Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    212

    Cool-blue Rhythm Anyone else notice the Sette Flite in the RockShox videos?

    For example, here:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1EUNbttowg

    or here:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJooF...eature=related

    and all the other videos from that series.

    Makes me proud they chose *my* bike out of all the possibilities.

  2. #2
    Cuánto pesa?
    Reputation: Jake Pay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    7,880
    Quote Originally Posted by derailin_palin
    For example, here:

    or here:

    and all the other videos from that series.
    Makes me proud they chose *my* bike out of all the possibilities.


    Good stuff to know and learn nice to see Setté being used in the videos

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dremer03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    3,656
    Looks like a Flite, but it has either had the decals removed or they bought it without. Either way just seeing the hack half leads me to believe it is at least the same frame as the Flite, but not branded.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    212
    I have one of these unmarked "prototype" Flites. Sette was not the only company to sell this exact frame, there was another company that marketed them as well. Buffalo cycles or something like that. I'll post it if I find it.

    In those SRAM videos and I believe on Sette's frames, the bracket for the lower shock mount has straight lines and a right angle bend. On my frame the bracket has a lower profile and has a curved bend. See below:




    EDIT: OK, found it. Harvey Cycles sells exactly the same frame. Well, not exactly, but close. The downtube has a different shape.
    http://www.harveycycles.com/PNF.html
    Last edited by derailin_palin; 12-19-2009 at 02:42 PM.

  5. #5
    ~Disc~Golf~
    Reputation: highdelll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    17,342
    Quote Originally Posted by derailin_palin
    In those SRAM videos and I believe on Sette's frames, the bracket for the lower shock mount has straight lines and a right angle bend. On my frame the bracket has a lower profile and has a curved bend.
    curved bracket/lower profile
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,142
    So, just curious, what's the general consensous these days? would the sette be better,or how would it be different, with a horst link. Maybe it's a bit of a trollish question, but i have an azonic saber, which has the horst link but is otherwise very similar in layout,more heavily gusseted ,leaning a bit more towards AM/freeride, but similar enough to be compared.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    212
    Quote Originally Posted by herbn
    So, just curious, what's the general consensous these days? would the sette be better,or how would it be different, with a horst link. Maybe it's a bit of a trollish question, but i have an azonic saber, which has the horst link but is otherwise very similar in layout,more heavily gusseted ,leaning a bit more towards AM/freeride, but similar enough to be compared.
    That's a good question. I've often wondered how the exact same bike would ride with a Horst link instead of a faux bar. I have read that it doesn't make much of a difference, and I have never been on a Horst link bike except a quick parking lot test, so I can't really compare the two. I think the main advantage of Horst is less brake jack. In a faux bar design the rear wheel has the same wheel path as a single pivot bike, and the only thing that's different is the leverage ratio curve. The company that makes the bikes, Astro Engineering of Taiwan, has a version of the Sette frame with a Horst link. Perhaps Sette/Pricepoint will sell those at one point?

    If someone has a copy of Linkage, they could draw up both frames and plot the wheel path and leverage ratio for comparison.
    Last edited by derailin_palin; 12-19-2009 at 09:26 PM.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dictatorsaurus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,539
    What is the Flite suspension design called?

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    212
    Quote Originally Posted by Dictatorsaurus
    What is the Flite suspension design called?
    It's a four-bar design with a seatstay pivot, called "faux bar" to distinguish it from the Horst link with its chainstay pivot. The two linkages are exactly the same, but in the faux bar the "output crank" (bar that wheel is attached to) is the same as the "input" crank (chainstays), so it works very similar to a single pivot.

  10. #10
    NedwannaB
    Reputation: JMac47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    8,609

    Serious, really?

    Quote Originally Posted by derailin_palin
    That's a good question. I think the main advantage of Horst is less brake jack. In a faux bar design the rear wheel has the same wheel path as a single pivot bike
    I hear this all the time. brake jack, Brake Jack BRAKE JACK! I'm sure in the race scene it matters, but in recreation riding, which most of us do, why does this come up as a negative so often?? What did we do for sooo long without the fancy wheeel paths. I don't see SC changing the SL/Heckler models much thru out the years.

    So, I have question, can't most of the infamous brake jack syndrom be simply corrected by EFFECTIVE BRAKING?? Just say'n.

    Edit: Does anyone suffer with this problem on their Flite???
    Wait,who did he tell you that?....

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    212
    Yea, it's all hype really. Everyone should ride a steel rigid or they're wussies.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dictatorsaurus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,539
    Quote Originally Posted by derailin_palin
    It's a four-bar design with a seatstay pivot, called "faux bar" to distinguish it from the Horst link with its chainstay pivot. The two linkages are exactly the same, but in the faux bar the "output crank" (bar that wheel is attached to) is the same as the "input" crank (chainstays), so it works very similar to a single pivot.
    At the end of the day very few of us are racing with these bikes. With all the different suspension types, do they really make that big of a difference for us recreational riders?

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    212
    If you take your recreation seriously, it might. For example, you might not be a racer, but you enjoy going down fast and climbing efficiently. As for the specifics of horst vs faux bar, I've haven't put a horst bike through its paces sufficiently to give an opinion on that.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dictatorsaurus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,539
    Quote Originally Posted by derailin_palin
    If you take your recreation seriously, it might. For example, you might not be a racer, but you enjoy going down fast and climbing efficiently. As for the specifics of horst vs faux bar, I've haven't put a horst bike through its paces sufficiently to give an opinion on that.
    I'd really like to know the difference on how they both work and if the Horst is really any better.

    Aside from doing a search on the forum, do you have any good links comparing both?

  15. #15
    NedwannaB
    Reputation: JMac47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    8,609

    Bump....

    [QUOTE=JMac47]brake jack Brake Jack BRAKE JACK!

    Edit: Does anyone suffer with this problem on their Flite???[/QUOTE]
    Wait,who did he tell you that?....

  16. #16
    ~Disc~Golf~
    Reputation: highdelll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    17,342
    [QUOTE=JMac47]
    Quote Originally Posted by JMac47
    brake jack Brake Jack BRAKE JACK!

    Edit: Does anyone suffer with this problem on their Flite???[/QUOTE]
    Sometimes on small bump chatter .
    The platform contributes a bit too I think.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    212
    Personally I do notice the brake jack, but it's not a big deal. Like I said, I haven't ridden a horst bike, so I don't know what I am missing (except theoretically).

    This link has a good explanation of the different suspension designs.
    http://users.actrix.co.nz/dougal.ellen//frameset.html

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,142
    when i rode a mtn cycle san andreas as a xc bike and eventually converted it into a dh bike,it was pretty much the rule to be really good with using the front brake and the back suspension was set up kind of soft so a little rear brake wouldn't lock things up front sprockets were 44 or 46 teeth so they wouldn't feed into the back suspension as much.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •