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  1. #1
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    Questions about the Scott Scale 29er Carbon

    My Scott dealer quoted me $1500 for the Scale 29 Pro frame and $1800 for the Scale RC frame. But they weren't really sure about the differences between these two frames, except that the more expensive version (I forget what its called, is it the RC version?) has the HMX-NET carbon fiber, which supposedly stiffer. Is this the only difference? Is there a weight difference? The Scott website says that the Pro version also boasts the 949gram frame weight. $300 isn't much of a price difference, but I'd like to know more.

  2. #2
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    Not sure what Scott website you are on, maybe a different country, but they list the RC at 949 g and the Pro at 1150 g on the Canadian/American site, and from what I have seen the quoted difference holds true.

    Also, the RC comes with a Ritchey WCS Carbon seatpost (just over 200g), whereas the Pro with an alloy Scott seatpost (somewhere above 300 g). At the quoted prices I would definitely go for the RC for the weight savings.

  3. #3
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    yeah what he said, and the WCS seatpost isn't too bad at, 215 grams, light enough for me to keep, the one on the pro isn't. They should have included a superlogic post on the RC instead though. But for that scott would have to give up their stupidly large seat tube diameter and 34.9 humongo seat post standard.

  4. #4
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    Thanks, I think the more expensive frameset is worth it for the weight savings and I guess for the supposed stiffness. That seatpost is way too thick, they've engineered compliance into the stays but still there is no reason for such a thick post.

    How durable is this frameset over the long run? Is Scott's warranty service known to be customer friendly? The shop I talked to said they haven't had any issues with cracked frames.

    Also, are the colors for the frameset the same as the RC and Pro (yellow/black and black/white?)?

  5. #5
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    In addition to the questions I posted above, can anyone comment on how they like the 69.5 head tube angle? It is quite slack, which makes me a bit wary as this bike needs to climb with the best of hardtails.

  6. #6
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    It's 69.5, a scale 26 er has a HA of 70 and that frame has one heck of a race pedigree. I'm sure you will do fine with the .5 degree slacker, and that will not be your limiting factor on climbs, especially with the increased traction the 29er gives you.

    Ya it may be a little slower steering than some other bikes, but it's no slouch and you should adapt quickly. No problem racing it in the canada cup and some of the pro xct series in US for me...

  7. #7
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    The difference that has been brought up in a different thread is that the pro rides a little softer. Cannot testify to that since I have only ridden the pro/ expert frame and not the RC.

    For HA, I personally am not sold on it. If however, you read the magazine reviews, those reviewers said they loved the slack angle. Maybe it's cause I am in the Northeast? Maybe it's my riding style? (I race cat 1) Anyways, it has taken me very long to get used to the bike and am getting more comfortable w/ it but the slack HA puts, for my liking, the frt tire out too far forwards, which gives the the front end a tendency to wash out at times. It's ironic cause the bike has a very small wheelbase, but to me the bike feels very large (I ride a medium). I recently compared a 9Air9, which though on paper had a longer wheelbase, felt much quicker and nimbler. I go on and on and on about trying to get used to this bike in my blog if you want more info! I am going to be ordering a new 29er HT soon w/ a steeper HA (most likely a Lynskey) so that I can really compare both bikes.
    Before you buy anything online, send Bob at bikerbob.com an email! Best online retailer!

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  8. #8
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    This is funny that you mention a Lynskey, I actually ride a Lynskey Ridgeline 29er HT which I bought just a few months ago. I really like the Lynskey, you can read my full review on mtbr reviews for this bike. But I'm getting more into racing and was toying with the idea of getting a super light race bike like the Scale, and either keeping the Lynskey as a second bike for more rugged pursuits, or selling it if I really liked the Scale. I'm more concerned with the slack angle for climbing, the trails here in Utah are either steep climbs or equally steep descents. There isn't a lot of technical tight cornering, and races are really won on how fast you get up. I'm concerned that the slack angle puts the weight of the bike farther back, causing the front to wander and wheelie on climbs, leading you off-trail. Obviously it would be an asset on steep descents, however.

  9. #9
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    If you are in Utah, I'll loan you my RC for a ride or two. Well, at least when we get some drier trails. I've raced mine all through last summer and the slack angle never bothered me at all. I did notice it when I first got the bike but I quickly adapted. If your front end is washing out, you need to position yourself differently on the bike. I really liked the stability of the bike on long endurance races.

  10. #10
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    ^^ That is a pretty good endorsement. Could you be a bit more specific though, what took getting used to, and how did you adapt in terms of body position, etc?

  11. #11
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    Not the best written piece ever, but this pretty much sums up why I want something different to the Scale:

    Another Mountain Biker...: Ride x+1

    Now that being said, I do enjoy the scale's stableness and dampening, it's just not a bike I feel I can throw around tight trails.
    Last edited by bellullabob; 01-30-2012 at 12:02 PM. Reason: cn't speel fur shat!
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  12. #12
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    First thing I noticed was the sweep of the stock handlebar, very different from what I was used to. I ended up liking it as it is a more natural position for my wrists. The front wheel does get light on the climbs but that is also because of the short chainstays. It really tucks the back wheel in under the rider and the front end wants to loft. You just have to move your body forward. I can't really describe how I adapted to the slacker angle, I just found how the bike likes to be ridden. I haven't found it limiting at all. You live in Utah so you are aware how tight some of our higher alpine singletrack can be. I don't feel limited at all. You get the added benefit of nice stability at speed. During the PCP2P I was wasted and the steering was forgiving. Personally I think it is far easier to learn to make a slack bike steer fast than it is to be very tired and make a twitchy bike take it easy on you. The offer stands, even if you just want to take it for a spin on the local roads and flick it around. Send me a PM if you are interested. Bring your Lynskey, we'll swap for the day.

  13. #13
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    I just brought a scott scale pro last week and so far, other that just getting used to going from a 26er to a 29er, I haven't noticed any difference in the angle. It's a sweet ride.

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