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  1. #1
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    Shimano Dual Control - opinions?

    So not too long ago I realized that the dual control levers actually let you switch with the brake handle. I kept thinking the only difference was that the shifter was integrated into the brake. Now I really want to try them but I'm not sure if I'll like them.

    Anyone ride them? Do you ever accidentally shift up/down when you brake hard? Is it a faster shift? Any other thoughts?

    thnx

  2. #2
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
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    If you go that route, you'll want a rapid rise rear derailleur for shifting consistency and a set of Gore fully enclosed cables will reduce lever effort by half for shifting.

    I spent a weekend with a bike with XTR DC shifters and brakes, and once you got used to them, they were handy in that you can shift and brake at the same time.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  3. #3
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    I have an XT dual control on my Slayer since 2005, replaced the first gen with the 2nd gen in 2008. I like it - but I like all these gadgety stuff not necessarily because of the functionality. It is functional, don't get me wrong. I like the fact I can go into rock/root and downshift at the same time to cover my mistakes (yes lack of skills). I also like uncrowded handle bar (my other ride is ss), but the units are big and quite possibly heavier than shifter plus brake.

    Bummer Shimano ditched DC with the 10 speed, not enough love I guess. If you want it they are on fire sale.

    I did go through some mis-shift before I got used to it.

  4. #4
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    Is the top normal / rapid rise derailleur required or will it just make shifting easier?

    It is gadgety and I just want to try it. I'm not racer or have mad skillz but I didn't realise how much I love the Gravity Dropper seatpost until I got one. Now I'll never go back. So maybe I'll like these. Don't care for the 10sp much right now.

  5. #5
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    you can use either type of shimano dérailleur. Shadow's will just shift in the opposite direction. Normally you flick the lever up the go up the cassette and down to go down. With a shadow it will be the opposite. I have xtr levers with an xt shadow. I use bar ends and really like the dual control becasue you can shift from on the ends. When paired with the correct derailleur it makes climbing nice from out on the bar ends, because it is a simply flick to go up the cassette into an easier gear.

  6. #6
    the catalan connection
    Reputation: What&son's Avatar
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    I had the 960 (xtr) units for some years with no problems. Although they had issues, I liked them.

    pros:
    -never failed, they were pretty crash resistant too (lever moved instead of braking)
    -as mentioned, it allows for brking and shifting at once and from different hand positions
    -they leave a clean setup on the bars

    cons:
    -if you´re very finicky about brake and shifter levers positioning you might find that with DC the best feeling lever position for shifting might compromise the braking position and the other way around.
    -always thought that the lever travel for moving to a larger chainring was excessive
    -for a real crisp shifting, cables and housings had to be in very good shape, and even then, they always had a bit of sponginess compared to separate setups. Also with the brakes. (I´m sure that was improved with the redesigned dual controls with different pivot locations)
    -960 units had an in-line reservoir. That meant they were long, and if used with narrow handlebars the two levers interfered.(problem solved on the new ones). Also, once I put them on a rise handlebar, and since I like to put the levers prety inwards the clamps were already on the handlebar bend when I had the levers where I liked them.

    If I found a nice deal on the current XTR´s, I wouldn´t mind to get them....but 10 sp are to take the market, and might turn them obsolete sooner than expected.
    "Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us wordly evidence of the fact." George Elliot

  7. #7
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    Yes the first gen DC had an in-line reservoir (XT 760) and that was actually limiting the set up angle since pointing levers down too much meant touching the riser bend. Yea I thought that was the weak point of the first gen. 2nd gen (775), I had absolutely zero problem in setting it up.

    And I also agree that moving a ring up did take quite a leverage - but I got used to it.

    I'm still puzzled with a lack of breeding port on 775 like m575 (lower than LX). I have to open up the reservoir cap to fill up, not that it's a labor...

  8. #8
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    I had XT DC levers with XT FD and XTR low normal RD for 2 years (2006-2007). I' liked them OK but where I rode it was dry, so not a problem. Where I am now (Houston) gets alot of rain and I ran into shifting sticking. Swapped all out for "regular" top normal RD and separate brake & shifters. Both setups are OK really, but I never found I could actually brake and shift at the same time easily, unless I was on the street. Bouncing through the dirt, no way. So no benefit from DC in that regard.

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