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  1. #1
    Specialized Rida
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    ?'s for Sram X.0 and XTR riders

    Which would you choose.

    I need to get some new things. Rear Derailleur, Shifter, Cassette, and chain.

    This is what I am looking for.

    Crisp, fast shifting in all conditions uphill, downhill, and everything else.
    Reliability and strenght. In case of crash.
    Don't care about price?

    I used to have Xtr components on my bike and just loved how hit performed on uphills shifting and everything else overall, but at the same time I have never tried Sram X.0 ; although, I hear it is performs pretty close to XTR. Depending on who you ask i guess.

    For the most part i was thinking of getting the new XTR, but will take into consideration the X.0 stuff if it meets what I am looking for.

    Now for those who have riden both, which would you choose and why.

  2. #2
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    XTR Vs X.0

    I ran XT and XTR exclusively until I converted to nine speed a few years back, and then could never seem to keep the bike shifting well for an entire ride. Changed over to X.9, and problem solved. Took about a week to get used to the different triggers. Truth be told, the older X.9 lever feel probably wasn't as good as Shimano, but the bike shifted perfectly, which I felt was a fair trade. Plus I wasn't convinced that Shimano wouldn't continue to paint me into a corner on the high/low normal thing.
    Then this year I built up a new bike with X.0, and oh baby. It is ridiculously expensive, but shift quality is just incredible. Can't comment on durability yet, other than it did take a pretty good hit on the rear der with no apparent damage a few weeks ago.
    I think Shimano still makes good gear, but they missed the boat by not adopting 1:1 like Sram. The new XTR gear looks really good, and I'm sure it's well made, but the lever feel isn't all that great.
    My .02 worth.

  3. #3
    Nothing here
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    I used to run XTR, but it is finicky. It is hard to keep it dialed in right for whatever reason. I went all XO and I don't miss XTR at all. XO is more positive. Wanna shift? Hit the trigger BAM you shifted.

  4. #4
    Specialized Rida
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    Yeah the XTR was pretty cool when I had, and mainly becuase it did awsome when shifting under load or uphills.

    But basically everything you guys have said is what I have been told so far. so it kind of had me re-evaluate on whether or not to get the new XTR or just go for the X.0 stuff.

    Basically what I am looking for is instant shifting under any load, and it seems like X.0 is offering just that.

  5. #5
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    I've run XT and XTR on two different bikes and after long rides in all conditions especially dusty and muddy conditions the XT and XTR needed constant adjustment, just recently went FS with X.O components (shifters, derailleur, cassette) set up the rear derailleur 6wks ago and been through all types of riding conditions and no problems yet. SRAM from now on.

  6. #6
    Master of the Face Plant
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    I wouldn't even bother paying the extra money for X.0. X.9 derailers work just as well. The X.0 shifters have a better feel though. I ran full xtr for some time and the main flaw is the bend in the cable going into the derailer. It works fine until it gets some dirt in it. With SRAM the cable is routed differently with less friction. I built my bike 3 months ago and I haven't had to adjust my shifters at all. They work flawlessly. With XTR i was constantly making adjustments.

  7. #7
    SALLGUD
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    You're missing something.

    If you can't ride XT/XTR stuff without having to make constant adjustments, then you are doing something wrong.

    The stuff works, plain and simple. I used to run XT, then said WTH and went straight XTR on my bike (Spec. SJ FSR Expert) and my wife's Yeti AS-Rsl. The XT/XTR stuff is light, sturdy, and shifts quietly and reliably.

    The ONLY concession I will on a SRAM/Shimano comparison is what sandmangts referred to. I change out the housing down by the rear derailleur as needed (usually every three to six months) and shifting is incredibly smooth and silent.

  8. #8
    Master of the Face Plant
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    Quote Originally Posted by azdrawdy
    If you can't ride XT/XTR stuff without having to make constant adjustments, then you are doing something wrong.

    The stuff works, plain and simple. I used to run XT, then said WTH and went straight XTR on my bike (Spec. SJ FSR Expert) and my wife's Yeti AS-Rsl. The XT/XTR stuff is light, sturdy, and shifts quietly and reliably.

    The ONLY concession I will on a SRAM/Shimano comparison is what sandmangts referred to. I change out the housing down by the rear derailleur as needed (usually every three to six months) and shifting is incredibly smooth and silent.
    I agree for the most part. I ran xtr on a Cannondale F2000 for 2 years and never had to even replace the cables or make any adjustments. It shifted flawlessly as long as it was clean. On my Enduro however I used the rapid rise XTR and found it more difficult to setup and once I had it dialed in it didn't stay that way for long. I used an Avid rolimagig and that helped.

    I think shimano should consider redesigning and loose the bend in the cable housing. Friction in the cable caused by dirt is the cause of many shifting problems. I find SRAM rear deraillers require far less maintenance. I set my X.9 up on my Flux about 3 months ago and I have not touched it since. I think Shimano front deraillers are better though. I also think the rampings on their chainrings are superior to others.

  9. #9
    sugoi chairinko
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    You can't lose

    I have ridden xtr since '95, and am a strong believer in how it works as a package. Mixing and matching makes it suck, but I've had absolutely no trouble with any of the xtr parts I've ran. That said, I think dual control is marginal at best, as it just feels funny, even though it runs great.

    For this year's 24 Hours of Moab, I rode my wife's Blur, equipped with Sram stuff. As has been well documented elsewhere, the race was a washout. Mud and sand everywhere, in everything. The bike didn't skip a beat. It was perfect.

    Sooo, I think you're in a win/win situation. If I had it to do over, I'd choose xo because I like the way the triggers shift, and I don't want to wait for the new xtr. But I feel some xtr stuff is still better, ie., cranks, bottom brackets.

    That's my $0.02, take it for what it's worth.

  10. #10
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    I've run XTR on various bikes since the 900 series came out in '93. Never had problems as long as I did the proper amount of maintenance.

    As far as SRAM goes, I've seen an awful lot of their rear derailleurs broken here on the North Shore. I personally don't like the shifters as they remind me of Shimano's original rapidfire shifters.
    Get over it!

  11. #11
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    Sram is nice but one rock and its garbage. It develops play and feels pretty bad.

  12. #12
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    Dual Controls..

    How does anyone live without Shimano dual controls. Brilliant equipment! I only love Sram chains.

  13. #13
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    I have never ridden with any SRAM stuff, so I dont think I can offer any valuable input. I can say that I have been running XTR for years. I am kind of old school (been MTB'ing since 1992) 2005 XTR is the newest group I was running until i recently sold my bike. I noticed that the shifting would stay true and crisp ALOT longer when you use the XTR cable kits. They have sealed ferreuls, specially lined housings, rubber wipers at each housing end, and a teflon coated cable. I ran those for a full year here with no maintenance,....then I did an off-road duathalon and it was an insane complete mudfest, my wheels would not even turn because of all the mud. cables were replaced after that.
    i am open to trying X.0 if the next bike I get has it, sounds like good stuff. I dont think I would mix the two though. I got terrible chain suck using SRAM chains, so I switched to dura-ace/XTR chain and the chain suck all but disappeared.

  14. #14
    Specialized Rida
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    Went with X.0

    Well I decided to go with Sram. I heard nothing but good stuff about the X.0 so I figured I would try it.

    the only thing I purchased was the shifter and the Rear Derailleur.
    As far as shifting is concerned it is pretty quick as they say it is and shifts really well under load or uphill without any hesitation. Which is what I look for in Shifting.

    When I had my Full XTR M960 I had the dual control levers with the rapid rise rear derialleur. the shifting on that was very impressive under load, but I think that is contributed to the rapid rise and possibly the Cassette. One thing I never had was it going out of adjustment as mentioned by other people, but I really maintain my bike really well so that might have something to do with it.

    So for comparison between the two is the Sram and XTR(not the new stuff). They would pretty much be equal as far as shifting is concerned (maybe slightly faster shifting with the X.0 stuff). So i guess the next thing to look for since they are pretty much the same is the durability and weight for those wonderin which is better.

    The only thing that I noticed with the XTR is that it almost was so smooth in it's shifting that I didn't even hear or feel it when it shifted except for a light light click when moving up rings.
    The X.0 you can feel the shifting as a normal derailleur but its fast. The only time you don't hear or feel the shifting at ALL is when you going at high speeds. i think it's almost instantanious that it doesn't give it time to do so. As for the dual thumb shifting is concerned you get used to it almost immedietly so that wasn't a problem. Nor is it really that bad as people think.

    I am using an my old XT cassette so that might have something to do with it you hearing the shifting for now.

    What I am planning on doing is running the new XTR cassette with an XTR chain. that is one thing that I won't change or even try Srams stuff in that department. I think XTR is the winner in this catagory.

    I think once I get all the drivetrain parts I need I will have one smooth and fast shifting combination.

    Thanks for everyone's input, but I had to try Sram's stuff just to see if it was better. I guess I couldn't have gone wrong either way.

  15. #15
    w3rd.
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    I've never really rode with SRAM. Ever since I've been really into racing MTB, I've ben using XT Duals, with a XT Rapid Rise rear. That was a perfect combo! I raced that bike for a good year and never had to touch the rear.

    As far as my trail bike, I have Shimano Trigger's with an XT normal in the rear. That is a terrible ride. I can't get it to ever stay on the cog or anything.

    So to wrap it up...
    -I think Shimano shifts the best with a Dual Control lever, and a Rapid Rise Rear. It does handle very, very well under loads, and never bounces off the chain. This means that my race bike will most likely run Shimano.

    -As far as my trailbike goes, I'm thinking that may have to be X9. Shimano Trigger Shifters and normal rear's don't seem to work well for me. This may be why we have the few people out there using Dual Control's that say Shimano is great, where you have the riders using Shimano Triggers saying they hate it.

    I haven't heard of anyone who uses Dual Control that has problems shifting, but I'm sure once that person reads this, we'll see the rant.

    My .02

  16. #16
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    Im on XO for a year after being strictly on XTR.

    Frankly, Im not impressed. XO is good and all. Has some good traits. But Im not seeing a level of performance heads and shoulders above XTR that would make me yank all my XTR stuff off my other bikes and throw it in the trash like so many seem to do (figuratively, anyways).

    XO is good. Real good. But lets face it...its enjoyed A LOT of hype the last few years.

  17. #17
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    I've never rode many time with SRAM (only few times) and I'm using shimano XT Dual Control shifters with rapid rise derailleur, and it works perfect. For me, shimano derailleurs seem more durable than SRAM, which have more plastic parts and seem more fragile.

  18. #18
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    I find it very interesting that you guys hang around the Shimano forum to put Shimano down. It's as if you have to justify your overpriced equipment to yourselves. You rarely see it the other way around. We are not talking about rocket science here. It is merely a mechanical device to move a chain up and down a cog set. No other company has the resources for R & D like Shimano and they constantly strive to improve their products. If you think you are buying an US made product, think again. All SRAM is made in Asia, and for their prices, do me a favour!

    2007 Shimano XTR rear derailleur - $160

    2006 SRAM X.O rear derailleur - $235

    I've run full XTR since February 2004 on an Intense 5point5 and never had so much as a glitch. Had to replace a few derailleur hangers though.

    Ronnie.
    The trouble with having an open mind is that people will insist on trying to put things in it.

  19. #19
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    If you have not ridden 2007 XTR shifters then do your self a favor. Without question they are the most advanced MTB shifter ever. You can thumb it like Sram or pull with the index finger like previous models. You can shift one gear at a time or two depending how far you push the lever. Also the shifting is instantaneous. Once you pull or push the trigger it shifts, no more waiting for the lever to return.

    Trust me on this. Best. Shifters. Ever.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by compression
    I noticed that the shifting would stay true and crisp ALOT longer when you use the XTR cable kits. They have sealed ferreuls, specially lined housings, rubber wipers at each housing end, and a teflon coated cable. I ran those for a full year here with no maintenance,....then I did an off-road duathalon and it was an insane complete mudfest, my wheels would not even turn because of all the mud. cables were replaced after that.
    Fully agree with you, I find a lot of people spend a large sum of money on a decent groupset then use crappy cables... why?! The XTR cables are very good and keep my shifting perfect and I ride the wet sloppy stuff in the UK, not touched the adjustment for ages. Yes the sram stuff isn't so sensitive but I prefer the feel of the shimano shift (must be my weeny thumbs )

  21. #21
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    I have XO/X9 bikes and like it and XTR/XT bikes and love those as well. Shimano does require more tweaking since it's more precise where SRAM allows more slop. Since, I maintain my bikes religously, if all else being equal (like price), you can't go wrong with either choice. However, price is not equal in this case and XTR seems more affordable than X0, I'd go with XTR (or XT).

  22. #22
    Mtc
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    When I push on a XTR shifter I think airplane cockpit quality.
    When I push on a SRAM shifter I think Tonka. If you can get past hitting the shifter with your hand(I can't move it far enough inward) it works OK.

  23. #23
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    Shimano seems to be more prone to dirty cable. SRAM more prone on short chain.
    When setup properly, XTR feels expensive. SRAM is just OK.
    On real dirt, it may be different story.
    I heard many non-smooth pulleys on SRAM, while Shimano may be less positive-shifting when dirty.
    When used with certain horst-link bikes, you may need some trick with Shimano.
    Quality wise: Shimano

  24. #24
    Mtc
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    If you use an XTR cable set on both, Shimano wins in any condition. Does SRAM have a quality cable set?

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