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Thread: 2015 Fox 36

  1. #101
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    Video - Changing Compression Ratios

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    Does it not make sense to combine the new '15 Fox 36 with the CC Inline? Is this too much fork for not enough shock? Would I be better off (as maybe a Novice/ Intermediate rough trail rider) waiting for a new 34mm front to save some weight?

    I am riding bettter and since I have lots of MX experience I'm starting to become very aware of the cheap/ pogo like/ bottoms hard occasionally feel of the stock fork that came on my Bronson. It hinders front end traction.

  3. #103
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    2015 Fox 36

    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Does it not make sense to combine the new '15 Fox 36 with the CC Inline? Is this too much fork for not enough shock? Would I be better off (as maybe a Novice/ Intermediate rough trail rider) waiting for a new 34mm front to save some weight?

    I am riding bettter and since I have lots of MX experience I'm starting to become very aware of the cheap/ pogo like/ bottoms hard occasionally feel of the stock fork that came on my Bronson. It hinders front end traction.
    you are talking 36 fork so not really looking to save weight, why not get a cc dbair cs/fox 36?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post
    you are talking 36 fork so not really looking to save weight, why not get a cc dbair cs/fox 36?
    The new 36 is lighter (and obviously superior) than my current 34mm. I am starting to care a great deal about weight actually, but not over performance.

    My thinking on the Cane Creek dbair is that it's too much shock for my riding conditions. We have no downhill (that I know of) here in Texas. And when I make it to a park someday, I'll probably just rent a proper downhill bike. So I want my Bronson to just be the ultimate bike for my local conditions, which I think would be considered Enduro.

    I don't so much mind the price of the cc dbair, it's just that I would no longer be able to carry a water bottle, it weighs more (I don't love the weighty feel of my Bronson even with a top level build), and then it is more money too. Also, the rep at Cane Creek actually told me that he can do an entire downhill run on the inline shock and not overheat it, so I'm certainly not going to overheat it. Of course the fact that Santa Cruz chose a different valving spec for their cc dbair give me pause because the Bronson specific valving isn't available on the cc inline.

    When I ride my bike, the current 34 Fox fork feels like a cheap pogo stick. I'm not impressed with it.

    Maybe a used Pike and a new CC inline would be a better match for my application?

  5. #105
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    2015 Fox 36

    ^^^take a look at the bronson picture thread, there is someone riding the inline and will post some info on the bronson+inline...

    I'm also figuring the pike would be just fine without the extra cost for the upgrade!

  6. #106
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    I'm running mine (26" Float) at 140mm. The neg plate was screwed in with some real gorilla torque, so taking it off to add the spacers was quite an undertaking. Dropping the transfer shaft also required a bit more arm strength than I'd normally feel comfortable with on such a tiny screw.

    The fork is mounted on a Blur TRc. I'm running LSC 10 clicks from full open, rebound 8 clicks from full open. Still tuning HSC. I have 1 orange (10.8cc) and one blue (7.6cc) spacer in place, and my initial impression is that the fork may need a little bit more ramp-up given the dropped travel.

    The small-bump performance and stiffness are absolutely amazing. I'm changing my 32 FIT Float on my hardtail to the gold oil with the new seals to see how it compares with the new bath lube.

    One bummer: my Lunar Bikes fork top cap wrench does not quite clear the crown. Swapping volume spacers frequently looks like it merits grinding a socket.

  7. #107
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    2015 Fox 36

    @amxc: are there any pics from your Blur TRC with the 36? Thanks in advance

  8. #108
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    Anybody know if the '15 lowers would fit on the old uppers? I'm thinking of updating my old fork w/ a set of 27.5 lowers. It's okay if the travel is reduced a bit from 160 (say 140 or 135) as I'm pairing it w/ a short-shocked (128mm) 650b'd Blur LTc. I know the old 26er lowers will take a 650b wheel, but I'd like to get some Conti TK 27.5 rubber in there and still allow for some mud to clear
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  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    When I ride my bike, the current 34 Fox fork feels like a cheap pogo stick. I'm not impressed with it.

    Maybe a used Pike and a new CC inline would be a better match for my application?
    Try a new fork 1st. Plenty of riders have found a new fork actually helps fix shock issues by providing more balance between the two. Is your 34 a EVO or FIT?

  10. #110
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    Ok, here goes

    Float 36 180mm (26" wheel obviously)
    Liteville 601 (190mm) - Vivid Air R2C rear

    Rider weight - 185lbs
    No volume reducers in air chamber
    Air pressure 68-70psi
    13 clicks out of LSC, 15 HSC
    Rebound 2-3 clicks from wide open

    Ridden for about 2-3 weeks at home in UK, now "testing" them in Morzine.
    I'm a freerider (hate that term), but you won't find me on the doubles/ berms/ braking-bumps etc. I'm in the forest, in the mud, on the steep and rooty/ techy ****. This is where a fork's sensitivity without diving through it's travel is a hard balance to find. So far so good
    It's pissed-it down here for most of the summer, so the mud is at it's finest: Good grip and compliance over the roots, great torsional strength and on the odd occasional where I thought the fork was going to tuck under, it saved my ass from going over my tits.

    In comparison to the previous 180 Float (my last set of forks), the improvement is very very good: Had to run higher pressure and virtually no LSC/ HSC on that model to get sensitivity without nose-dive.

    highly recommended
    cheers
    Ade

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    Anybody know if the '15 lowers would fit on the old uppers? I'm thinking of updating my old fork w/ a set of 27.5 lowers. It's okay if the travel is reduced a bit from 160 (say 140 or 135) as I'm pairing it w/ a short-shocked (128mm) 650b'd Blur LTc. I know the old 26er lowers will take a 650b wheel, but I'd like to get some Conti TK 27.5 rubber in there and still allow for some mud to clear

    Have not mated them yet but I'll try to measure, originally wanted to do lowers swap on me van, but have to feel the air out (my first 36 air spring). Air won't ever have the same rebound response off the top as coil ( I like almost closed ), but it's very smooth and the RC2 LSR needle this year feels like finer/more range.

    Wipers are different this year. From the rings left, I can tell there's lube in there on the first ride..waiting to see how long it takes for stickyness to set in...
    ...

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deerhill View Post
    Have not mated them yet but I'll try to measure, originally wanted to do lowers swap on me van, but have to feel the air out (my first 36 air spring). Air won't ever have the same rebound response off the top as coil ( I like almost closed ), but it's very smooth and the RC2 LSR needle this year feels like finer/more range.

    Wipers are different this year. From the rings left, I can tell there's lube in there on the first ride..waiting to see how long it takes for stickyness to set in...
    So, as point of reference, I loaded up my '15 36 (29er, 150) w/ two orange tokens and one blue one, running 55psi (25% sag) and getting 90% travel w/ unbelievable supple small bump sensitivity. Reasoning for this is my experience w/ the Pike. I haven't counted the damper setting turns yet; can do that tonight. Ramps up beautifully to plow rocks for my 190lbs kitted up to ride. I haven't hucked it yet, which is why I'm thinking the last 10% in reserves will be ideal.
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  13. #113
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    10 reviewers of the 36 so far in this post.

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    Quote Originally Posted by randan View Post
    @amxc: are there any pics from your Blur TRC with the 36? Thanks in advance
    2015 Fox 36-blur_36.jpg

    Enjoy the amazingly bad lighting.

    It's a hair under 24lbs with pedals and the Trail Kings until it gets a spare tube, pump, and bottle mounted.

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by amxc View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	blur_36.jpg 
Views:	446 
Size:	226.2 KB 
ID:	916062

    Enjoy the amazingly bad lighting.

    It's a hair under 24lbs with pedals and the Trail Kings until it gets a spare tube, pump, and bottle mounted.
    It's big brother...

    2015 Fox 36-915393d1407904034-tallboy-lt-ltc-owners-thread-915331d1407904034-tallboy-lt-first-time-downhille.jpg

    2015 Fox 36-915394d1407903869-tallboy-lt-ltc-owners-thread-915330d1407903869-tallboy-lt-first-time-downhille.jpg
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    Looks like a rock-flattening machine!

    I ride mostly in Santa Cruz, so the little wheels work really well.

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by amxc View Post
    Looks like a rock-flattening machine!

    I ride mostly in Santa Cruz, so the little wheels work really well.
    Hehehe... CO Front Range is a bit chunky
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  18. #118
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    Had mine a couple of weeks now. Replaces 2013 RC36 rc2. The difference is like chalk and cheese.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2015 Fox 36-dsc_1904.jpg  

    AJR

  19. #119
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    Are those 26" wheels

  20. #120
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    no 27.5
    AJR

  21. #121
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    It is good to see positive comments about the new Fox 36. To be honest after my experience with a 2013 Fox fork I am not that willing to return back but it is good to have options. Even of they are quite overpriced compared to RS for example.

  22. #122
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    New 36 on a Bronson

    2015 Fox 36-img_1151.jpg

    Much better than the Talas!

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by harradm View Post
    Much better than the Talas!
    2015 Talas or older unit?

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    Quote Originally Posted by riding4fun View Post
    2015 Talas or older unit?
    2014 Talas that the bike came with new.

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    Do you miss the Talas feature?

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    Quote Originally Posted by riding4fun View Post
    Do you miss the Talas feature?
    Not at all. Only used it once and that was just to test it out. If you climb crazy steep stuff it might be handy but the fork was so bad I would never, ever own a Talas fork again.

  27. #127
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    Not sure how to compare forks directly but that has not been my experience at all with my 2015 TALAS FOX 36 160/130 29er.
    I use it every ride and, short or long, it out performs the PIKE single air I started with.
    It works so good I will never ride without one and would not hesitate to recommend one to my friends.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2015 Fox 36-foxy-carbine1.jpg  

    Big Wheels and Fat Skis keep me young.

  28. #128
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    Had a chance to look at the shim staking in the new 36. Surprisingly simple!
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  29. #129
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    Getting my first ride on mine today, looking forward to it. But it's on a completely new bike build, so might take a few rides to really get familiar with it.

    I set mine up per the starting guidelines in the Fox set guide I found online, with 20% sag.

    I will say though, pulling out those 15mm axle inserts was a total PITA. One of mine was stuck, and I complete gouged the hell out of it getting it out. And the 19.5 in/lbs of torque on the axle and pinch bolts really doesn't seem like much at all, but I guess that's compared to Marz's super high torques on their pinch bolt forks, which is what I am used to.
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  30. #130
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    Make sure to check that the dropouts are tight after rides until things settle in, especially the drive side w/ 20mm
    ...

  31. #131
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    Rode a buddy's new Nomad 27.5 with a Pike on it last weekend. MY '15 36 blows it away in my opinion. Way smoother and more controlled. Pike felt like it had a lot of stiction in comparison, even though it gets praised for its plushness.

    In any case, I would recommend a 2015 36 to anyone, every time, no matter what. It's worth the extra cost, IMO. Plus you get WAY more adjustment.

    EVIL Following

    Surly Wednesday

  32. #132
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    Got a good ride on mine today, man this fork feels stiff. Seems much stiffer than the Pike on my other bike. But I went through some really rough stuff and landed a few things, er, not so well, and I still couldn't get the last 1 1/4" of travel. Looks like I will need to pull the air spring out and take out the factory installed blue token/spacer.

    FWIW, its mounted on a Knolly Warden, 66' head angle. I'm about 210 or so geared up, and 75psi gets me right at 20% sag.
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  33. #133
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    rscecil007 - can you give any further comparisons to the Pike? small bump/brake dive..better or same?

  34. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by riding4fun View Post
    rscecil007 - can you give any further comparisons to the Pike? small bump/brake dive..better or same?
    Only one real ride so far, so kinda early to really say. But it seems to be just as plush and wants to stay up in the travel. I didn't notice it diving any, I'll put it that way.
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  35. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    Only one real ride so far, so kinda early to really say. But it seems to be just as plush and wants to stay up in the travel. I didn't notice it diving any, I'll put it that way.
    isn't the real Q how it feels compared to the almighty Avalanche cartridge? you are coming from a Marz 55 w/ one aren't you?
    breezy shade

  36. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    Got a good ride on mine today, man this fork feels stiff. Seems much stiffer than the Pike on my other bike. But I went through some really rough stuff and landed a few things, er, not so well, and I still couldn't get the last 1 1/4" of travel. Looks like I will need to pull the air spring out and take out the factory installed blue token/spacer.

    FWIW, its mounted on a Knolly Warden, 66' head angle. I'm about 210 or so geared up, and 75psi gets me right at 20% sag.
    Let all of the air out of the fork and then re-fill, I believe this will fix the problem. I had a similar issue. I am currently using it the parks and I have bottomed it out. I am 185lbs without gear and have 1 blue spacer (which comes with it), and running about 78psi.

  37. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by nhodge View Post
    isn't the real Q how it feels compared to the almighty Avalanche cartridge? you are coming from a Marz 55 w/ one aren't you?
    Well let's be honest, that's not really a fair comparison. That's like comparing a new Mustang 5.0 GT to a Shelby's Super Snake version. I seriously doubt anything would ever come close to an Any tuned fork.
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  38. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dude! View Post
    Let all of the air out of the fork and then re-fill, I believe this will fix the problem. I had a similar issue. I am currently using it the parks and I have bottomed it out. I am 185lbs without gear and have 1 blue spacer (which comes with it), and running about 78psi.
    Wierd, ok I'll give it a try. Any idea what's going on inside there to cause this? I'm guessing if I do this I will also need a few psi more to get the sag correct?

    So do I just let the air out and immediately pump it back up? Or do I need to compress the fork completely when I let the air out, then re-fill, etc? I know on the Fox site I watched a video about changing the travel (I think), and they said when you get it re-filled, you need to slowly compress the lowers a little bit a time, for a few times, to get the negative spring to equal out or something.
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  39. #139
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    Re: 2015 Fox 36

    Quote Originally Posted by Dude! View Post
    Let all of the air out of the fork and then re-fill, I believe this will fix the problem. I had a similar issue. I am currently using it the parks and I have bottomed it out. I am 185lbs without gear and have 1 blue spacer (which comes with it), and running about 78psi.
    Hey Dude, what kind of sag are you running?
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  40. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    Hey Dude, what kind of sag are you running?
    Around 20%, but this is always for me to measure by myself. I start with the recommended psi and then adjust accordingly. I tend to run my fork on the stiffer side with air pressure and less dampening.

    I have been riding this in the parks for the last few days and my hands feel great. I am surprised at how well this fork is handling all of this stuff. I am riding the entire day. It is great on the jumps as well as the technical.

    BTW - Ryan told me that letting the air out and refilling did the trick. It is weird magic that is happening in that fork when this happens.

  41. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dude! View Post

    BTW - Ryan told me that letting the air out and refilling did the trick. It is weird magic that is happening in that fork when this happens.
    Yup, appears to have done it. I told Jamie earlier after I tried it, that by riding and slamming the front down I can get all but the last 1/2" now, and that's with the bottom out almost full open. So I'd guess on the trail that should be about right.
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  42. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dude! View Post
    Around 20%, but this is always for me to measure by myself. I start with the recommended psi and then adjust accordingly. I tend to run my fork on the stiffer side with air pressure and less dampening.

    I have been riding this in the parks for the last few days and my hands feel great. I am surprised at how well this fork is handling all of this stuff. I am riding the entire day. It is great on the jumps as well as the technical.

    BTW - Ryan told me that letting the air out and refilling did the trick. It is weird magic that is happening in that fork when this happens.
    Cool thanks.
    I run my 29/150 version kind of the other way...soft w/ a good bit of damping, at least the HSC side. LSC is open enough to track small bumps on climbs. I also have 2 orange and 1 blue spacer in, set to about 27% at 52psi. Rebound is pretty open tho.
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  43. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    Had a chance to look at the shim staking in the new 36. Surprisingly simple!
    Did you check out the rest,, was the damper assembly model specific to match the 650b vs 29 air spring?
    ...

  44. #144
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    Got a fair bit of riding in on my 36 now and I'm just not where I want to be with the settings still. Its a great fork an tracks amazing but at this moment in time the feel is a mile off.

    I have a 170mm 650b 36 and over rough terrain like rock gardens and rock covered I'm just not getting on with it. Im getting bad arm pump through hanging on!

    I have tried changing most things and the last one to try is adding another volume spacer. At the moment I have one blue spacer in it and was thinking of adding either another blue one or maybe a orange to start with.

    Where are other people at on the 36 setup on a 170mm 650b fork?

    I am 190lbs ready to ride and its on a new Nomad.

  45. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deerhill View Post
    Did you check out the rest,, was the damper assembly model specific to match the 650b vs 29 air spring?
    Just got confirmation that they're not different across the entire '15 36 Floats, unless it was done thru an OE spec.
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  46. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Draper View Post
    Got a fair bit of riding in on my 36 now and I'm just not where I want to be with the settings still. Its a great fork an tracks amazing but at this moment in time the feel is a mile off.

    I have a 170mm 650b 36 and over rough terrain like rock gardens and rock covered I'm just not getting on with it. Im getting bad arm pump through hanging on!

    I have tried changing most things and the last one to try is adding another volume spacer. At the moment I have one blue spacer in it and was thinking of adding either another blue one or maybe a orange to start with.

    Where are other people at on the 36 setup on a 170mm 650b fork?

    I am 190lbs ready to ride and its on a new Nomad.
    You and I are about the same weight ready to ride, and I went to the same setup I used on my Pike right away. I had 3 tokens in my Pike, and to mimic it in the 36, I stuck in 2 orange spacers and 1 blue. I'm running 50 to 53 psi on a 29er/150mm fork w/ ~27% sag, for a TB LTc frame. I need to do the (-) spring reset like Dude! was saying as I'm not getting the last 3/4" travel. But other than that, the fork feels pretty damn good.
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  47. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    You and I are about the same weight ready to ride, and I went to the same setup I used on my Pike right away. I had 3 tokens in my Pike, and to mimic it in the 36, I stuck in 2 orange spacers and 1 blue. I'm running 50 to 53 psi on a 29er/150mm fork w/ ~27% sag, for a TB LTc frame. I need to do the (-) spring reset like Dude! was saying as I'm not getting the last 3/4" travel. But other than that, the fork feels pretty damn good.
    Thanks.

    I have been doing a bit of research and I have come across this:
    2015 Fox 36 RC2: Ridden in Moab and BC - NSMB.com

    This part specifically reads exactly how I feel about mine at the moment:
    "My first few outings with the new 36 weren’t spectacular. It was robust and progressive, but so much so that I wasn’t able to bottom it out, even in spots where a front fork should always retract like a poked slug. Sure, it rode high in its travel and in that sense matched what was happening in the back of the Nomad, but the fact that I wasn’t able to use all of its travel, and what I did use wasn’t feeling groovy meant we clearly hadn’t unlocked the fork’s setup secrets just yet. Traction wasn’t great, either – so we didn’t have it dialed for middle and deep stroke hits or for suppleness at the beginning through middle of the stroke."

    I have emailed them to see if they can tell me what volume spacers they ran but here are the settings they got to:
    Rider weight: 185 lbs.
    RC2 spring preload: 63 lbs.
    Low speed compression: 9 from closed (of a total of 26 clicks)
    High speed compression: 7 from closed (of a total of 23 clicks)

    They are running quite a lot lower PSI than I am.

  48. #148
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    I weigh about 175/180 undressed, and am running a 2015 160mm 27.5 solo position 36 rc2 on a 2014 Giant Trance Sx. Currently between 69-70psi for trail riding, with 8 from open rebound, 6 from open hi speed comp, and 7 from open lo speed comp. No tokens. Feels accurate but plush. Love it. Sounds like RickDraper might need to add pressure, take out tokens, and speed up.
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  49. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Draper View Post
    Thanks.

    I have been doing a bit of research and I have come across this:
    2015 Fox 36 RC2: Ridden in Moab and BC - NSMB.com

    This part specifically reads exactly how I feel about mine at the moment:
    "My first few outings with the new 36 weren’t spectacular. It was robust and progressive, but so much so that I wasn’t able to bottom it out, even in spots where a front fork should always retract like a poked slug. Sure, it rode high in its travel and in that sense matched what was happening in the back of the Nomad, but the fact that I wasn’t able to use all of its travel, and what I did use wasn’t feeling groovy meant we clearly hadn’t unlocked the fork’s setup secrets just yet. Traction wasn’t great, either – so we didn’t have it dialed for middle and deep stroke hits or for suppleness at the beginning through middle of the stroke."

    I have emailed them to see if they can tell me what volume spacers they ran but here are the settings they got to:
    Rider weight: 185 lbs.
    RC2 spring preload: 63 lbs.
    Low speed compression: 9 from closed (of a total of 26 clicks)
    High speed compression: 7 from closed (of a total of 23 clicks)

    They are running quite a lot lower PSI than I am.
    Do post what the reply is on the number of tokens, TIA.
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  50. #150
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    2015 Fox 36

    My approach to tokens in the pike and 36 is only use if I need to. By this I mean that I use the most psi I can but still use the travel and keep small bump compliance. This way the fork stays more stable and is more accurate. Thankfully the best thing about the pike and 36 is their small bump compliance, so you can run more pressure and still have it be sensitive and have good traction.


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  51. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    Just got confirmation that they're not different across the entire '15 36 Floats, unless it was done thru an OE spec.
    Hmm..so lowers swap? 29 to 650b (w/ simple bump stop) would be the icing on the cake.
    ...

  52. #152
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    Re: 2015 Fox 36

    Quote Originally Posted by Deerhill View Post
    Hmm..so lowers swap? 29 to 650b (w/ simple bump stop) would be the icing on the cake.
    I only asked about the tune, nothing else...like if the CSU/stanchions we the same. You might want to double check w/ Fox on the other stuff.
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  53. #153
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    2015 Fox 36

    Here are my settings on 26" 36 RC2 160

    Geared up weight - 195-200lb

    Factory settings for volume spacers (1 blue I think it is? In any case haven't touched)

    *all my settings below are from FULL OPEN (aka clicks "in")

    For mellow trail riding:
    Pressure: 75 psi
    LSC: 8-10 clicks
    HSC: 2 clicks
    Rebound: 4 clicks

    For gravity trails:
    Pressure: 78 psi
    LSC: 14-16 clicks
    HSC: 7-8 clicks
    Rebound: 4-5 clicks

    Fork is buttery smooth and controlled. Very little dive. Excellent mid stroke. Still good pop off features.

    I use full travel only on the BIGGEST of hits. This, IMHO, is how it should be. If I was using full travel just regularly trail riding I'd be wondering why I'm blowing through travel so easily.

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  54. #154
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    I have removed the volume spacer so I will start with non fitted and I started out setting the fork up sag wise with the damper wide open. I have set it to 20% sag and before I did so I ensured both air chambers were totally empty of air at full travel. At this stage I discovered my fox digital pump (POS) is 50psi out so I went back to my ever reliable rockshox pump.

    I have set the damper up exactly as the NSMB settings I posted on the last page. I will report back how I get on with it after tomorrows ride.

    I also made this crib sheet of all the settings I could find from people up to now on the new 36. Done for damper settings primarily but I will update it when I get chance to state wheel size and travel. All the settings are clicks out from fully closed.

    Fox 36.

    Fox recommended base settings:

    Air spring:

    15-20% Sag
    170-185lbs 72psi
    185-200lbs 78psi
    One blue volume spacer

    Damper settings:

    HSC: 18 clicks
    LSC: 13 clicks
    Rebound: 13 clicks

    NSMB 185lbs rider:

    Pressure: 63 psi
    HSC: 7 clicks
    LSC: 9 clicks
    Rebound: Torwards the fast side

    Vital 175lbs rider:

    Pressure: 67 psi,
    HSC: 10 clicks
    LSC: 9 clicks
    Rebound: 12 clicks

    LCW 195-200lbs rider:

    One blue volume spacer

    For mellow trail riding:
    Pressure: 75 psi
    HSC: 20 clicks
    LSC: 15-17 clicks
    Rebound: 13 clicks

    For gravity trails:
    Pressure: 78 psi
    HSC: 14-15 clicks
    LSC: 9-11 clicks
    Rebound: 12-13 clicks

    argibson 175/180lbs rider:

    No volume spacer
    Pressure: 69-70psi for trail riding
    HSC: 14 clicks
    LSC: 18 clicks
    Rebound: 9 clicks

    172lbs rider:

    One blue volume spacer
    Pressure: 78psi,
    HSC: 12 clicks
    LSC: 12 clicks
    Rebound: 14 clicks

  55. #155
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    Nice crib sheet!

  56. #156
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    Has anyone noticed what seems a small bit of bushing play between the uppers and lowers?

    I noticed today while riding what I though was something a bit loose. Headset is snug, no issues there. I DON'T THINK it's my brakes (Shimano XTR, pads have been known to move around and give the false sense of a loose headset). From what I can tell, it sounds like the seal/bushing area where the play is happening...
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  57. #157
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    Update - I weigh between 185-190lbs. I was riding with 79psi (have to look at my other settings) with 1 blue spacer. This has worked well. I occasionally bottom out harshly with this set-up though. I recently switched to the bigger orange spacer at 78 psi. I will see how this performs next. I hope it avoids these harsher bottom outs.

  58. #158
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    Do you bottom out after big jumps or drops or during regular AM rides?

  59. #159
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    I'm at like 25 percent sag. (60 psi. For my 165 lb body weight) I'm not using full travel, there's like an inch and a half that I'm not using. Slowly opening my HSc which I think is helping. I'm at 5 clicks from fully open. Should I just go a few more clicks? Other than not using full travel the shock feels really good.

  60. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paris Galanis View Post
    Do you bottom out after big jumps or drops or during regular AM rides?
    It is more flattish landing jumps/drops that are on the bigger side. I am hoping the difference between the blue and orange spacer is enough volume to reduce these rare occurrences. When it happens, it is not horrible, but you don't want to repeat it.

  61. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    Has anyone noticed what seems a small bit of bushing play between the uppers and lowers?

    I noticed today while riding what I though was something a bit loose. Headset is snug, no issues there. I DON'T THINK it's my brakes (Shimano XTR, pads have been known to move around and give the false sense of a loose headset). From what I can tell, it sounds like the seal/bushing area where the play is happening...
    No play. Check if the dropout bolts are tight. The first compression is getting tougher and tougher to break free though, like strange suction. After that it's butter. I have a feeling it needs a good lube'n
    ...

  62. #162
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    So my bushings are slightly loose, had my pal sanity check for me. Called Fox, they said it's find to ride (just annoying) and to send it back when I have a bit of downtime. So NBD really, not keeping me off the bike.

    I did take the stock blue bottom out spacer out, and had to bump up my PSI to about 82 (from 72 or so) to get 20% sag. Thing is I had two really solid hard rides since I did that, and still didn't close to bottoming it out on the trail, and that's with the HSC wide open. Seems odd, unless running that high of psi to get the right sag is just keeping me from bottoming?

    Personally I'd rather be able to bottom it and dial in some HSC, but maybe I'm still just figuring out the fork.
    Last edited by rscecil007; 09-07-2014 at 09:25 AM.
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  63. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by jredling View Post
    I'm at like 25 percent sag. (60 psi. For my 165 lb body weight) I'm not using full travel, there's like an inch and a half that I'm not using. Slowly opening my HSc which I think is helping. I'm at 5 clicks from fully open. Should I just go a few more clicks? Other than not using full travel the shock feels really good.
    why use any HSC? think of HSC as a bottom out preventing feature. if you're still showing 1 1/2" of unused travel, dial it out completely
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  64. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by nhodge View Post
    why use any HSC? think of HSC as a bottom out preventing feature. if you're still showing 1 1/2" of unused travel, dial it out completely
    Because HSC events can happen in the beginning of stroke...think landing a drop.
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  65. #165
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    Something just occurred to me, and maybe I'm remembering wrong, but I think Craig at Avalanche once told me you want a bit of HSC and LSC dialed in no matter what, that running either wide open affected the performance in some negative way.

    Now I might be remembering that wrong, so don't take that as gospel. And I can't remember the specifics surrounding it, in terms of what it did and why you didn't want to do that.
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  66. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    So my bushings are slightly loose, had my pal sanity check for me. Called Fox, they said it's find to ride (just annoying) and to send it back when I have a bit of downtime. So NBD really, not keeping me off the bike.

    I did take the stock blue bottom out spacer out, and had to bump up my PSI to about 82 (from 72 or so) to get 20% sag. Thing is I had two really solid hard rides since I did that, and still didn't close to bottoming it out on the trail, and that's with the HSC wide open. Seems odd, unless running that high of psi to get the right sag is just keeping me from bottoming?

    Personally I'd rather be able to bottom it and dial in some HSC, but maybe I'm still just figuring out the fork.
    I am sure what's going on with your fork, considering that I am now running 78psi with an orange. The orange spacer is providing more end stroke bottom support.

    I know I have more time on the fork than you in the sense break in period and doing laps in the bike park helps this a bunch.

    All and all, I really like the fork. I am not sure if I ever get all of its travel. I have about 165mm of stanchion showing and when I would bottom-out harshly (based on feel), I think I used about 155mm of travel. This is a guestimate.

    I will confirm my LSC, HSC, and rebound settings and post these later.

    There was a good description that I think NSMB provided. This is their analogy. When a door is closed and the room is dark, opening the door a tad (1 click) increased the light by 50%, and each subsequent click has a smaller affect. So the clicks that are near wide open has less affect than the clicks when closed.

  67. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    Because HSC events can happen in the beginning of stroke...think landing a drop.
    doesn't matter when it happens. if it happens, it happens. if a drop bottoms out the fork, dial in some compression. if not, don't.

    when i was on my '06 Marz Z1 Light i had to use 2 extra clicks of comp. to offset a complete bottom out on about a 3 foot drop @ a trail system where bottom out happened nowhere else. so, i only dialed it in when i was on that one section. otherwise, i was pretty much using it all w/ no harsh bottoming.

    Marz didn't then & i still don't think now have separate high & low adjusters, so i always ran a few clicks in from wide open.
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  68. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by nhodge View Post
    why use any HSC? think of HSC as a bottom out preventing feature. if you're still showing 1 1/2" of unused travel, dial it out completely
    Exactly.
    I don't use any on my 2013 F160. IMho try and use as little as possible and rely on progression as much as possible otherwise you could introduce spiking.

  69. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    So my bushings are slightly loose, had my pal sanity check for me. Called Fox, they said it's find to ride (just annoying) and to send it back when I have a bit of downtime. So NBD really, not keeping me off the bike.

    I did take the stock blue bottom out spacer out, and had to bump up my PSI to about 82 (from 72 or so) to get 20% sag. Thing is I had two really solid hard rides since I did that, and still didn't close to bottoming it out on the trail, and that's with the HSC wide open. Seems odd, unless running that high of psi to get the right sag is just keeping me from bottoming?

    Personally I'd rather be able to bottom it and dial in some HSC, but maybe I'm still just figuring out the fork.
    IMHO bst to try one thing at atime and strt with the air spring.IMHO best way to tune the air spring is to back all comp off and bottom it on a G out leaning as far fwd as you dare.That way you remove most of HSC influence. In most cases that is as much travel as you will ever use on the trail. Try adding / removing spacers and or air to get a few combinations [ linear and progressive] that will give you near full travel. Now feed in reqd lsc and go ride.If bottoming on the trail either add hsc, but noting any spikes it may introduce, or use a moreprogressive spacer/air pressure set up you found doing the g out runs.

  70. #170
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    2015 Fox 36

    Here's a setup question - for say coming down steep rock faces that has holes or ridges that can stuff a front wheel and send you OTB, would you increase LSC or HSC? Depending on how slowly one comes down such a feature, could be high or low speed... Thoughts?

    PS - already running stiff-ish air spring setup - about 15% sag

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    Re: 2015 Fox 36

    Quote Originally Posted by LCW View Post
    Here's a setup question - for say coming down steep rock faces that has holes or ridges that can stuff a front wheel and send you OTB, would you increase LSC or HSC? Depending on how slowly one comes down such a feature, could be high or low speed... Thoughts?
    Increase LSC damping so the fork platforms, decrease rebound so the fork can sit high in its stroke.
    If you're in the steeps with wheel swallowing holes, good chance you're not moving at Mach-looney, and shaft speed is directly related what speed you hit things at.
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  72. #172
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    2015 Fox 36

    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    Increase LSC damping so the fork platforms, decrease rebound so the fork can sit high in its stroke.
    If you're in the steeps with wheel swallowing holes, good chance you're not moving at Mach-looney, and shaft speed is directly related what speed you hit things at.
    I'm just wondering depending how quickly one stuffs a wheels into a hole even if moving relatively slowly, where the threshold lies in terms of shaft (stanchion in this case) speed between low and high.

    Ideally would be nice to mount a string pot or linear pot and measure it directly

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  73. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by LCW View Post
    I'm just wondering depending how quickly one stuffs a wheels into a hole even if moving relatively slowly, where the threshold lies in terms of shaft (stanchion in this case) speed between low and high.

    Ideally would be nice to mount a string pot or linear pot and measure it directly
    So, my understanding is LSC is on the needle, and HSC is typically on the shim stack. No damper controls the entire flow across the piston...a good portion of the oil flow is passed via a bypass port. Except the Avy bypass port is tiiiiny, so most of the oil actually goes across the shims. And dampers w/ HSC adjustments are typically rim loading the compression shim stack...this is what my DVO is doing, and IIRC, what the Charger damper in the Pike is doing...had a convo w/ Craig at Avy on this over a year ago.

    With this in mind, I don't think when your negotiating steep tech at low speeds you'll open up the HSC damping much at all...maybe if you choke down the LSC to almost lockout and you push hard when the front end drops into a bomb crater, and it has a square edge hit in it, would it cause the HSC to open and blow off the hit...? But even w/ all those combos in the most ideal situation, I still don't thing you'll get into the HSC part in the particular situation you cited.

    Oh, btw, there is a damper shaft in the stanchion. I think if you think of the stanchion as the damper body, it would be more accurate. But yeah, the stanchion and shaft would move at the same speed.
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  74. #174
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    2015 Fox 36

    Good stuff Pau11y - appreciate the feedback

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    Quote Originally Posted by LCW View Post
    Here's a setup question - for say coming down steep rock faces that has holes or ridges that can stuff a front wheel and send you OTB, would you increase LSC or HSC? Depending on how slowly one comes down such a feature, could be high or low speed... Thoughts?

    PS - already running stiff-ish air spring setup - about 15% sag
    It's very rare that HSC needs to be changed on an adjuster, in fact it's usually set fairly conservatively by the manufacturers like Fox, so some chunky rider won't blow the fork up in choppy terrain. If HSC needed to be increased, you'd know because the fork would have slammed to the end of travel on a sharp square edged bump. It would be pretty obvious. Damping increases as the square of velocity, which is why high speed damping is digressive.

    Now, chassis stability is usually low-speed control, meaning if it's diving and kind of going "all over the place" it's most likely that it needs more low speed.

    Particularly on this page, there seems to be some general misinformation about what is a "high speed" event. It's how fast the damper must move. Most drops and jumps are low speed events, most adjustable compression dampers allow you to adjust low speed compression. You only fall at 9.8m/s^2, and you probably aren't falling 9.8m, but riding at 20mph and hit a 5" vertical face and your fork would be forced to move nearly 5" almost instantaneously, much faster than 9.8m/s.

    One thing to think about though, HSC and LSC adjustments do affect each other, even with a fork that truly offers those adjustments (most do not, fox "HSC" adjustment is just preloading the shims, even if you don't have enough HSC, by increasing this you'll make the rest of the travel harsher, instead of just affecting HSC)-if you increase the HSC you will force a little more oil through the LSC circuit, and vice versa, which is why sometimes running no "damping" on the adjusters can lead to some poor traits, but that can be very fork-specific, so you can't necessarily apply it across the line to all manufacturers.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LCW View Post
    I'm just wondering depending how quickly one stuffs a wheels into a hole even if moving relatively slowly, where the threshold lies in terms of shaft (stanchion in this case) speed between low and high.

    Ideally would be nice to mount a string pot or linear pot and measure it directly
    The various manufacturers have dynos that figure this out, they also use test rigs that are actually ridden and give telemetry data. Right now a new (to mountain bikes) thing is to put a mid-valve on the bikes, to help the fork isolate braking and g-out events better while still absorbing bumps in the turn or while braking. Theoretically, you could keep making a new valve for each speed range, it just depends on how many speed-ranges you want to have valves for.

    I've always heard a lot of people talking about somewhat lackluster forks and shocks and how they "take big hits great", in terms of a jump or drop. The thing is that this kind of damping is usually pretty dead simple and can be provided with a simple oil port. The real trick is usually the high speed circuit and making it interact with the low speed circuit in a way that gives you good low speed stability, while blowing off and absorbing the sharper hits, making it feel better the faster you go. My Avy stuff felt like this and my Pike actually does to a decent extent.

    I can feel the difference between the low and high speed stuff just based on how fast the fork/shock reacts. I know the rate of compression for a sharper edged bump would be way too slow if it was the low-speed, but in any case, it's dependent on shaft velocity, not forward speed.
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    Re: 2015 Fox 36

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ...it's dependent on shaft velocity, not forward speed.
    But shaft speed is derived from fwd speed and what you hit, which also means a drop event or a jump landings becomes a high speed event depending on how big you go and what you're landing in. A big high speed air that puts you 15 ft in the air and and 50 ft down the trail, and you over shoot the tranny and land in the flat... I'm thinking the first 50% of you fork's total movement for that impulse is going to be pretty damn fast. Same when you come off a 10 or 12 ft low takeoff speed/near vertical drop to a good tranny. That initial impulse is gonna be pretty fast, then exponetially die off as damping and spring reacts. This is why i said somewhere else (the Pike thread? ) that taking out HSC and only relying on air spring progression is a bad idea, even if you're getting only 90% of travel all the time... no resistance in the beginning, then slam into a wall as the air spring ramps up sharply, followed by snapping your wrist, and then possibly oral surgery to follow.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    So my bushings are slightly loose, had my pal sanity check for me. Called Fox, they said it's find to ride (just annoying) and to send it back when I have a bit of downtime. So NBD really, not keeping me off the bike.
    How loose is slightly loose? Mine are real clunky like a well loose headset, only 4 rides in. I'm taking my new bike back in to the shop tomorrow

  79. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgrAde View Post
    How loose is slightly loose? Mine are real clunky like a well loose headset, only 4 rides in. I'm taking my new bike back in to the shop tomorrow
    With the bike on the ground, it feels like I have a loose headset. And I notice it on the trail constantly.

    With the bike hanging from the stand, I can grab the lowers and rock them, and feel it. I really need to send it back, but I don't want to be without it very long. We don't have many weeks of good weather left up here before the rain starts.
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  80. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    But shaft speed is derived from fwd speed and what you hit, which also means a drop event or a jump landings becomes a high speed event depending on how big you go and what you're landing in. A big high speed air that puts you 15 ft in the air and and 50 ft down the trail, and you over shoot the tranny and land in the flat... I'm thinking the first 50% of you fork's total movement for that impulse is going to be pretty damn fast. Same when you come off a 10 or 12 ft low takeoff speed/near vertical drop to a good tranny. That initial impulse is gonna be pretty fast, then exponetially die off as damping and spring reacts. This is why i said somewhere else (the Pike thread? ) that taking out HSC and only relying on air spring progression is a bad idea, even if you're getting only 90% of travel all the time... no resistance in the beginning, then slam into a wall as the air spring ramps up sharply, followed by snapping your wrist, and then possibly oral surgery to follow.
    Not really, you need to separate the X and the Y there. Doing a drop AND hitting a sharp rock upon landing would be a high AND low speed event, but your forward speed as far as the drop is concerned is not important. Yes, you can "drop" pretty fast, no, it's not as fast as the fork has to move when you are riding 20mph and hit a 5" vertical rock face. Now, you do have to be moving at a decent clip for high-speed impacts, at 1mph you probably can't get over the threshold no matter what you do because the shaft/damper won't move fast enough, but effectively the speed is left out of this because it's usually fast enough that the impact could be either, and it's entirely possible to have slow speed "impacts" while going way fast, like g-outs, braking forces, weight transfers, small smooth trail irregularities/imperfections.

    Shaft speed is not derived from forward speed for low-speed impacts like drops, only for high-speed impacts like sharp square edged bumps, because the bump creates a situation the shaft must overcome (move x amount of distance in a certain time). For the low speed impact (drop) there's no distance the shaft has to travel in a certain amount of time, if the fork wants to it can take 1 second or .1 seconds to compress at the landing. This then becomes about most effectively damping the impact, but think about it like this way, if you jump at 10mph 5 feet into the air and land and then do the exact same event at 25mph, would the impact force not be the same? It would, the fork is only "damping" that vertical movement. It doesn't care or know one is traveling 15mph faster in the forward direction.
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  81. #181
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    2015 Fox 36

    Is open on LSC and HSC + or -?

    Shouldn't I start with LSC and HSC both fully closed and tune from there or is my thinking incorrect?

  82. #182
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    Hey Punky,

    I went with Suspension Werx recommendations.

    I start with fully closed, or turned all the way in (-). I'm running both HSC and LSC at 6 clicks out (+) from all the way in (-) with one blue spacer which I will soon change to one orange.
    I'm running 35 mm sag which is 20% ...I'm on a 170mm...so perhaps try 30mm sag to get you about 18/19% sag on a 160mm Fork .
    Fox Recommends running the 36 RC2's at 15-20 % sag.

    F'n Loving my RC2

  83. #183
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    2015 Fox 36

    ^Good info Bradical
    I've got the 36RC2 29 150 coming that I'll be lowering to 140 or 130 for my hardtail.

  84. #184
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    @ rscecil007 Yes bush play.. Been fighting the loose axle bolts which cause a similar feel. After jacking around with the air spring spacers to stop bottoming out, I double checked the bushings and they are knocking. It's actually pretty loud now.....*more than my 4 year old 36 van lowers*
    ...

  85. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deerhill View Post
    @ rscecil007 Yes bush play.. Been fighting the loose axle bolts which cause a similar feel. After jacking around with the air spring spacers to stop bottoming out, I double checked the bushings and they are knocking. It's actually pretty loud now.....louder than my 2011 van
    Well that sucks, sorry man.
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  86. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    It's very rare that HSC needs to be changed on an adjuster, in fact it's usually set fairly conservatively by the manufacturers like Fox, so some chunky rider won't blow the fork up in choppy terrain..
    That may still be the case for Rock shox [Rev 150 air vol still 30% more than F32 150 and HSC still pretty high to counter that] but in 2013 Fox dumped the HSC on the fit cartridges . IMHO[ counter to popular forum feedback], that's why, with a tweak down of the air volume the 2013 F32 are very good on sharp edge hits with natural terrain.

    The 2015 appears to have followed that going by the handfuls of HSC that everybody is feeding in?

  87. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    .

    I've always heard a lot of people talking about somewhat lackluster forks and shocks and how they "take big hits great", in terms of a jump or drop. The thing is that this kind of damping is usually pretty dead simple and can be provided with a simple oil port. The real trick is usually the high speed circuit and making it interact with the low speed circuit in a way that gives you good low speed stability, while blowing off and absorbing the sharper hits, making it feel better the faster you go.
    That's why i could never understand why everybody used to rave about RS Revs ti's. Maybe they all rode groomed, bermed jump tracks. Certainly great for those but the primitive comp design gave too much bar feed back on high speed natural terrain.
    Mind you the early F32 fit dampers had way OTT HSC so were just as bad or worse.
    That year they started tweeaking up the air volume and I think panicked on the HSC overcompensation?

  88. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by jredling View Post
    I'm at like 25 percent sag. (60 psi. For my 165 lb body weight) I'm not using full travel, there's like an inch and a half that I'm not using. Slowly opening my HSc which I think is helping. I'm at 5 clicks from fully open. Should I just go a few more clicks? Other than not using full travel the shock feels really good.
    Have you tried removing the blue spacer (stock there should be 1 in there). Since you're so light, removing it (if you haven't already) might allow you to get full travel, without needing to run really low pressure (and too much sag).

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  89. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dude! View Post
    Update - I weigh between 185-190lbs. I was riding with 79psi (have to look at my other settings) with 1 blue spacer. This has worked well. I occasionally bottom out harshly with this set-up though. I recently switched to the bigger orange spacer at 78 psi. I will see how this performs next. I hope it avoids these harsher bottom outs.
    So what was the outcome from switching out the blue spacer and putting in the orange spacer? Could you run a bit less pressure and still get more progression at the end to prevent bottoming?

    Just wondering if putting in a larger spacer (or more small ones) but trying to maintain same bottoming performance, would allow to drop pressure for a bit better small bump compliance.

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  90. #190
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    FYI, not sure if any of you have read this: Air in Pike lowers: a PSA

    But Chad from Red Barn posted on page 2 that he tried it with his 2015 36 and worked wonders. I wonder if that might have had anything to do with me not getting full travel...hmm.

    Sent my fork back to Fox, they should have it by this afternoon, so we will see.
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  91. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by PUNKY View Post
    ^Good info Bradical
    I've got the 36RC2 29 150 coming that I'll be lowering to 140 or 130 for my hardtail.

    How much can those be lowered?



    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    Sent my fork back to Fox, they should have it by this afternoon, so we will see.
    Starting to wonder if the knock is from something else in the fork, rockgarden/chunk or trap the wheel and turn the bars brings it out, still need to strip it down..
    ...

  92. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    FYI, not sure if any of you have read this: Air in Pike lowers: a PSA

    But Chad from Red Barn posted on page 2 that he tried it with his 2015 36 and worked wonders. I wonder if that might have had anything to do with me not getting full travel...hmm.
    The trapped air thing will show on all forks as the air in the lower legs has nowhere to be displaced to.

  93. #193
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    2015 Fox 36

    Quote Originally Posted by Deerhill View Post
    How much can those be lowered?
    Varies based on initial fork travel, and how much you want to lower. FOX site has the full details. Somewhere...

  94. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by PUNKY View Post
    Varies based on initial fork travel, and how much you want to lower. FOX site has the full details. Somewhere...
    Here: FORK- 2015 36 FLOAT | Bike Help Center | FOX

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    Shoot, hopefully the LBS ordered the tapered 36

  96. #196
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    did you buy those ?

    The negative spacers look way different than the old ones that just pop on..
    ...

  97. #197
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    2015 Fox 36

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The various manufacturers have dynos that figure this out, they also use test rigs that are actually ridden and give telemetry data. Right now a new (to mountain bikes) thing is to put a mid-valve on the bikes, to help the fork isolate braking and g-out events better while still absorbing bumps in the turn or while braking. Theoretically, you could keep making a new valve for each speed range, it just depends on how many speed-ranges you want to have valves for.

    I've always heard a lot of people talking about somewhat lackluster forks and shocks and how they "take big hits great", in terms of a jump or drop. The thing is that this kind of damping is usually pretty dead simple and can be provided with a simple oil port. The real trick is usually the high speed circuit and making it interact with the low speed circuit in a way that gives you good low speed stability, while blowing off and absorbing the sharper hits, making it feel better the faster you go. My Avy stuff felt like this and my Pike actually does to a decent extent.

    I can feel the difference between the low and high speed stuff just based on how fast the fork/shock reacts. I know the rate of compression for a sharper edged bump would be way too slow if it was the low-speed, but in any case, it's dependent on shaft velocity, not forward speed.
    Did a little test this afternoon .... Played with the HSC settings (all else kept constant) and hitting a 6" curb square on (@ about 10-15 mph as a guesstimate). Surprisingly there wasn't a TON of difference between HSC fully and fully closed.

    Was noticeable but not a huge range. Found the best feel - not too harsh, not too underdamped) - around 6-10 clicks from full open. Didn't seem to be nearly as much range between stiff and soft as the LSC.

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  98. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by LCW View Post
    So what was the outcome from switching out the blue spacer and putting in the orange spacer? Could you run a bit less pressure and still get more progression at the end to prevent bottoming?

    Just wondering if putting in a larger spacer (or more small ones) but trying to maintain same bottoming performance, would allow to drop pressure for a bit better small bump compliance.
    I find that the orange spacer allows for better bottom out performance for my weight. It is nice to know it isn't going to bottom out, based on feel. I think I need to reduce the air pressure a tad, but I basically kept it the same as when I running the blue. I will start doing this next.

  99. #199
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    How many clicks there are (clockwise) in HSC from full out position (2015 36 Float RC2 27,5")? Turning it all the way counter-clockwise results in a clear end point whereas in the opposite direction there isn't a clear end point after about 20 clicks. Just wondering..

  100. #200
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    2015 Fox 36

    I get 22-23 clicks - the last one is like a half click. I think it varies a bit.

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