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  1. #301
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    Is it pronounced:
    -Set?
    -Set-tay?
    -Seh-tay?
    -Say-What?

    I'm guessing Seh-tay.

  2. #302
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    Early impressions.

    LD: 07/05/09, 07/08/09

    My narrow Ace tires sank on the muddy trail. It bobbed as I pedalled harder. Sadly, I had to get off and walk the bike until I got to dry ground. My HT's wider tires negotiate this kind of terrain better.

    Carlos's broken frame ran through my mind as I went over small logs. Good news, no problems there. I am excdited to try going over a pile of logs that my HT has a hard time tackling. One of the reasons I decided to get the ace is its high bottom bracket clearance. I'm gonna go for that obstacle when the trail dries out.

    I set the Tora Air 302 shocks a tad stiffer from its mid setting and ran down a 25 -30 degree slope that quickly winds to a turn, up and down in a roller coaster. The shocks held, albeit rasping, as if out of breath. My Ace, nevertheless, negotiated that section of the trail quickly.

    The tora air socks continued its asthmatic wheeze as I sped down a straight but rough slope(this bike is fast). It was a lot of fun except for disconcerting rattling at the back. It could be the chain slapping on the chain stay, but I couldn't turn my head to check. Then the crackle and popping started up front. It sounded like stones hitting the spokes/disc plate or what not. These noises are very freaky.

    I'm getting to know my Ace a little better each time I ride it. Compared to my HT, my Sette Ace is fast. It just does not feel as strong. But, the jury is still out on that. My Ace could be just as strong, perhaps stronger - I just don't know it yet.

  3. #303
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbici
    Is it pronounced:
    -Set?
    -Set-tay?
    -Seh-tay?
    -Say-What?

    I'm guessing Seh-tay.
    LOL!

  4. #304
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    That would be

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbici
    Is it pronounced:
    -Set?
    -Set-tay?
    -Seh-tay?
    -Say-What?

    I'm guessing Seh-tay.
    Set.
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  5. #305
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMac47
    Set.
    What about the accent above the last "e" on the frame?
    Woudn't it be pronounced "teh"?

    Is there an English professor in the house?

  6. #306
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    I know it's supposed to be French or Italian, but I still call my bike a Settie

  7. #307
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skeeno
    I know it's supposed to be French or Italian, but I still call my bike a Settie
    I'd like to take the logo off completely and rename it Lance Armstrong

  8. #308
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbici
    Is it pronounced:
    -Set?
    -Set-tay?
    -Seh-tay?
    -Say-What?

    I'm guessing Seh-tay.


    Here you go........

    http://forvo.com/word/sette/

    Click on the little arrow next to "Pronunciation by mafaldastasi"



    BTW.... my Ace just arrived... can't wait to get home and start putting her together.

  9. #309
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    Quote Originally Posted by abramsgunner
    Here you go........

    http://forvo.com/word/sette/

    Click on the little arrow next to "Pronunciation by mafaldastasi"



    BTW.... my Ace just arrived... can't wait to get home and start putting her together.
    Ah Ha! Great link, thank you! Be sure to post pictures of your "Set-Teh"!

  10. #310
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    That's what I thought.

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbici
    Ah Ha! Great link, thank you! Be sure to post pictures of your "Set-Teh"!
    7. Pronounced 'set'.........I think anyway.
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  11. #311
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    This thread is immortal :/

  12. #312
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwanttolookatpics
    This thread is immortal :/
    Just a thought, maybe it's time to move this thread and create a new Sette forum. Obviously, the OP's original question asked about the Ace's performance relative to XC racing and training, but over time, much of the discussion has drifted away.

    I'm sure MTBR can get PP to sponsor it.
    I'm gravity challenged, adrenaline deficient, and looking for that endorphine high. Shout out, I'll move out of the way. :-)

  13. #313
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    Got her all put together... don't have a pic right now but I bought the white one so it should be pretty easy to imagine what it looks like.... LOL

    I've only put a couple of short test runs around the block while tweaking the cockpit. First impressions are... man this thing feels tall, weight is not bad, I don't notice any bob from peddling even when the shock is full open, my tora 318 is a boat anchor compared to the rest of the bike, I may want a set-back seatpost, I haven't put any real seat time on a FS frame bike... so I may not know what good feels like, but I like it.

    Build went pretty easy. I've never built from a bare frame before, but have swapped out a lot of parts. I did sand down the surfaces of the headtube and bottom bracket tube. I used a CC S-3 headset and it took a couple tries to get the cups in evenly, but I did get them to go it using the all-thread and washers $4 press. I chased the bottom bracket threads with an old cartridge style BB before installing my Shimano external cups. The leftside cup felt like it may be crossthreading, even after the old BB screwed right in, so took a chance and put a little more muscle on it and it went in just fine. The right side went in without a hitch. The rest of the components went right on, cables weren't too tough although I may need to shorten one or two.

    I did find that the freehub on my new BWW Mavic 719/XT disc wheelset has a minor squeal when coasting in the largest rear cog. If the chain is on a smaller cog, it's quiet. I emailed BWW to ask what they recommend. If it comes down to sending the wheel back, I may just replace the freehub rather than be without a rear wheel for the round trip. Freehubs are pretty cheap, and I tore apart my hardtail to build my ACE.. so I would be without a ride... (It has V-brakes so my old wheels won't work)

    If I can find my camera, I'll post a pic later.


    PS. I don't think this frame really needs the platform settings on the shock... bob is very mild, even with the shock wide open. Also, I'm about 220 lbs ready to ride, and 180 psi gave me just shy of 20% sag.

  14. #314
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    Got my first real ride in... I haven't ridden enough different bikes to be any sort of expert, but I like it. I put 11 miles in on my backyard 2.5 mile loop, two thirds sandy jeep trail with long slow ups and downs, one third road. I don't feel the ACE gives up anything to my hardtail. I didn't notice any bob on the dirt, or even the road until I actually locked out the front and rear suspension. Once both ends were locked out I realized the difference between active and locked. I never felt like the suspension was robbing me of power. My loop is not technical, or tight, but the ACE handles as well as my hardtail. As expected, I found it easier to carry speed on the rutted downhills, and felt more in control without the tail end bouncing off of everything. I've about got the cockpit dialed in, and hope to put some miles on one of out tighter local trails this weekend. It isn't very technical either, but it is very tight singletrack with lots of switchbacks and some fun rollers.

  15. #315
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    sette vs ibex

    Hey guys,
    So I am sure that I am in a bit of a biased room, but I am debating between the Ace Build and an IBEX Asta Comp. The asta has slightly better components, but also costs $300 more (I'll probably drop some money on used fork off ebay) so when all is said and done, I pretty much want to get the bike with the better frame. Wanted to know if any of you have any experience with these frames. I'd like to go with the better climber between the two, but also have something I am comfortable doing a 20-30 mile ride on and small 2-3 foot drops. Any input would be appreciated.

  16. #316
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    Sette Ace Handling

    I built a Sette Ace late last year, have been riding it 3~4 times per week with no issues. Most rides are in the Red Mountain area, Hawes, Saguaro, Mine Trail, TRW. I've cleaned the front side of pass Mountain with it, taken it around the back side of Pass Mountain (just follow the blood trail), It's been up Mormon and down National at South Mountain a few times, Javelina, Desert Classic, Estrella park loops, Mcdowel park loops, even a full day and 25 or so miles at Gooseberry. This bike has had ZERO structural problems ,or any indication of being too weak for the task. I did build it with an XTR drive train initially, and have since converted to SRAM X9 RD and shifter, the bike is awesome for most XC trails. It is very quick handling, light, maybe a little on flexy side. Overall, it is great.

    BUILD:
    XT disks
    '08 Manitou minute elite fork, 100mm
    Romic twin tube shock w/350lb spring
    SLX Crankset
    X9 RD, X9 shiftetr
    XTR FD, XT shifter
    Azonic Stem
    Titec carbon riser bar (31.8)
    Sette lock on grips
    FSA pig headset
    FSA carbon seat-post
    CB candy pedals
    XT 32spoke front hub, DT SS spokes, Alex TD17 rim
    DT 340 24 spoke rear hub, DT SS spokes, Sun XC lite rim

    The XTR RD actually worked fine, but required regular adjustments. The SRAM X-9 RD just runs and runs and runs...it also offers up noticeably crisper shifts.

    The Romic shock, although maybe a little dated, works awesome enough that I don't care about the added weight. It has sophisticated valving to minimize "bob", it is easy to adjust, it has a wide range of adjustability, and it is essentially maintenance free. The Manitou S-type SRL that came with the frame worked decent when it had air in it, but lacked the adjustability and was unable to hold its pressure (PITA).

    It looks just like all the rest in the pics (pretty *****en actually) so I'll spare the photo album submissions...
    Check my pulse...

  17. #317
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    5bravobravo - any pics?

  18. #318
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    Will it never go away?

    Quote Originally Posted by abramsgunner
    Biker46... Tora SoloAirs are noisy on rebound.. the wheezzz is normal. It will quiet down some as you break it in, and you will forget about it. My Tora 318 did/does the same thing.. freaked me out at first.
    You mention "quiet down." So it did not go away completely? My Tora 302 solo air "wheezz" when I pull the front end up, even with the lock out on! What would you say is a good replacement shocks that is compatible with the Sette Ace frame?

  19. #319
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    Biker46, It's the nature of the beast I think. Keep in mind I could be wrong... but I did a search as soon as I heard my Tora 318 gasp on rebound thinking it had a problem, and found several posts on its sound effects. At that point, I just decided to ignore it and ride.

    I think the Tora is probably the best bang for the buck. I haven't ridden any other forks lately, so I can't tell you if there are any that are more quiet. I don't notice the noise much (got about 175 miles on it), although it is still there, so I won't be replacing my Tora until I can afford/justify buying a lighter fork (Reba, SID, or Fox F100 series).

    My 318 is set at 100mm, and I think the full bike comes with 120mm fork... so anything in that range should be fine.

  20. #320
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    To all Sette Owners - I couldn't find any decent communities for Sette Owners so I created one via an open blog for anyone to register and contribute at Sette Riders - I'd love to get all Sette Owners a place where we can share our Sette Stories and product reviews Cheers, Matthew

  21. #321
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    Quote Originally Posted by spider_templar
    To all Sette Owners - I couldn't find any decent communities for Sette Owners so I created one via an open blog for anyone to register and contribute at Sette Riders - I'd love to get all Sette Owners a place where we can share our Sette Stories and product reviews Cheers, Matthew
    Where's the forum bit?
    ....Setté Phantom....

  22. #322
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    It should be live shortly....

  23. #323
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    jw8725, I've enabled the forum - had to change the theme slightly to fit everything in, but all Sette Owners and Critics are welcome http://www.setteriders.com - the Forum link is in the header navigation

  24. #324
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    Quote Originally Posted by spider_templar
    jw8725, I've enabled the forum - had to change the theme slightly to fit everything in, but all Sette Owners and Critics are welcome http://www.setteriders.com - the Forum link is in the header navigation
    Dude have a look in the Site Feedback/Issues section of this forum, there are some posts people have made regarding a Sette section. You may want to spam them
    ....Setté Phantom....

  25. #325
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    Will do for sure, thanks for the heads up

  26. #326
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    Hey guys, I've posted my first thoughts on the Kenda Krusher tires that come stock on the Sette Ace as well on Sette Riders...

  27. #327
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    I'm new to mtbing and my currient bike doesn't have components worth switching out. Should I buy the complete bike, or go for the frame?

  28. #328
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    Dwgfan91, I've been super happy with my Sette Ace so far - I went with the whole bike, not just the frame. You can read about my experience over at http://www.setteriders.com - The Sette Ace has solid components for the value for sure - it's been a great bike so far

  29. #329
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    edit**

  30. #330
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    Quote Originally Posted by carlos-ma-xc
    Here is, well was my build. I was an early adopter (October 2007) and I have encountered a ton of people asking about the frame. I really like the bike and have posted a review in the frame section. I'm curious to know how people feel about the geometry of this frame. I found it a little front heavy but the steep head tube angle made the bike corner well and made the bottom bracket height nice. I was never in love with the shock and am glad to see it has been changed on the new bikes.

    But I also have some bad news...sorry to hijack this thread



    Unfortunately after an endo over a log last week the bike started creaking really bad and I discovered a crack on my down tube. I have not been able to find anyone who has needed to file a warranty claim with Sette yet. I'm curious to know if there is anyone out there who has tried to get a frame repaired.

    I don't want to discourage anyone from purchasing an Ace. If anything I figured this would be a good opportunity to see if Sette is prepared to stand behind their product. Anyway I'll keep you guys updated with my progress.

    -carlos

    Im really anxious to see how they handle the warranty. PLEASE KEEP US INFORMED!

  31. #331
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    Edit**

  32. #332
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    I bought the bike two weeks ago. Not impressed with the front Rock Shock. seems to be more of a Freeride fork than a XC fork. Makes me feel to high up. The Avid Juicy 3 front brake doesnt have the stopping power of v brakes in my opinion. seems to rip through the woods with no problems and coming from XTR shifters and der, the x-7 do a fantastic job. Really dont even feel them shift. real smooth in that department. The bike has excellent clearance over logs, reminds me of my old ProFlex, never bottoming out on log crossings. This is a plus in my opinion, to never have the bottom of your pedal and bottom bracket or cogs hitting things. All in all for the money and what they are charging out there, cant go wrong. Just make your personal changes and setup and it will be a great investment. Got to get the Econ grips, really makes a difference.

  33. #333
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    so you think building it up is the best way, since the shock doesnt seem to fit the bike? Or are you saying it doesnt fit your riding style?

    thanks

  34. #334
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    bthornell, I completely agree with you on the shifting the SRAM components do an excellent job imo as well. afa the fork goes, I'm coming from a rigid hard tail (Cannondale M300) so the rock shox that comes on the Ace is a dream for me. I don't have another fork to compare it to and I really like it a lot. So I'd say for folks coming from a rigid, you'd be fine. That's jmho though

    Cheers, Matthew
    http://www.setteriders.com

  35. #335
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    The fork, Rock Shock Tora with its 120mm plushness makes the bike front end taller and I am a bit more user to riding in more of an aggessive riding position. however, When I first took it to the trail to dial it in I ended up riding faster. Dont know if its because of the positioning on the bike. You will love the butter shifting though. all other parts seem to be just fine. I would even race this bike if I still could. You cant put this bike together at the new lower price they are selling it for. All other bikes with lower end parts start off at or around 1500.00. I dont think you can go wrong with the bike for the money. Just take it to the shop after getting your first ride in and have them fix whatever needes touching up and you will be fine. but then again this is my opinion on the bike. Im gonna change out the fork eventually and leave everything else the same. Oh, I did replace the riser bar with a flat bar and added the new econ grips which are fantastic. Gotta get those puppies. takes all the numbness out of you hands and you have a better platform under your palms. Good Luck

  36. #336
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    What econ / egon grips are being used on these sette's?

    I am going to race my ace in 24 hours of moab.

  37. #337
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    Good job! Warranty Status

    Sorry this is so behind. I sent off a few emails right away and was ignored so I went off and bought a new frame cause I couldn't be without a bike. Moved all the parts to the new frame and the Sette has been sitting at home starring at me for the last month.

    Thankfully Price Point is helping me out. I am sending the frame back to them for an evaluation but early indications are that they are going to fix it under warranty. Unfortunately cause this is all done via mail it is going to be a slow process. If you need to file a warranty claim you'll be without a bike for several weeks.

    carlos

  38. #338
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    so they (price-point) have the bike currently and preliminarily think it will be covered?

    Thanks for the update Carlos!

    That is the bad part (waiting for shipping, evaluation and return), but would be with any smaller company that doesnt have dealers in every town.

  39. #339
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    This is a super interesting. I am considering buying one of these bikes too, but due to where I live I am limited to what is easily available without importing at a huge cost. My Maxam Light Heavyweight is beginning to show its age - love that bike and I will probably keep it all the same. But as it is 11 years of being out of the loop on components I would like any opinions on the spec that is available here (Peru). 90% of my riding is off road on dirt roads and single track - like the downhill, but don't do any dropoffs or jumps. A thing I am concerned about here is that there is a lot of clay and can stop a wheel from turning if it is raining.
    Setté - model Ace XC-1 2009
    suspensión delantera: RockShox Dart 3 con poploc
    suspensión posterior: RockShox Monarch 3.3
    Disc brakes: Avid BB-5 de 160mm
    descarrilador delantero: Sram 3.0
    descarrilador posterior: Sram X4 8v 11-32
    palancas de cambios (shifter): Sram X4
    Break levers: Avid FR-5
    Chain: KMC Z72S 8v
    Cassette: Sram PC.850 8v
    Catalina Truvativ Isoflow 3.0
    Tires: Kenda Smoker 26x2.10"
    Rims: Mavic 223

    Any opinions or thoughts most appreciated (BTW - upgrading would be an option on the next trip up north - but not likely for a year)

  40. #340
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    Quote Originally Posted by RogCat
    Setté - model Ace XC-1 2009
    suspensión delantera: RockShox Dart 3 con poploc
    suspensión posterior: RockShox Monarch 3.3
    Disc brakes: Avid BB-5 de 160mm
    descarrilador delantero: Sram 3.0
    descarrilador posterior: Sram X4 8v 11-32
    palancas de cambios (shifter): Sram X4
    Break levers: Avid FR-5
    Chain: KMC Z72S 8v
    Cassette: Sram PC.850 8v
    Catalina Truvativ Isoflow 3.0
    Tires: Kenda Smoker 26x2.10"
    Rims: Mavic 223

    Any opinions or thoughts most appreciated (BTW - upgrading would be an option on the next trip up north - but not likely for a year)
    Not a fan of the Dart fork, a Tora would give you a stiffer fork with better performance. Okay, I'm spoiled, before the days of 9spd, 8spd worked for me. But in this day, I'm leery of the quality that SRAM would put into their 3.0 and X4 8spd line. I'd be more comfortable with X5 or better X7 drive train just from a reliability and durability perspective. BB5 mech disc is good. If built right, Mavic 223 is a good wheel.
    I'm gravity challenged, adrenaline deficient, and looking for that endorphine high. Shout out, I'll move out of the way. :-)

  41. #341
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    Over the 200 mile mark.

    Hey guys, I passed the 200 mile mark a couple of days ago. I've gotten over the good looks of my Sette Ace and now appreciate more what it can do. If you remember, I mentioned a pile of logs I was having problems going over with my HT Giant and wanted to try my Sette Ace on, well, No Problemo! I was over without a hitch.

    The Rock shox Tora 302 that came stock with the bike still hiss, wheez, gasp, whatever, and still annoys me. However, they hold without problems on small jumps, maybe 1 to feet kind of jumps and the pop lock is a great extra that really helps me in going up slopes.

    The tires are a different story, though. The Kenda krusher needs a lot to the desired. It slips and slides on roots and rocks. Forget it on muddy and loose sand trails. As an example, I was free wheeling down a 25 - 30 degree rough old paved slope that had mud on certain spots: The Kenda Krusher wiggles when it rides over those spots. I have to keep the front wheel very steady to avoid sliding.

    Yeah, replace 'em, right? Well, I feel kind of silly replacing them without putting some miles on them first. It's like throwing money away - I just don't do that. So, for now, I'll use my Sette Ace when the trails are in reasonable condition and use my HT otherwise.

    The Avid hydraulic brakes takes some getting used to. I've thought that mechanical disc be better and easier to maintain but then, I'll give myself more time to get used to the hydraulic disc brakes which feels a little soft compared to my HT V-brakes and my friends mechanical hard disc brakes.

    I'm getting used to both shifters, the Sram on Sette Ace vs the Shimano on my HT. I am appreciating the 27 speed much more on my Sette Ace compared to the 24 on my HT.

    At first, I thought the weight of my HT is a plus, giving me that solid feel. I think so still. Consequently, I become conscious of its weight now that I have my Ace which is about 8 pounds lighter. Light is good, but I wonder, if strength is a trade off. In any case, until proven otherwise, at 30 lbs the stock PP Sette Ace is not bad.

    Well, that's it for now. I hope that some readers gets something out of my ride experience.

    BTW, I made very little changes to my SA XC.: I replaced the Shimano pedals with my no name dual side pedals, just because I'm used to them. I also changed the grips. I installed a speedometer just to track my mileage and installed a rear mud guard.

    So far, things are cool...

  42. #342
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    torque specs?

    I neglected to wash the sweat off the frame after a hot ride a couple weeks ago, and yesterday noticed a little rust around the hardware holding the rear shock to the top-tube. I want to pull the top of the shock loose and clean up the rust, but can't find anything about the torque settings when I put it back together. I downloaded the Monarch manual, and of course it says to refer to the bike's manual for torque specs, and not to over or under torque it... LOL

    Also, for those that are interested.. I used tacky green marine grease on the headset and bottom bracket when I built up the frame. While i was going over the frame, I noticed the grease was discoloring the paint at the bottom bracket and headtube... giving it a yellow tinge where the tubes and bearings meet. It doesn't bother me any, but was unexpected.

    I noticed all this while installing a little protection for my frame. As you know, the cables tend to rub the paint when the rear suspesion is active. I ordered up $9 worth of VentureShield automotive film off fleabay and cut some patches to cover my frame at all the points where things tend to rub.. turned out great, and will hopefully hold up for a while.

    Anyone know the specs for the bolts holding the shock to the top-tube?

  43. #343
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    Hey Guys,
    Trying to decide whether to get the Flite or the Ace..I am an overweight rider (242 lbs) and training to get down to around the 200 lb range, but I just ride to ride, no jumping, no crazy stuff..I am easy on my equipment.Will the Ace suffice or will the Flite hold up better??

  44. #344
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    ace will suffice im sure for that use. no need for higher travel if youre not hucking it off things.

  45. #345
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    Quote Originally Posted by abramsgunner
    I neglected to wash the sweat off the frame after a hot ride a couple weeks ago, and yesterday noticed a little rust around the hardware holding the rear shock to the top-tube. I want to pull the top of the shock loose and clean up the rust, but can't find anything about the torque settings when I put it back together. I downloaded the Monarch manual, and of course it says to refer to the bike's manual for torque specs, and not to over or under torque it... LOL

    Also, for those that are interested.. I used tacky green marine grease on the headset and bottom bracket when I built up the frame. While i was going over the frame, I noticed the grease was discoloring the paint at the bottom bracket and headtube... giving it a yellow tinge where the tubes and bearings meet. It doesn't bother me any, but was unexpected.

    I noticed all this while installing a little protection for my frame. As you know, the cables tend to rub the paint when the rear suspesion is active. I ordered up $9 worth of VentureShield automotive film off fleabay and cut some patches to cover my frame at all the points where things tend to rub.. turned out great, and will hopefully hold up for a while.

    Anyone know the specs for the bolts holding the shock to the top-tube?

    Did you find the torque specs from Pricepoint? Thats where id start, id like to know too since ive got the same frame.

    I also noticed that the grease I used discolored the paint (yellow hue) a bit, bummer but not the end of the world.

    And, I also ordered the lamin-x stuff and installed it around the headtube rub areas as well as the horizontal tube where it mounts to the seat tube (cable rub). works perfectly.

    The odd thing I noticed about the frame was the placement of the cable cup for the front derailleur. I use an X9 front derailleur and it seems the cup is placed on the opposite side of where it should be. still works fine though.

    Ive put about 75 miles on the bike so far and absolutely love it. handles everything I throw at it and no squeaks, noises, bumps at all.

    my setup:
    SRAM X9 build kit
    Rockshox revelation U-turn fork
    DT 5.1d rims/BWW hubs
    BB7 brakes (already owned but will upgrade soon)
    super fortress cables

    pics to come soon.

  46. #346
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    I never got the specs.. I did email, but never got a reply... the downside to buying an economy frame I guess. I'm still quite happy with my ace after a few hundred miles, she's not sexy, but quite functional.. LOL

  47. #347
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    yeah, my flite has been great so far. good luck!

  48. #348
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    torque spec

    Is that an M6 Socket Head? I'm guessing it is not SS, else it would not be rusting.

    If it's an M6, it should be torqued to around 12ft/lbs, M5 will need around 8ft/lbs. The numbers vary a little depending on whether the threads are lubed, and which material, but you are mostly looking for the fastener to be tight enough to stay secured. If you over torque it enough to yield the material, you will probably know it. typically, the threads will fail and you will be scurrying around looking for a replacement bolt/nut (assuming you are able to remove the buggered one).

    I use loctite 242 on almost everything on my bike, and failures are few and far between.

    The Sette Ace is nice, light, super quick handling, a bit flimsy compared to my Slayer, but I like it and ride it quite a bit. I probably have about 300mi now with no issues.
    Check my pulse...

  49. #349
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    Torque spec for all the pivot points in the rear of an ACE:
    150 in-lbs
    or
    16.94 NM
    or
    12.49 ft-lbs

    Take your pick. Sette sent me the specs in in-lbs, I just converted them to other units. Took a long time for them to respond, but really was not in a hurry. Love the frame. Will post pictures when finished.

  50. #350
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    Outstanding... now I won't worry about shearing anything off... thanks guys!

  51. #351
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    Just a thought to the guys with squishy sounding forks. The forks usually make those noises at slower rebound settings. I can actually tune my fork by the sound it makes. odd I know.
    -Don "LordDRIFT" Draper.

  52. #352
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    I just ordered the complete Sette Ace bike and I'm excited to try it out, but I know I'm not going to be impressed with the Tora 302 fork. I have a brand new Tora 318 solo air that I was going to use on another build but never got around to it. Could I use a 130mm fork with this frame? I know Sette recommends using a fork no longer than 120mm but has anyone used a 130mm and if so did you have any problems? To me 10mm just doesn't seem like it would make such a drastic geometry change that it could cause frame failure, but then again if I was sure I wouldn't be asking you guys.


    Thanks for your info.

  53. #353
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    Quote Originally Posted by BR-26354
    Could I use a 130mm fork with this frame? I know Sette recommends using a fork no longer than 120mm but has anyone used a 130mm and if so did you have any problems? To me 10mm just doesn't seem like it would make such a drastic geometry change that it could cause frame failure, but then again if I was sure I wouldn't be asking you guys.
    Thanks for your info.
    I wouldn't do it for two reasons. One - It will probably void the warranty. 10mm isn't much for a lot of things in life, but for bicycle geometry it's actually a pretty substanstial difference. Two - I have 115mm fork on my Ace now and although I like the extra travel over the 100mm fork I had on it first, it's right on the edge of being too long for the frame in terms of steering response and keeping the front wheel planted.

  54. #354
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    Your 318 should be adjustable with spacers though, and you can knock her down to 100mm. I really like my 318@100/Ace combo.

    I don't know where you buy the spacers.. I bought mine at 100mm, but you should be able to find them with a little digging... Google is your friend

  55. #355
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    Quote Originally Posted by BR-26354
    I just ordered the complete Sette Ace bike and I'm excited to try it out, but I know I'm not going to be impressed with the Tora 302 fork. I have a brand new Tora 318 solo air that I was going to use on another build but never got around to it. Could I use a 130mm fork with this frame? I know Sette recommends using a fork no longer than 120mm but has anyone used a 130mm and if so did you have any problems? To me 10mm just doesn't seem like it would make such a drastic geometry change that it could cause frame failure, but then again if I was sure I wouldn't be asking you guys.
    Use a Crank Brothers Opium headset, it has 5mm smaller lower stack then most.

  56. #356
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    Quote Originally Posted by abramsgunner
    Your 318 should be adjustable with spacers though, and you can knock her down to 100mm. I really like my 318@100/Ace combo.

    I don't know where you buy the spacers.. I bought mine at 100mm, but you should be able to find them with a little digging... Google is your friend
    Actually, my 318 is already at 100mm, I haven't had the spacers taken out yet to extend it to 130mm, so I can just have the steerer cut and pop it on. How is the ride with 100mm 318? How does it handle the descents?

    thanks

  57. #357
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    What fork would you guys reccomend for the Ace. I am in the same vote as BR and would replace the fork soon after purchase of complete bike.

  58. #358
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    Personally I wouldn't replace the fork for a while as the 302 probably is not total junk. If you do replace it, after shopping around I decided the best bang for the buck is the 318 (but my experience with forks is limited).. above the 318, I'd go all out and drop $500-600 on a decent Fox, or a Reba or Sid. I just can't believe going from the 302 to th 318 would be worth the cash.

    The reason I didn't go with a lighter, racing class fork was the same reason I went with a $479 frame... just don't have the play money to spend (my kids like to eat every day, sometimes twice a day).

    BR-26354, As far decents go... well hell, I live in South Alabama.. we don't have much in the way of decents.. but I like the Ace with 100mm on the tight trails we have in my neck of the woods.

  59. #359
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    Quote Originally Posted by abramsgunner
    Personally I wouldn't replace the fork for a while as the 302 probably is not total junk. If you do replace it, after shopping around I decided the best bang for the buck is the 318 (but my experience with forks is limited).. above the 318, I'd go all out and drop $500-600 on a decent Fox, or a Reba or Sid. I just can't believe going from the 302 to th 318 would be worth the cash.

    The reason I didn't go with a lighter, racing class fork was the same reason I went with a $479 frame... just don't have the play money to spend (my kids like to eat every day, sometimes twice a day).

    BR-26354, As far decents go... well hell, I live in South Alabama.. we don't have much in the way of decents.. but I like the Ace with 100mm on the tight trails we have in my neck of the woods.
    I had already bought the 318 brand new for another build that is getting put on the back burner, so it's good to hear you're getting solid performance out of the fork. I hate to have this thing just lying around going to waste, so I'm going to go ahead and switch out the 302 for the 318 at 100mm because it sounds like a good balance for the Ace and it seems it would compliment the Monarch 2.1 better than the 302 could. I'm an aggressive rider but I still think I will get a better ride out of the 100mm 318 than the 302 at 120mm because I've heard only good things about the 318 while hearing only negative comments concerning the 302. I'll probably just craiglist the 302.

    Thanks for the input.

  60. #360
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    If you want to buy a new fork and aren't sure about length, try gettnig an adjustable length fork like a U-Turn fork from RockShox. My Recon 351 U-Turn is adjustable from 85-130mm. I think Jenson has them on closeout for $180

  61. #361
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    OK I put this bad boy together about a week ago and I got it about 80% dialed in. I don't know about race worthy but it is definitely faster than my modded k2 hardtail which was the donor for everything but the crankset/bb and headset and of course cables and housing. BTW this is my first FS rig & First bike build. I've been doing this for about 6 months now.

    I should note that my brake mounting surfaces and head tube came freshly faced, and bb reamed and faced - very impressive so far.

    First ride out was impressive; the bike felt incredibly light (compared to the k2) and I could feel a surge of acceleration with every pedal rotation. I also found myself carrying more speed as I could now pedal around most corners now due to the higher bb. Speaking of corners - this thing railed them!

    I had the 100mm 335 recon from my HT. I upped the sag to from 15% to 20% to match the rear sag. I left the rebound the same, and ran the rear 3 clicks from full fast (without curb test). No noticeable bob so far but the rear felt stiffer than I thought it ought to be. It wasn't soaking up the bumps like I thought it should. It was still more comfortable than my HT but didn't seem plush enough. I upped the rear sag to 25% same rebound. It felt a tad better but, I was still not overly impressed.

    I came to a fairly mild step down descent that was in the middle of a turn. I lost control of the front. The bike was way front heavy going down, and the fork was sloppy as hell. So now I'm a little shook. The next descent was the same was the same even with my hind off the saddle and over the rear wheel. I dropped the seat and found it to be better at the cost of uncomfortable pedaling and less power. I chose power, so up went the seat. I need more rake; I need more travel, and was wishing for 120mm.

    Climbing: I used to stay seated on the HT to climb mega steep stuff. Any standing would result in loss of traction under power. On the ace I failed the first climb- I almost tipped backwards. On the next climb I scooted way up and leaned way forward ...no probs there and no loss of traction. I went back to the first climb and scooting forward didn't help - I made the choice to stand; wow! The thing just blasted up the hill hooking up all the way. I am smiling and patting myself on the back for a skeptical purchase. No regrets!

    The next day I tuned to the curb test. I stiffened the front a bit and used a slightly faster rebound to get it to one bounce. Now here is the interesting part: for the rear I had to use a setting of 1 click from slowest to get the rear to down to one bounce. I thought: this cant be right. Back to the trail. With the new settings the front felt better but I was on a different trail (root and rock hell to put the squishy through its paces). It felt like cheating. It was like butter now and i was staying seated more and more. Wow! I was running up on others and leaving them just as quick (No racers of course). I even got compliments on the bike from tights wearing snobbies - now that's impressive! So Now the rear is dialed in and the front is better. I Got a tip on how to mod the front to 120mm, which I have done. I won't be able to hit the trail til tomorrow though.

    Picks below show fork at 120mm

    * Frame Size & Color: Sette Ace Large (White?)
    * Fork: RockShox Recon 335 - 120mm mod
    * Brakes: Avid BB7 w/Hayes rotors
    * Cranks: Truvativ Stylo 3.3
    * Front Derailleur: Sram X7
    * Rear Derailleur: Sram X7
    * Pedals: Shimano M520
    * Stem: Race Face Evolve XC 90mm
    * Handlebar: Race Face Evolve XC 26"
    * Seatpost: Race Face Evolve XC
    * Saddle:WTB Pure V
    * Bottom Bracket: Truvativ Giga X Pipe
    * Cassette:Sram PG 970
    * Headset: Race Face Dues
    * Grips: Lizard Skins Moab Lock ons.
    * Front Tire: Bontrager Big kahuna 2.1
    * Front Rim: Generic K2
    * Front Hub/Skewer:gk2
    * Rear Tire: Kenda Nevegal 2.1 DTC
    * Rear Rim:gk2
    * Rear Hub/Skewer: gk2
    * Weight: dunno

    Plan to change next week : wheelset and tires all around, seat post.











    -Don "LordDRIFT" Draper.

  62. #362
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    I just got my Sette Ace delivered today and I can't express how thoroughly impressed I am with the overall quality of the bike from how well the bike was packaged to how solid the frame build is. I was equally surprised with the down tube. Is it hydro-forme? Either way, it was a nice touch that I was not aware of when I bought the bike. This frame is very sano looking and extremely light.

    I swapped out the stem, handle bars, seat post and tires, but I think I'm going to give the 302 a fair shake before I switch to my 318 and see how it holds up. It looks stout enough, but we'll see. I'm stoked about this bike and I can't believe it only cost me 1k. Awesome bike for an even more awesome price.

  63. #363
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    Took it back out with 120mm.....PERFECT!
    -Don "LordDRIFT" Draper.

  64. #364
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    Hey BR, give us some thoughts on the complete bike, especially the front fork. I was going to order one yesterday, but the sale on me and the wifes rental property fell through yesterday. It sucks because we were closing on the house this Friday. Cannot afford to buy a bike when your paying two house notes. It sucks, because I am wanting a new bike bad.

    LordDrift I love the bike with the Race Face goodies. I am jealous....

  65. #365
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    The complete bike, which is what I ordered, is impressive, especially the frame. You upgrade the cockpit, and it is a very flashy looking bike that backs it up with great handling. Yeah, the 302 got anything but rave reviews, but my initial impression has been good. It's easy to set up, and rides good. It is a bit noisy but tracks well and soaked up the bumps well. It's definitely not so bad that you need to upgrade it right away. Unless it fails, I'm going to beat the crap out of it, then upgrade. The wheels are friggin' sweet. Mavic X719s laced to XT hubs? That's impossible to beat at this price, and the drive train is solid. Nothing flashy, just reliable and smooth. Truvativ makes great cranks and X-7 is on the same level as Shimano's LX or SLX. And the Juicy 3's are awesome if you know how to set up hydraulic brakes. I get sick of all the peeps that think you need to have Avid Cr's or Maguras in order to have good hydros...it's all in the set up. My Juicy 3's are powerful and quiet.

    I ordered the bike with Sette Edge OS stem and bars (both white) and they look and feel just as high quality as the frame does, and the frame is impressive. It looks killer in all white, too. I also ordered a pair of Sette locking grips, and they feel just as solid as the pair of Lizard Skins Peaty grips I had on my last bike. The Sette Amp seat that comes with the bike was a nice surprise; again I was impressed by the Sette product line. The seat not only looks really good, it's actually really comfortable. I also sprung for a pair of Panaracer Rampage 2.35 tires and I'm glad I did because the Kenda Crushers that come on the bike are junk. The stock bars, stem and seat post will work just fine, but I had the cash so I wanted to dress the bike up a bit, but new tires are a must, those wire bead Kendas aren't worth one ride, they look horrible.

    Hey, Rocket, I have to admit, before the bike arrived I was a little put off by having a Sette bike with a bunch of Sette parts on it, but I was in the same spot as you. My funds were limited and I couldn't go any longer without a bike. I got into a financial crunch last fall and had to sell my Jamis (which I had at least $3300 invested in). I missed this entire past riding season . It was painful to say the least, so I had enough of just flipping through mags and wishing I had the grip to buy a new bike. I have a brand new Jamis XLT 3 frame (it's an '06 but I bought it on clearance last fall after selling my other Jamis) but to finish it the way it deserves was going to cost me around $2000, and I only had about $1100 to play with. I just couldn't see myself cutting corners and throwing a bunch of low end crap on the frame and then have to turn around and upgrade it all later on. It would have just been a waste of money, so I was left with finding a bike for $1100. That's where the Sette Ace came in, and I do not regret it in the least. My Jamis XLT 3 frame is happily collecting dust now, and the way this Ace rides it may be collecting dust for a really long time. This bike is well worth the money. It's a great frame with an awesome set of wheels and a solid X-7 drive train. And believe me, when you pull it out of the box and pull off all the packaging those doubts will quickly fade. The bike is sweet.

  66. #366
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    BR, The bike sound sweet with your upgrades. If you get a chance post a picture. I will be getting the bike before next riding season, if not before. I cannot wait to get the bike and put a couple of upgrades that I want and get to riding.

  67. #367
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    18.5" available......

    I am also very impressed with the bike. I built it up from the parts from my Intense and it came out pretty nice. Unfortunately mine is on the block if anyone is interested. After several rides and adjustments, I think the 18.5" frame is just a bit small for me. Has a great feel to it and the price is just great. Also I am leaning towards more travel.. :-)
    Here is my bike and setup. If someone here is interested let me know. I would do a frame or bike or whatever. Figured I would check here before posting it up everywhere...
    Ace 18.5" with Monarch 3.3
    RS Revelation 426 Uturn
    Juicy 7
    X9 drivetrain
    XT crankset
    Thomson stem, Easton EC70 post, RF Next SL Carbon bars
    FSA XC 300 wheelset.

    - mike -

  68. #368
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    glad i found this thread i have been stalking this bike for a while and after reading this i think its time to add to my cart nice xmas gift to myself

  69. #369
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    A riding buddy here in Virgin has about six months/2500+ mles on his. We do a lot more "trailish" XC riding with some Gooseberry and Little Creek tossed in for good measure. He replaced th efork with a Magura but other than that it's stock. He has replaced the chain, tires (wear items) and the grips.. everything else is doing good.

    Might not be a Pivot or a Trek but not everyone has $3000+ large.

  70. #370
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    Hi guys,

    I have over 500 miles on my Sette Ace and ventured to do some tuning myself. Now, I'm thinking I have to learn to do this - to develop some skill in tuning my front an rear derailleurs - myself!

    I have the Sram X-7 front and back. Well, the shifting in the middle chainrings were slipping and the it takes a long deep toggle to shift to the biggest chainring in the front. So, I thought I really have no choice but to do something. Of course, I can always bring it to the nearest LBO, but I had decided to do that as a last recourse. Bottom line I have to learn how to do this myself.

    Now, I can't seem to get this thing to work. Some questions:

    - Which do you adjust first, the front or the rear derailleur?
    - Are there any tricks to adjustments or following instructions that came with the product the best way to go about it?
    - Can anyone provide personal tips or "how to" guides on fine tuning derailleurs?

    Thanks.

  71. #371
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    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Sette Ace XC - Race Worthy?-capturewiz897.jpg  


  72. #372
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    Tuning

    One thing to keep in mind is that if you have the bike up on a stand and are pedaling it by hand, it will act much differently then when it is on the ground with you pedaling it (the drive train works differently under load).

    Before you do anything, you should clean everything really well, inspect for damage to chain-rings or derailleurs, lube the chain, and perhaps make some fine adjustments to your cable tensions. Cables are a key element to drive train operation, and can make you think that there are serious issues when in fact there are minimal problems.

    Failing in that:

    The rear should be very straight-forward. Do the following:

    -Be certain that your dropout is straight so that the cogs on the rear derailleur are parallel to the cassette's chain rings.

    -disconnect the shifter cable from the rear derailleur

    -be sure you have the adjuster barrels turned all the way in (maximum slack on cable). There's an adjuster at the shifter and one at the derailleur.

    -Make sure your cables are clean and free running, no kinks in the housing or really tight bends.

    -Verify the high-low limits are set properly (chain removed).

    -For the high limit, shift to 9th gear, be sure there is slack in the cable (or it is disconnected), then look to see that the derailleur cogs are in line with the smallest cog (chain-ring) on the cassette. If they are not in line, turn the screw marked "H" to adjust the position.

    -For the low limit, push the derailleur by hand (careful not to bend anything) against its spring all the way to the inboard side and verify that the cogs align with the largest chain-ring on the cassette. Adjust the alignment by turning the screw labelled "L". Caution: if your low limit is too far in toward the hub, you can accidentally push your chain into the spokes (assuming you do not have the little plastic pie plate protector).

    -Once you are happy that the limits are set nicely, verify your shifter is in 9th gear, verify your cable is fully slacked, then pull the tail end of the cable tightly by hand and tighten the clamp screw on the rear derailleur.

    -Now you may begin to tension the cable by backing out the adjuster barrels until you get smooth up and down shifting operation. I typically start this with the chain (that should be reinstalled by now) on the middle front chain ring. The SRAM derailleurs like quite a bit of tension, I usually add tension until the up shifts (moving to smaller chain-rings on the cassette) get sluggish, then back off a little.

    Just to clarify a few things:

    The derailleur has no brain. The arm is simply spring loaded one direction (to the smallest chain-ring), and moves back and forth between the limits which are the only real adjustments. The shifter provides all the positioning inside the pod at the handlebar. These positional increments are fed back to the derailluer through the cable, and the cable tension decides how accurately the shifter increments get translated to the derailleur. Keep in mind that all you are really doing is pulling on that cable which is tied to the derailleur, effectively pulling against the spring that wants the derailleur to be against the high limit. If the cable is too tight, the derailleur will tend to downshift (move the chain up onto the bigger chain-rings of the cassette) very rapidly, and may result in the chain trying to jump up to the next bigger chain ring on its own. The upshifts will be sluggish if they occur at all due to the tension not allowing the derailleur arm to move to the smaller chain-rings...If the cable is too loose, the derailleur will not be able to get pulled up to the larger chain-rings very well, resulting in poor downshifts. In fact you may notice that the chain rides up onto the next larger chain-ring while you are pushing on the shift lever, but when you release the lever, the chain drops back down to the smaller ring...cable too loose.

    So, once you get it running smoothly on the middle front chainring, you can test the operation through the gears on both the smallest and largest front rings. Expect a little noise/dragging when the drive train is crossed up, as certain gear combination's just put too much angle on the chain. Also, before you give up on trying to tune out all the little noise and drag when the bike is in the work stand, take it down and run it down the street, you might find it works just perfectly when you are riding it.


    -For the front:
    -The front is a little more involved in some ways since it is possible to rotate the derailleur on the frame, as well as slide it up and down, but it works on the same principal as the rear (only reversed). The distance of the derailleur cage from the top chain ring as well as its alignment to the chain rings is fairly critical, and can definitely leave you chasing your tail for some time before figuring it out. So maybe be very careful about what you are doing ahead of time to avoid too much aggravation.

    I hope this helps. With my luck I have just managed to confuse you entirely (your LBS will thank me!)
    Check my pulse...

  73. #373
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    Tuning

    Quote Originally Posted by 5bravobravo
    One thing to keep in mind is that if you have the bike up on a stand and are pedaling it by hand, it will act much differently then when it is on the ground with you pedaling it (the drive train works differently under load).

    Before you do anything, you should clean everything really well,..

    I hope this helps. With my luck I have just managed to confuse you entirely (your LBS will thank me!)
    5bravobravo,

    I really appreciate your taking time to help me out. I'll use your tips/instructions and take another crack at it. Actually, I did some research on the web before doing anything, but as you know, actually knowing how is so different from thinking to know how.

    I'll let you know how it goes.

    Thanks again

  74. #374
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    Diy

    Hey, bottom line is you get some experience by getting your hands on it. If you can't get it to work right, take it to you LBS and let it get sorted out by the pro's. With luck, you'll end up with a mechanic willing to explain what the issue was, then you learn even more.

    Good luck!
    Check my pulse...

  75. #375
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5bravobravo
    Hey, bottom line is you get some experience by getting your hands on it. If you can't get it to work right, take it to you LBS and let it get sorted out by the pro's. With luck, you'll end up with a mechanic willing to explain what the issue was, then you learn even more.

    Good luck!
    5bravobravo,

    I followed your instructions on the rear derailleur and got good results. I had to adjust the high and low limit screws with the chain on since the wippermann link would not separate. In any case, the shifting seemed smooth enough.

    On the front, I followed the SRAM instructions from their website. It looked straightforward enough and I completed that in reasonable time. Here's the rub -- I get stuck tuning with the barrel adjuster: at one point the chain shifts onto all gears and at certain points, after a few turns on the barrel adjuster, gets stuck - the shifter won't shift to high gear. So, I had to readjust the cable for some slack. And so it went in dejavu fashion!

    Then, shifting skips/jumps on the middle chainrings on the rear (and I thought I had this already straightened out.) I am not sure if the rear and front derailleurs are adjusted independent from one another or if they should be adjusted together as one unit.

    In any case, I begin to lose patience after a few tries, and took recess. I am considering trying again, although I am now more inclined to have a LBS do this for me.

    What do you think?

  76. #376
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biker46
    5bravobravo,

    I followed your instructions on the rear derailleur and got good results. I had to adjust the high and low limit screws with the chain on since the wippermann link would not separate. In any case, the shifting seemed smooth enough.

    On the front, I followed the SRAM instructions from their website. It looked straightforward enough and I completed that in reasonable time. Here's the rub -- I get stuck tuning with the barrel adjuster: at one point the chain shifts onto all gears and at certain points, after a few turns on the barrel adjuster, gets stuck - the shifter won't shift to high gear. So, I had to readjust the cable for some slack. And so it went in dejavu fashion!

    Then, shifting skips/jumps on the middle chainrings on the rear (and I thought I had this already straightened out.) I am not sure if the rear and front derailleurs are adjusted independent from one another or if they should be adjusted together as one unit.

    In any case, I begin to lose patience after a few tries, and took recess. I am considering trying again, although I am now more inclined to have a LBS do this for me.

    What do you think?
    As a follow up, I finally got the derailleurs to work properly. I guess it takes a number of tries to understand how the derailleurs really work: how the shifters, limit screws, cable tension and cage positioning interface, and how patience is truely a virtue in making these components work as a unit.

    My issue was really with the front derailleur wherein the chain jammed against the chainring when shifting up. I was using the shifter in conjunction with the barrel adjuster to position the cage out to set the cage gap from the largest chainring. What really worked for me was to pull on the cable to raise the cage to its proper position.

    I took the bike out for a test ride and the shifting was alright. At least, it was better than before I fooled around with it. I'm not done yet, though. Now that I have a working idea on how this thing is done, I'll do some more tuning when the weather gets better - some "fine" tuning, that is.

    And, thanks to Jake Pay also, for that link to the Parktool website.

  77. #377
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    So what's going on with that broken frame carlos?

  78. #378
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    Does anyone know?

  79. #379
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    Does the Ace suffer from brake jack?

  80. #380
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    Nice one for sale

    I dig this bike, but it has to go....I'll miss it. Hopefully one of you Sette fans will appreciate the build and take me up on it...

    http://classifieds.mtbr.com/showprod...?product=44394
    Check my pulse...

  81. #381
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    How many of you Sette Ace owners are experiencing rusting of the shock mount hardware and pivot bearings? This is my only complaint of the bike so far, after >1 year of use.
    Tire Design & Development Engineer. The opinions expressed in this forum are solely my own.

  82. #382
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    I put 554 miles on mine in less than a year and I am experiencing the rusting of the shock mount hardware. I'm not sure about the bearings though.

  83. #383
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    Rust???!!!?

    Quote Originally Posted by bholwell
    How many of you Sette Ace owners are experiencing rusting of the shock mount hardware and pivot bearings? This is my only complaint of the bike so far, after >1 year of use.
    Hmm a bad thing said about an ace!! thats almost a first.. Where is the rust coming from? maybe its the bolts, thats all i could figure would be rusting?

  84. #384
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    I've also got some rust on the shock hardware.. not enough to pull it apart and check the bearings.. but the bolts/washers are getting rusty.


    I just went out a took closer look, the rust I have is confined to theshock mount bolts at the top of the shock where it mounts to the top tube. It really looks like it the washers between the bolthead and the frame mount. I didn't notice any rust anywhere else. Some day I'll pull it apart and change out the washers... anyone remember the torque specs for those bolts?
    Last edited by abramsgunner; 01-16-2010 at 09:37 PM.

  85. #385
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    Okay Here is my review.. Just had the bike out for the second time, and have about 5 hours of riding. There is about 3-4 inches of snow on the ground on average where im riding.

    The Frame - Solid, even compared to my diamondback response hard tail. The frame didnt have any unwanted flex from what i could tell. The geometry is well suited to fast switchbacks and fast riding, as well as climbing. Actually climbed very well, with very little pedal bob. But after riding hard tail for so long, pedal bob is noticable, but only on steep uphills. It is very light, and it certainly shows its a quick bike. On the downhills, the bike leaves a bit to be desired. It does just fine on the downhill dont get me wrong, but seems to lack some stability. Im blaming this on the lightness of the frame/overall bike that im not used to, although it could be a number of things. I could chalk that up to my flat bar im using.

    Fork - - The RS Tora 302 air is fairly adjustable. It does just fine for my riding, and gets very stiff if i want it too, or as soft as i want it to. The rebound adjustment doesnt make a huge difference, although its slightly noticable. No unwanted noises or play in the fork.

    Rear Shock - RS Monarch 2.1 is suitable for xc riding. I weight 135 pounds, and with a 150PSI in it, it came very close to bottoming out off a 3 foot drop to flat, but it can handle another 100psi easy, so no problems there. The rebound adjustment on the shock is noticable and helpful. Its easy to fill with air as it has a swivel air tube. Overall i like the monarch, its very responsive to small bumps and still handles the big ones easy and smoothly.

    Brakes - Avid Juicy 3's and iv dont a little tuniing with them, cant seem to get them right. They are my first set of hydros, and i am impressed with the stopping power. They provide good lever feel and require little pressure to lock up (ecspecially in the snow). My complaint is they have little adjusment. The rotors are true but they still rub enough to slow the wheel in freespin. I guess i still gotta try to get that adjustment right. They never made any noise, even when i ran them hard on the downhills.

    Drivetrain - All Sram X.7 components with a truvativ firex crank. Much Much Much better than Sram X.4.. This setup is more than adequate for anything i do around my area. The triggers require less pressure to shift either way than the X.4, and adjust much easier and stay adjusted. No unwanted noises, quick shifts, and smooth peddling make me very happy and this drivetrain delivers.

    Wheels and tires -- XT hubs, Mavic wheels, And kenda krusher tires. The hubs and wheels are midrange and do their job, i dont know what else i can really say about them other that they look nice and have no problems 5 hours of riding. The tires arnt as wide as a typical 2.1 tire, but honestly they did better than i though they would. They had nice grip in the snow and did well uphill for being skinny. Still could have a little wider for better traction would be nice.

    Overall - Impressed with the bike, other than on the backside of the pivots, there is some grease coming from them, but it was just a little bit and i figure that is normal. Its a solid bike, and well worth the $999. Anyone who is on the fence with this bike, i say grow a pair and buy it, you wont be dissapointed the least. It climbs, jumps, and has extremley fast responsive handling.

  86. #386
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    It is sweet, and it could be yours....

    Here's one with a boatload of serious upgrades, ready to ride....

    http://classifieds.mtbr.com/showprod...=44394&cat=all

    I hate to let it go and take such a bath on it, but I'm riding an AM bike now, and cannot justify keeping it. If I was a racer, I would keep it and sell my Slayer.

    It is pretty well decked out and very light...
    Check my pulse...

  87. #387
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    Okay, Second review. Iv logged about 3.5 more hours on the bike. Almost 10 hours total. This time i rode a very rooty, bumpy, hilly trail.

    It was muddy as heck. Dropped the air pressure to around 115-120psi front and rear. Made it very plush in the rear and overall an amazing expierience. Still climbed like a goat on the slippery hills, even with the lower air pressure in the shock. A little more peddle bob, but comparing it to realative, not that much.

    Still shifting smooth, and havnt had to tune anything up yet.. Overall very very impressed still.

  88. #388
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    New velociraptor tires.

    Hello all,

    My new WTB velociraptor tires grip the ground good! The rear tire really bites into the ground. I have to confess that my velociraptors shut up my complaints about my Kenda krusher tires.

    Relatively new to mountain biking I continue to learn as I go. There are indeed trade offs in switching component parts. And, thing of it is, one really has to try to know. With the new tires my Sette Ace, although more sure footed on the trail, is not as fast as before. I might switch back to my Kenda krusher. Maybe this summer after the ground thaws out.

    700 + miles and still rides like new.

    Happy riding folks

  89. #389
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biker46
    Hello all,

    My new WTB velociraptor tires grip the ground good! The rear tire really bites into the ground. I have to confess that my velociraptors shut up my complaints about my Kenda krusher tires.

    Relatively new to mountain biking I continue to learn as I go. There are indeed trade offs in switching component parts. And, thing of it is, one really has to try to know. With the new tires my Sette Ace, although more sure footed on the trail, is not as fast as before. I might switch back to my Kenda krusher. Maybe this summer after the ground thaws out.

    700 + miles and still rides like new.

    Happy riding folks
    I actually find the kenda krushers to be quite adequate. Their about the best mix of low rolling resistance with grip at the same time that iv expierienced, and their still a low end tire. You sacrifice rolling resistance for better grip in adverse conditions usually. its always to have a good balance.

  90. #390
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    Need advice!

    Hi guys, I just came across this forum and it's amazing.. I am prepared to purchase a used Sette Ace that is fully set up with original specs as on Pricepoint. I was lightly used by a senior citizen and never saw bad weather and stayed on flat trails. It was purchase last year and is still “like new.” It's a size large and I am 6'1″ 187lbs. I am buying it for sure and wanted some feedback.

    I haven't ridden in many years and hoping to get back into it, and thought this was a great bike to start with. Pretty much I am about 12 years outdated with bike and components etc etc… Pretty much a newbie all over again.

    Is $575 a good deal?

    Please share your thoughts with me… This forum kicks @ss.

    Thanks everyone!

  91. #391
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    Whatever you do, do not buy this bike...send me the link as to where you found it and I will dispose of it properly ...I bought that frame and built it up 90% before jumping on the 29er bandwagon. I too came from a long layoff in biking. My last bike was a 1996 proflex (Stop laughing)....

    Only buy this bike if you really want to have fun again in the woods with your clothes on.

  92. #392
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    Haha (Proflex)... Can't help but laugh, sorry but the name alone (chuckle).

    So I am translating your message and it seems to mean it IS a good deal... Thanks However, I plan to ride my bike in the woods naked to be honest. I'll post some photos later Thanks for the tips though..

  93. #393
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    That price is 50% off the new price, so it is a very good deal if it truely is lightly ridden by a senior citizen.

  94. #394
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    Thanks Skeeno! I've done quite a bit of research and study on the bike etc... and seems to be a lot of positive things said. Just wanted to get other opinions and so far so good. I'm picking the bike up this week and can't wait to take it out. Already I know there will be a few things I want to upgrade but for now, I think it'll be just fine for me as a new beginner bike. Thanks again...

    Also any other tips or suggestions for the bikes set up would be great.

  95. #395
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    Hey all I just helped my cousin order up his first mountain bike Sette Ace he is 5'8 30 inch inseam I told him to go with the 16.5 in frame thought the 18.5 would be too tall of a stand over? if he is cramped on the bike he will need to send it back for the 18.5?

    After numerous attempts at finding a good bike within his budget this seemed like the best choice plus there are more happy riders on this form as well.

  96. #396
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcandy
    Thanks Skeeno! I've done quite a bit of research and study on the bike etc... and seems to be a lot of positive things said. Just wanted to get other opinions and so far so good. I'm picking the bike up this week and can't wait to take it out. Already I know there will be a few things I want to upgrade but for now, I think it'll be just fine for me as a new beginner bike. Thanks again...

    Also any other tips or suggestions for the bikes set up would be great.
    You will need to buy/borrow a shock specific pump that can pump the shock up to around 200psi. I run mine on the recommended 20% sag.

  97. #397
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    xcandy, you should be so lucky... I have heard of great bargain cars and old ladies, but senior citizens and mountain bikes is something else. Grab the darn thing after checking it out good. You never know about these senior citizens, I see them on pump tracks and jumping table tops all the time. They are not as lame as some people would have you believe.

    I got the complete bike from PP and replaced the handlebars on mine with a mid riser. Also changed the Shimano pedals with my paragon clipless only because I'm used to them. Changed the Kenda Krusher tires with WTB Velociraptors, only to find out that the Krushers ain't that bad. The trade off with the velociraptor's grip and sure footedness is resistance(It's a tad harder to keep cranking.) Added a computer to track my mileage and time. Hmmm, that's about it.

    If you do buy the bike, I suggest you give it a go before buying anything!

    Good luck!

  98. #398
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    Biker46! Awesome, thanks for the extra motivation. The parts you mentioned are all the things I also considered after reading all the forums and reviews. thanks again.. The person I am buying from is actually an avid daily rider but this was his back up bike and hardly used it as he was more into hybrids and road bikes for commuting.

    I am picking it up tomorrow and plan to look thoroughly and of course take it for a spin.

    Quick question. i am 6' with a 32" inseam.. do you think the (size large) will fit me well? According to the sizing on the PP site, it fits 5'11" and up.. What to you think? If not, I guess I will buy it anyway and maybe pass it on to my taller brother, unless someone else it interest.

  99. #399
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    bike size

    xcandy, i'm 5'.10" with a 32 inch inseam. I also have a large Giant HT with a standover of 30.9". It suits me well, too. When I first got my Ace, a midsize, I thought it small until I got used to it.

    I ride both bikes interchangeably and, thing of it is, my Ace always feel a little small at the beginning of each ride, but after I get going it feels just right. Large should suit you just fine. Besides, your inseam may actually be more than 32". Anyway you'll soon find out how well it fits when you take it for a spin.

    Remember, to set the shocks and saddle before your ride out.

    Have fun!

  100. #400
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    Picked up the bike today. He wasn't kidding when he said like new. Not a single scratch on it and I actually had to air up the shock (fork and rear) cause it seemed to be sitting for a while. he was a pretty tall guy at around 6'3" so the bike was set up for his style of flat riding. I adjusted the handle bars and components, saddle, bought a pump and air up the shocks when I got home and took it for a ride. man oh man... It felt great.

    At first I thought it seemed a bit big but after adjusting the bars to where they should be (for me) and saddle, it's a near perfect fit. Again, I haven't ridden in many years so there is a lot for me to learn and eventually fine tune.

    It hink the first thing to go are the stem and handle bars. I'd like a lower angle.

    Only thing was the the rear wheel wasn't to spec. Instead of a Mavic MX 719, it was a Mavic XM 717 with XT hub... Looks like it was replaced cause even the cassette has no sign of dirt or anything, straight from the box even...

    What do you guys think? Did I still make the right choice on this bargain?

    Also, thanks to all of you who gave your tips and suggestions. for sure I am going to be a regular fan of this forum. It's all so helpfull.

    Thanks,
    xcandy

    p.s. I'll post some photos soon of the bike in the condition when I received it.

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