stiffer spring or look into a fork w/ a better damper. 225lb you should be running an x-firm spring.

  3. #3
    Single(Pivot)and Happy
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    Everything keen says is spot on. Check your fluid levels. Manitou uses Motorex Racing Fork Oil, 5wt stock in the damper and Motorex Synthetic 5w40 for splash lube.

    Your weight, as keen states, requires an x-firm spring.
    The suspension of your bike sucks if it's different than mine. Really. It sucks. Big time.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boulder Pilot View Post
    Everything keen says is spot on. Check your fluid levels. Manitou uses Motorex Racing Fork Oil, 5wt stock in the damper and Motorex Synthetic 5w40 for splash lube.

    Your weight, as keen states, requires an x-firm spring.
    I appreciate both of you getting back to me on this.

    Not to be argumentative, but I thought that the spring was strictly for control of sag, and that compression adjustment (whether mechanical or fluid) was to control how fast the suspension went through its travel. If the sag is fine at a standstill, then isn't the compression at fault?

    Incidentally, what would qualify as a fork with a better damper. A less expensive fork, that is.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikedreamer View Post
    I appreciate both of you getting back to me on this.

    Not to be argumentative, but I thought that the spring was strictly for control of sag, and that compression adjustment (whether mechanical or fluid) was to control how fast the suspension went through its travel. If the sag is fine at a standstill, then isn't the compression at fault?

    Incidentally, what would qualify as a fork with a better damper. A less expensive fork, that is.

    You have Fluid Flow dampning which is a fixed restriction. Add enough compression (thicker oil) to noticeably slow suspension movement and it will pack up . You can add low speed compression (a fork that has this adjustment) to control the pedal induced bobbing) this assumes you have the correct spring rate. Sag is just starting point not an end all step to having the correct rate spring. What rate spring do you have installed ? The spring rate is a primary adjustment and the compression fine tunes the ride. A better damper would have a shim stack.
    Last edited by keen; 08-17-2012 at 12:34 AM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen View Post
    You have Fluid Flow dampning which is a fixed restriction. Add enough compression (thicker oil) to noticeably slow suspension movement and it will pack up . You can add low speed compression (a fork that has this adjustment) to control the pedal induced bobbing) this assumes you have the correct spring rate. Sag is just starting point not an end all step to having the correct rate spring. What rate spring do you have installed ? The spring rate is a primary adjustment and the compression fine tunes the ride. A better damper would have a shim stack.
    I think I understand what you're saying, keen, and I thank you for the advice. I'm going to assume that the fork has the original factory OEM spring, but I haven't taken it apart to confirm that.

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