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  1. #1
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    High end parts are they really worth it?

    I have found that people like to pay for things that aren't really needed. The fact is that most of the stuff they put on bikes works fine and the companies are making you think that all of the components make the ride better. You know what makes the ride better? Riding. The reality is that the difference in bikes is minimal. I can see the difference in shocks to some degree but is it really worth $400 or $800 more. I say no. Opinions?
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  2. #2
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    Wheels and forks and saddles yes, everything else, not so much.

    I have uber high end stuff on my bike because I work in the industry.

  3. #3
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    depends on the components you have,i will agree that "upgrading" from xt to xtr would be a waste of money for most people but on many budget bikes the manufacturer has saved money by putting rely cheap parts on it and in those cases the difference in performance,reliability and weight can be significant.
    also for some people,if buying that new part makes them like their bike more and makes them want to ride more then it is definitely worth it.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by pumaking View Post
    Wheels and forks and saddles yes, everything else, not so much.

    I have uber high end stuff on my bike because I work in the industry.
    I agree. Thanks for the input.
    See Ya at the bottom!!!!

  5. #5
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by dsintov View Post
    depends on the components you have,i will agree that "upgrading" from xt to xtr would be a waste of money for most people but on many budget bikes the manufacturer has saved money by putting rely cheap parts on it and in those cases the difference in performance,reliability and weight can be significant.
    also for some people,if buying that new part makes them like their bike more and makes them want to ride more then it is definitely worth it.
    I understand what you are saying but you would have to agree that shimano Alivio to XTR really have very little difference. But it is true if you put that new swag on the bike it sure does make you love it more. Its kinda like when you were a kid and got new shoes and you told everyone look how much faster I can run. LOL
    See Ya at the bottom!!!!

  6. #6
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    So with that in mind, would it be better to buy a good frame and build from the ground up with the components you want? I have heard many people say that this way would be too expensive. Won't it be more expensive changing all the components on a complete bike you already purchased, especially if the parts are not that significantly better?

  7. #7
    DaFaJa
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    Quote Originally Posted by pumaking View Post
    Wheels and forks and saddles yes, everything else, not so much.
    Steel Frame?
    2012 Trek Superfly 100 Carbon/ xx1 / xo type2
    Tampa FL USA

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by iamspartacus View Post
    So with that in mind, would it be better to buy a good frame and build from the ground up with the components you want? I have heard many people say that this way would be too expensive. Won't it be more expensive changing all the components on a complete bike you already purchased, especially if the parts are not that significantly better?
    It is expensive because the parts cost more when sold individually and unless you are a bike mechanic you would have to pay someone to build it. I would and did go with a solid company and lower end parts. I feel like the if the parts fail I will replace them with midgrade but until then I get a good frame. Otherwise I saved a lot of money and get to have fun without being broke. I bought a Scott Spark 29 Comp. All the geometry of the more expensive bikes and still an all shimano drivetrain, rock shox front fork, and good tires and rims overall a full suspension 29er that isn't a piece of crap for less than $2k.
    See Ya at the bottom!!!!

  9. #9
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    I think everyone is different. I think people after a while figure out what they think is more important to upgrade and what should be middle of the road quality.

    I'm sorta middle of the road when it comes to brakes and drivetrain (currently on XT crankset and looking for upgrade to XT for shifters and rear der). For wheels and hubs, I try to go on the more expensive side just because that's where a lot of weight savings come from.

    Suspension is where I tend to put some money. Currently I'm eyeing a Fox DHX Air 7.5x2 to replace my Equalizer (just because you never know when it'll break down) and even then, I'll be sending that DHX to Craig at Avalanche to have him tune it to the bike. I have a Fox Van 36 RC2 in front and as soon as Craig has the new cartridges built for that, I'll be going that route.
    -2000 Giant DH Team
    -2003 Balfa BB7
    -2004 Nicolai Nuclean ST
    *DH riding hiatus*
    -2011 Intense M9

  10. #10
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    I think you made a topic in a wrong sub forum. This is a room for Scott user but that is alright.

    I'm agree with your opinion that you have said "what makes the ride better? riding" is completely true and acceptable. By riding it your performance will be advanced.

    I use Aspect 40 which is the lower end series of Scott and in my point of view it needs to be upgraded. I don't mean to say that its part is not good either but if you want to do some intense XC rides with those stock parts on it someday it will be broken earlier rather than you upgrading them to the higher series. So far I made a few touch on it. I've changed its crankset with Alivio (not the high end though) octalink because the square tapper couldn't transfer the power effectively. I have a few plans for upgrading it again while waiting for some money.

    Do some upgrade accurately.

  11. #11
    gravity fighter
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    Well to bring this back around to Scott...

    I just got myself a Scale 29er comp with the "super crappy" Suntour fork with the plan to upgrade to a Recon/Reba ASAP.
    Well I took my first good ride and it performed great on my trails. There was never a moment where I felt myself wishing for better suspension. I just enjoyed the ride.
    It helped that my riding buddy with the nicer spec'ed bike was having a tough time keeping up with me
    I know the new bike honeymoon will end soon enough, but I'm going to try to avoid the upgrade bug as long as possible.
    Spending less time on Mtn Bike forums reading about upgrades would probably help!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikecito View Post
    Spending less time on Mtn Bike forums reading about upgrades would probably help!
    I spend much time here and luckily I'm not get tempted.

  13. #13
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    I think the best value for money for most components would be the "just below highest end". In the case of a rear derailer I think the price difference between XT and XTR is too big to justify for most people, including myself (and I have SRAM).

    To say that there is not a lot of difference between XTR and Alivio depends on what you use it for. Just like a small Toyota is not much different compared to a Ferrari when stuck in a traffic jam. I believe that if you do regular mountain biking whether or not in competition, you'd have more value for money buying a SLX/XT over an Alivio. If you spend most of your time on roads then sure the Alivio will be fine.

    There's not only the performance difference, there's also a safety related aspect. There was a post somewhere about a guy who's Alivio broke off 2 times iirc. Have this happen on the wrong moment and it could lead to a serious fall. You could say the same about low end brakes that stop braking in muddy conditions, etc...

  14. #14
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    The biggest difference between high and low end components is their weight, making something lighter almost always requires more engineering, better materials, and more cost. And no way I believe Alivio controls/derailleurs operate with the same efficiency/durability, and tactile feel that XTR does.
    Still most people have some sort of budget constraints so I think in general buy the best frame you can afford even if it has lower end components to begin with. You can change stuff out as it wears out or your wallet allows. Using Scott bikes as an example, I'd rather have the cheapest level of carbon framed bike with lesser components, than the top of the line alloy frame. That said, I think their alloy Scale frames are still upgrade worthy, do not have any direct experience with alloy Sparks.

  15. #15
    Big Boy
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    slx, mid level suspension (reba, rp2), and a nice set of wheels is all I need!!
    -It's time to shred some mild to moderate gnar!!

  16. #16
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    I can feel the difference a couple pounds makes. It takes a lot of expensive, light parts to get a 7" bike with big tires, 2 chainrings, and dropper post under 30lbs. The result however is a lot of fun to ride and a formidable enduro race mount.
    Keep the Country country.

  17. #17
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    I think a lot of people are forgetting about durability. I used a XTR rear derailleur on my cross bike for almost 10 years before it stopped working. The rest of the bike is Ultegra. It's all 12 years old and still works great. The only thing I've replaced is the cassette and chains.

    My mtn bike is mostly XT. The shifters and hubs are 15 years old and they still work.

  18. #18
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    Well, I am still a newby but here is my opinion so far. I purchased a Scott Aspect as a first bike. I took it to N. Ga for some MTBiking and the brakes were $H!t. As the bike was $450, it would cost another $450 in wheels and brakes to get new disc brakes. So, I just traded my bike in on a Scott Genius.

    Brakes: There is a huge difference in hydr disc brakes over mechanical wheel brakes. The money is worth it. Now, I don't know if there is enough difference in hydr brakes to justify buying a "better hydro brake.

    Front Supension: The Fox forks are so much better than the Suntour. Yes, it is worth the extra money for that upgrade. I rode motorcross bikes and still ride street bikes. Suspension is key to a confident ride. The same holds true to bikes, IMO.

    The derailers seem similar, the Deore does seem nicer than the Altus. Not sure how much better in terms of money though.

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