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  1. #1
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    30 hr. suspension fluid service on a 2011 36 Talas RLC?

    Has anyone ever done this "simple" service? All the Fox tutorials I see are for different models, and they appear to disassemble more than is necessary.

    Anyone care to create a youtube tutorial? I asked an LBS and they want $50 to do it. I can't afford to pay $50 every two weeks to have my fork serviced.

    Thanks for any help.
    Last edited by happyriding; 06-26-2013 at 12:06 PM.

  2. #2
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    I am taking a guess here as I am not looking at the manual but I presume you only need to change the splash oil in the legs that often. Even then, I would only do it every two months unless you ride a ton.

    It is very simple to do and can be accomplished with very basic tools and limited knowledge of anything mechanical. Just make sure you buy extra crush washers from fox as you should replace them every time you do this service. There are plenty of videos on the web showing how to do this. I believe competitive cyclist even has this basic service video on their website.

  3. #3
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    There are plenty of videos on the web showing how to do this.
    I've looked everywhere for instructions, and I haven't found any good info.

    I believe competitive cyclist even has this basic service video on their website.
    If you are talking about this:

    Competitive Cyclist shows you how to overhaul your Fox forks and shocks - YouTube

    it is old (before FIT), and it is incomplete.
    Last edited by happyriding; 11-30-2011 at 07:44 PM.

  4. #4
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    Here you go, quick and easy how-to from Mojo (offical UK Fox distributor):

    http://www.mojo.co.uk/media%20pix/ForkFlyerWeb.pdf

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    Good Luck---taking that same maiden voyage myself--but with the float FIT 140mm--looks pretty straightforward--had to buy the 26mm online, anybody know where to get the cool syringes?? Measuring stuff?? 30ml of oil is only 1oz--weird

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    I've looked everywhere for instructions, and I haven't found any good info.


    If you are talking about this:

    Competitive Cyclist shows you how to overhaul your Fox forks and shocks - YouTube

    it is old (before FIT), and it is incomplete.
    Fit, no fit, new, old, same thing if you are just trying to change your splash oil. Undo nuts on bottom of legs; pull down slightly, put in new oil using some form of measuring device, put nuts back on with new crush washer. Fit refers to the damper and has absolutely nothing to do with changing the splash oil. Or just go to Fox's site and pull down instructions if you don't believe competitive cyclist or me.

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    You shouldn’t need a 26mm (32mm for 36 forks) socket for regular servicing - that is only needed for removing the top caps for removing the damper assembly and/or spring assembly, which is only required for more major services.
    Oil bath service with a seal clean and lube should be done as per the mojo PDF. If you only want to change the oil, you don’t even need to separate the uppers and lowers, just change the oil through the bolt holes in the bottom of the lowers.

    36's are the same as 32's in this respect. Just remove bottom nuts/RC2 adjusters etc. and tap on the bottom bolts to loosen them.

    For syringes, ask google syringe - Google Search
    Or find them on bestofferbuy, dealextreme or Ebay
    I got mine from bestofferbuy
    Search Results : Electronic Gadgets, Home Gifts & Unusual Novelty Gifts - BestOfferBuy
    Last edited by gravelrash08; 12-02-2011 at 04:31 AM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trackho View Post
    Good Luck---taking that same maiden voyage myself
    Thanks.

    had to buy the 26mm online,
    Who sells the ground down sockets? Or are you going to grind it down yourself?

    anybody know where to get the cool syringes??
    When I was working on my hydro brakes, I bought syringes in various sizes at a veterinary supply store for under $1 a piece. Then find the smallest clear plastic tubing available to fit the nipple on the syringe, which I think is 1/8". 1/8" is not a very tight fit, so you have to mind the connection.

    30ml of oil is only 1oz--weird
    The more oil, the heavier the fork.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithrider View Post
    Fit, no fit, new, old, same thing if you are just trying to change your splash oil. Undo nuts on bottom of legs; pull down slightly, put in new oil using some form of measuring device, put nuts back on with new crush washer.
    Okay. I'll give it a try.

    My next problem: who sells crush washers for Talas 36mm forks? I think Talas forks have a plastic crush washer that goes on one leg, and an aluminum crush washer that goes on the other leg. I can't find the crush washers at the Fox store.

    Also, can I use the red Fox 10wt oil as the bath oil instead of the green 10wt? JensonUSA gave me bad advice and sold me the red instead of the green that I need.
    (Edit. Not recommended here: fox green 10wt, looking for substitute)

    And while I'm doing all this should I go ahead and install the new SKF seals? I only see 32mm SKF seals offered at the Fox store.
    (Edit. Available at JensonUSA: Fox Shox Low Friction Seals at JensonUSA.com)

    Thanks.
    Last edited by happyriding; 12-02-2011 at 01:46 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithrider View Post
    Fit, no fit, new, old, same thing if you are just trying to change your splash oil. Undo nuts on bottom of legs; pull down slightly, put in new oil using some form of measuring device, put nuts back on with new crush washer. Fit refers to the damper and has absolutely nothing to do with changing the splash oil. Or just go to Fox's site and pull down instructions if you don't believe competitive cyclist or me.
    If it's not the sealed damper, then you need to empty the damper of oil as well, otherwise you'll overfill it.

  11. #11
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    You should be able to reuse the crush washers. I have yet to replace a crush washer and there have never been leaks from the reused washers. If you need them, Fox sells them. Just give them a call. I would suggest ordering several things to justify shipping. Or check your LBS.

    As for syringes, I picked up a couple at a pharmacy. They have a few sizes. You can get water line/hose that fits the tips from a hardware store or Lowe's/Home Depot.

    While not truly necessary, it might not be a bad idea to take a peak at the top of the air piston. Some folks are experiencing oil migration from the lowers to the top of the piston. I remove my top cap using a tool from here:
    Lunar Bike Tools

    A socket will allow you to use a torque wrench but I haven't had a problem using these yet. You should have 5cc (or less, just enough to cover the piston) of Float fluid on top of the air piston.

    As for fork seals, I typically don't replace them til they leak.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    If it's not the sealed damper, then you need to empty the damper of oil as well, otherwise you'll overfill it.
    On '09 and newer 36's (09 non fit), I have never had the need to do damper service everytime I add splash oil to lower leg. Could be wrong on this. This is definitely not the case with his 2010.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheatgerm View Post
    You should be able to reuse the crush washers. I have yet to replace a crush washer and there have never been leaks from the reused washers.
    Okay.

    While not truly necessary, it might not be a bad idea to take a peak at the top of the air piston. Some folks are experiencing oil migration from the lowers to the top of the piston. I remove my top cap using a tool from here:
    Lunar Bike Tools
    Nice. Thanks. lol, shipping is more than the tool!

    A socket will allow you to use a torque wrench but I haven't had a problem using these yet. You should have 5cc (or less, just enough to cover the piston) of Float fluid on top of the air piston.

    As for fork seals, I typically don't replace them til they leak.
    Okay.

    Thanks for the tips.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corvette View Post
    Here you go, quick and easy how-to from Mojo (offical UK Fox distributor):

    http://www.mojo.co.uk/media%20pix/ForkFlyerWeb.pdf
    Thanks. It looks like that is the best there is.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheatgerm View Post
    While not truly necessary, it might not be a bad idea to take a peak at the top of the air piston. Some folks are experiencing oil migration from the lowers to the top of the piston. I remove my top cap using a tool from here:
    Lunar Bike Tools
    Which fork leg is the air piston in?

    A socket will allow you to use a torque wrench but I haven't had a problem using these yet. You should have 5cc (or less, just enough to cover the piston) of Float fluid on top of the air piston.

    As for fork seals, I typically don't replace them til they leak.

  16. #16
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    Left leg - the one with the air valve on top. The other leg, non-air leg, is the one with the rebound, compression and lockout levers (you may not have all 3).

    On second note, I noticed you are running a TALAS fork. I am not sure how the air piston assembly works in that fork.

    May want to check here:

    WebHelp
    Last edited by wheatgerm; 12-07-2011 at 04:58 PM.

  17. #17
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    Thanks a lot.

    Do the rebound and compression settings have to be dialed all the way in/out before starting the service? I assume I have to let all the air out of the fork.

  18. #18
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    No, you may just want to note where they are at in case you turn the adjusters mistakenly.

    Also, I edited my post above. The TALAS air assembly is different. Thus checking the amount of fluid on the air piston is/may be different. Check the link I have added above.

    Servicing the lower splash fluid is not different though.

  19. #19
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    Thanks. I've looked all over the Fox tech service Webhelp, and I have no idea what does and doesn't apply to my 2011 Fox 36 Talas RLC fork, so unless I get a link to a specific page, I have no idea what you are referring to.

  20. #20
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    Well, it looks like the 2011 TALAS is considered "Talas III". Look under 2010-2012 Parts Catalog, 2011 Fork Parts, 2011 36 TALAS 160, 2011 36 TALAS 160 Parts Specifications Master Sheet, 2011 36 TALAS 160 Spring Side Small Parts PNs and note the TALAS III note.

    OK, next, go to Service, Forks, 36 mm TALAS III Spring Service. Here's your service instructions. Doesn't seem to be too difficult. Way easier than the older Talas systems. Note, TALAS III Outer Tube: Disassembly is only necessary if you suspect TALAS adjuster tube issues, such as travel steps not properly adjusting or evidence of travel creep.

    You should be set now.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheatgerm View Post
    Well, it looks like the 2011 TALAS is considered "Talas III". Look under 2010-2012 Parts Catalog, 2011 Fork Parts, 2011 36 TALAS 160, 2011 36 TALAS 160 Parts Specifications Master Sheet, 2011 36 TALAS 160 Spring Side Small Parts PNs....
    I got there, but I don't know where this is:

    and note the TALAS III note.
    OK, next, go to Service, Forks, 36 mm TALAS III Spring Service. Here's your service instructions. Doesn't seem to be too difficult. Way easier than the older Talas systems. Note, TALAS III Outer Tube: Disassembly is only necessary if you suspect TALAS adjuster tube issues, such as travel steps not properly adjusting or evidence of travel creep.

    You should be set now.
    I've decided I won't be do anything on that page unless I'm forced to. At this point, I can't imagine ever owning a Fox fork again.

  22. #22
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    All modern forks out there require regular maintenance. It won't be any different with a different manufacturer.

  23. #23
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    Dude, as a new owner of this fork I think you are worrying and stressing way too much.

    Most of what you are looking at only needs doing every few years, and should probably be carried out by a professional service centre in any case. Basically, anything that involves fiddling with the TALAS assembly or FIT damper should be left well alone on such a new fork.

    The one bit you have already done, ie lubing the foam seals, is probably the only job that really needs doing regularly, and that probably only every six months. However, it probably is nearly as easy to pull the lowers all the way off and change the oil while you are at it.

    You keep asking about finding the correct service info for your fork, but as has already been said, for the purposes of an oil change, they really are all the same. Undo the bottom nuts, tap the bolts loose. Pull down on the lowers. Change oil and reassemble.

    My advice is DO NOT buy a 32mm socket. Leave those bits of your fork alone for the next couple years at least. Put some lube (eg fox float fluid or finish line wet lube) on your fork stanchions after every ride, then pump the forks a couple of times and wipe all the gunk off with a cloth. Never point a hosepipe at your fork stanchions. Take off the lowers to change oil and lube the foam rings once every 6 months or so. Job done.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by gravelrash08 View Post
    The one bit you have already done, ie lubing the foam seals, is probably the only job that really needs doing regularly, and that probably only every six months...Put some lube (eg fox float fluid or finish line wet lube) on your fork stanchions after every ride, then pump the forks a couple of times and wipe all the gunk off with a cloth. Never point a hosepipe at your fork stanchions. Take off the lowers to change oil and lube the foam rings once every 6 months or so. Job done.
    Maintenance for Fox forks goes off riding hours, not the calendar. The Fox 36 should have its bath oil changed every 30 hours of riding. Also, as has already been covered in several other threads, wet lube should not be used on the stanchions as it will only attract dirt and can actually carry dirt past the wiper.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    Maintenance for Fox forks goes off riding hours, not the calendar. The Fox 36 should have its bath oil changed every 30 hours of riding. Also, as has already been covered in several other threads, wet lube should not be used on the stanchions as it will only attract dirt and can actually carry dirt past the wiper.
    I hear what you are saying, but was trying to simplify the situation. I know I change my oil much less often than 30hrs riding, but I am very careful about how I clean my bike and lubing the stanchions

    Regarding wet seals, this video claims otherwise - Mojo Suspension Hoodoo Ltd: The UK's Only Authorised Fox Racing Shox Warranty & Service Centre

    And I did also say to wipe the gunk off afterwards.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by gravelrash08 View Post
    I hear what you are saying, but was trying to simplify the situation. I know I change my oil much less often than 30hrs riding, but I am very careful about how I clean my bike and lubing the stanchions

    Regarding wet seals, this video claims otherwise - Mojo Suspension Hoodoo Ltd: The UK's Only Authorised Fox Racing Shox Warranty & Service Centre

    And I did also say to wipe the gunk off afterwards.
    Yeah, same here. I generally try to get people, if anything, to service their forks more often than required. More maintenance never hurt a fork, and with the small amount of bath oil in modern forks, damage can happen fairly quickly.

    Mojo might recommend it, but I haven't found anyone else who does, and quite a few people who don't. If you want to use lubricant on your stanchion, the best thing to use is the Finish Line fluoro stanchion lube, since it leaves no residue behind.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    If you want to use lubricant on your stanchion, the best thing to use is the Finish Line fluoro stanchion lube, since it leaves no residue behind.
    Cool, stuff designed for the job. Gotta be better.

    Also, this link leads to a good illustration of the "every ride" maintenance I was trying to describe - whatever brand of forks we might be talking about
    Cleaning Your Suspension

  28. #28
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    I finally acquired all the necessary items, and today I did the 30 hour suspension fluid service. A couple of notes that might help somebody else:

    A) Use safety goggles so that you don't get any suspension fluid in your eyes if something goes wrong. Use vinyl gloves. Some of the tutorials show the guys using their bare hands, but I've read that Fox Float Fluid and Fox 10wt Green Suspension Fluid contain some pretty noxious chemicals.

    1) Let all the air out of your fork. Rebound and compression settings can remain where they are.

    2) Free your front brake cable from the fork leg guide. Then I chose to take off my grip and slide the front brake lever off my bars. That allowed me to pull the lowers off my fork.

    3) Getting the lowers off is not easy. I was able to remove both bottom nuts(10mm and 15mm) easily with sockets. The nuts are not tight at all, and a standard Stanley socket engages the nut fine--it does not need to be ground down to remove the lead in chamfer(like with a 32mm socket for the top cap on the fork legs). You could also use a closed or open end wrench if you wanted to. However, a socket can be used in conjunction with a torque wrench when you retighten the nut to spec. A socket is also useful for another reason...

    I had my bike turned upside down, and I could not pull the lowers off after unscrewing both bottom nuts. So after removing the plastic crush washer from under the 15mm nut (which came off the fork leg that had the red rebound knob on it), I screwed the 15mm nut back on the silver fitting. If you forget which nut came off which leg, the 15mm nut goes on the silver fitting, and the 10mm nut goes on the gold fitting.

    One tutorial says to screw the 15mm nut on at least 2 turns, another one says to screw the nut on at least half way. In any case, there is a nipple that protrudes out of the middle of the 15mm nut, so if you don't have a socket, there is no way to whack the nut without hitting the nipple. Also, I removed the socket from the socket wrench and placed it over the 15mm nut, so that I wasn't hitting the socket wrench with my rubber mallet. Then I started whacking away on the socket--medium hard at first, then almost as hard as I could, but I couldn't free the lowers.

    Without air in the fork, you can move the lowers up and down, so I tried hammering on the socket with the lowers in various positions. I ended up pushing the lowers all the way down(compressing the fork), and finally after one of my attempts at whacking the socket, the nut was driven downwards into contact with the bottom of the fork leg, i.e. the lowers broke free. Then I removed the 15mm nut, and I could slide the lowers off.

    4) A decent amount of oil came out of the lowers when I pulled them off, so have some paper towels ready to hold under the dust wipers.

    5) There were some rings tumbling around inside the lowers. I thought they were the foam rings that normally reside under the dust wipers. So I broke off a piece of a plastic hanger and used that to prod one of the rings towards the dust wiper and out of the lowers. But when the ring fell out, it wasn't the foam ring after all. It was a black rubber ring. So I pushed it back into the fork leg. None of the tutorials I read mentioned those black rubber rings, so if you see them tumbling around in your lowers, just leave them alone.

    6) You can pull out the foam rings under the dust wipers using a toothpick or something similar--without having to remove the dust wipers themselves. It is a lot easier to just remove the foam rings, clean them with Fox Green 10wt Suspension Fluid, squeeze them dry, then soak them in Fox Float Fluid, and reinsert them below the dust wipers.

    7) Before starting work on the foam rings, I turned my bike right side up, and I let the fork drip oil into a bucket with paper towels in it After soaking the foam rings in Fox Float Fluid and reinserting them below the dust wipers, I flipped my bike upside down again. But when I slid the lowers back on, the silver fitting (the one with the 15mm nut that I was whacking with a mallet) didn't protrude out the end of the fork leg, so I had nothing to screw the 15mm nut onto.

    I slid the lowers off again, and I pulled on the silver fitting and it extended further. I noticed that some Fox Float Fluid got on one of the rods, so I set down the lowers, and I wiped the rod down with isopropyl alcohol to get the Float Fluid off. Then I slid the lowers on again, and this time the silver fitting extended through the bottom of the fork leg, and I could install both bottom nuts.

    8) I used a syringe that had graduated markings on the side, which I bought at a veterinary supply store, to measure the Fox Green 10wt Suspension Fluid. I removed the plunger and I used the syringe like a beaker. I put my finger over the nipple, poured in the correct amount of Fox Green 10wt Suspension Fluid, then I removed my finger from the nipple and let the syringe drip into the fork leg.

    9) The fork leg with the red rebound nob (and silver fitting), which had the 15mm nut on it, had a black plastic crush washer under the nut, which I reused. The fork leg with the gold fitting had an aluminum washer under the 10mm nut, which I also reused. You can't mix the washers up because they are different sizes corresponding to the 15mm nut and the 10mm nut. Both washers fit in a recess in the bottom of the nut.

    Plenty of green suspension fluid ran out of my fork, so I was happy to see that. I read a post that said some Fox forks come with very little "splash" oil in the forks. The green suspension fluid was pristinely clean as well, and my dust wipers still had some Float Fluid on them--unlike the first time I serviced them when they were completely dry.

    After getting everything back together, my fork appeared to be working normally. The Talas setting and the lockout feature both work as they should. I'll check tomorrow to see if any oil is leaking out of the bottom of the fork.


    ====
    2011 Fox 36 Talas RLC

    Air side of fork(the one that has the valve you use your shock pump on, and the Talas adjust, and when you get the bottom nut off there is a gold fitting): 15ml Fox 10wt Green Suspension Fluid

    Damper side of fork(there is a red rebound knob on the bottom of the fork leg, and when you get the bottom nut off there is a silver fitting): 30 ml Fox 10wt Green Suspension Fluid

    Bottom nuts: 5-6 Nm
    Last edited by happyriding; 12-09-2011 at 08:58 PM.

  29. #29
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    Glad you got it sorted out.
    In the future, you don't need to remove the air to do the bath oil service.
    If fact, when you remove the air it makes it harder to install the lower left fixing nut, as you found out.
    It gets easier/faster everytime you do it.
    I've got mine down to about 15-20 minutes.

    Sent from my SCH-I510 using Tapatalk
    Last edited by savagemann; 12-09-2011 at 02:43 PM.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

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    Nice job dude. Like savagamann said, it's a job which just keeps getting easier, and it's the key to keeping your fork working well.

  31. #31
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    konahonzo

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    Glad you got it taken care of. Hope you got the nice, satisfied feeling when you finished it up yourself!! You'll get better and faster with it the more you do it.

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    Good job.

    Not sure about this bit though:
    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    There were some rings tumbling around inside the lowers. I thought they were the foam rings that normally reside under the dust wipers. .... when ring fell out, it wasn't the foam ring ... It was a black rubber ring. So I pushed it back into the fork leg. .. if you see them tumbling around in your lowers, just leave them alone.

    I would generally advise against leaving random things to jiggle around loose inside your fork. I would also love to know what it is you found there, and where it had come from.

    And regarding this:
    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    I removed the plunger and I used the syringe like a beaker.
    Err, I usually find it easier to use a syringe like a syringe. The plunger is really good for slurping up oil and squirting it into the forks. Still, if it worked for you...


    Finally, and I know it is a bit late for you, but I found this video which shows every step in some detail.:
    Mojo Suspension Hoodoo Ltd: Step by Step fork maintenance video

  34. #34
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    My guess is they are bottom out bumpers.

    do they look like this?


  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by rupps5 View Post
    My guess is they are bottom out bumpers.

    do they look like this?
    ]
    Yes. I thought they might be bottom out bumpers, but I thought a bottom out bumper would be thicker.


    Finally, and I know it is a bit late for you, but I found this video which shows every step in some detail.:
    Thanks, I did see that at some point. I didn't particularly care for that tutorial because the camera is too far away, so I couldn't tell what the guy was doing; and I got confused when he said to make sure some mechanism didn't protrude past the bottom nut. On my fork, when I took off the red rebound knob, the nipple was already protruding past the bottom nut. There was no way to screw the bottom nut back on so that I could hit it with a mallet and not have the nipple protrude through the middle of the nut. In addition, if you use a 15mm socket, the 15mm socket has space through the middle of it, which allows you to fit the socket over the 15mm nut without hitting the nipple.

    I did pick up a few tips from that tutorial nonetheless, like having paper towels ready when you remove the lowers.

    Err, I usually find it easier to use a syringe like a syringe. The plunger is really good for slurping up oil and squirting it into the forks.
    I couldn't figure out how much oil would be contained in the clear plastic tubing I wanted to hook up to the syringe to suck up the oil. However, now that I think about it, I could have slurped up enough oil to reach the 40ml mark on the syringe, then squirted oil into the damper fork leg until the oil level dropped to the 10ml mark. Next time.

    No leaks. Yeah.

  36. #36
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    I have a question. I weigh 235 lbs with gear. To get 25% sag, my fork is set at 55 lbs, and my RP23 (w/ Boost Valve) is set at 220 lbs. The fork pressure is way lower than the recommended pressure for that weight, and the shock pressure is way higher than the recommended pressure. Does that indicate something might be wrong?

  37. #37
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    No, the shock sag is also a function of the leverage of the rear linkages so you may need to run higher or lower psi that recommend.

    The fork setting should be pretty close to spec.

  38. #38
    PMK
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    Happyriding, please go ride... stop doubting yourself and go spin the pedals.

    BTW, please lessen or remove the lead in on the sockets. With lead in, the impacts from hammering the rods loose places all the impact stress on the nuts outermost edge. They can crack. With the lead in chamfer removed, the impact stress is adjacent to the hex.

    Also, on thinner nuts like the 15mm and upper caps they are less apt to slip off.

    PK
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    Quote Originally Posted by PMK View Post
    BTW, please lessen or remove the lead in on the sockets. With lead in, the impacts from hammering the rods loose places all the impact stress on the nuts outermost edge. They can crack. With the lead in chamfer removed, the impact stress is adjacent to the hex.
    Huh? When you are pounding on the socket, the socket's lead in chamfer never contacts the nut. So if the lead in chamfer doesn't contact the nut, then how can removing the lead in chamfer protect the nut?
    Last edited by happyriding; 12-10-2011 at 06:52 PM.

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    I didn't know it wasn't necessary to remove the air from the TALAS. I asked that before my first oil change & the answer I got was to remove the air...

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    Quote Originally Posted by rupps5 View Post
    My guess is they are bottom out bumpers.
    Unfortunately, the bumpers were hanging sideways in the lowers after I slid the lowers off my fork. My bike was upside down when I slid the lowers off, so the lowers were upside down.

    I'm guessing when I slid the lowers back onto my fork, with my bike upside down once again, there was zero chance that the rods skewered the sideways hanging bumpers. That leads me to believe that you should slide the lowers back onto the fork with the fork right side up. That way the bumpers will naturally fall to the bottom of the fork legs and lie flat, and the rods will skewer them when you slide the lowers back on.

    I think I need to take my fork apart again. And I think that means all the oil is going to drain out.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by bitewerks View Post
    I didn't know it wasn't necessary to remove the air from the TALAS. I asked that before my first oil change & the answer I got was to remove the air...
    Did you really want to work on something under pressure to save 1 minute of pumping?

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Huh? When you are pounding on the socket, the socket's lead in chamfer never contacts the nut. So if the lead in chamfer doesn't contact the nut, then how can removing the lead in chamfer protect the nut?

    The nut is flanged, the socket / nut contact point when hammering is the nuts outside edge.

    Not that important to me, but some of the forks I have worked on were owner serviced prior to having me repair them. Do what works best for you.

    PK
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    Quote Originally Posted by PMK View Post
    The nut is flanged, the socket / nut contact point when hammering is the nuts outside edge.
    Yes, I see what you mean now. There is a ridge that protrudes around the bottom of the nut, and the socket's lead in chamfer jams against the ridge when you slide the socket on. One of the tutorials I read said to use an old 15mm nut as your hammering nut, and that must be why.

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    Quote Originally Posted by electrik View Post
    Did you really want to work on something under pressure to save 1 minute of pumping?
    Sure, might be fun!

    Obviously people are doing the work without bleeding the air out. Seems like I do remember the nut on the left leg being hard to start but never thought it was because of the lack of air.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by bitewerks View Post
    I didn't know it wasn't necessary to remove the air from the TALAS. I asked that before my first oil change & the answer I got was to remove the air...
    According to Fox:

    Do not disassemble 36 TALAS, TALAS, FLOAT, F-SERIES or FX forks without first depressurizing the air springs.
    Warnings & General Information

  47. #47
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    That's just a c.y.a. from fox.
    The air spring is a sealed cartridge that is separate from the lowers.
    There is really no need to remove the air for a simple bath oil service.
    Of course if you were going to remove the top cap to add float fluid you would need to remove the air.

    Sent from my SCH-I510 using Tapatalk
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    It is pretty easy, i did mine for the first time last week. Make sure you get good fork fluid replacement. I use Redline Suspension fluid 10W. The best on the market and is about $9.00 a pint.

  49. #49
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    Just did mine--unfortunately all my oil in the air spring side was above the air piston--so Ill have to sort that. Overall, pretty straightforward deal. Installed the SKF seals, and with no oil in my air chamber-the forks rock. Almost too supple, and I can easily use 90% of the travel, prolly need to add more air.

    Forks are FOX FIT RLC 140mm

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    You want some heavy oil in the air chamber for lubrication and sealing.

    It seems the consensus to keep oil from migrating into the air chamber is to remove the foam ring from the air piston.

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