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Thread: vpf owners

  1. #1
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    vpf owners

    how many of you guys climb with your bike? im in a sit where i need to only keep one bike, so i need to sell the v10 and bullit. i have a 150mm 66 and an 06 888rc2x. i think ill keep thoes two and swap out depending on the ride. also, i have a shorter rear shock i could slap on for am rides. this sound like a feaseble plan? how well do these things climb? thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by SJensen
    how many of you guys climb with your bike? im in a sit where i need to only keep one bike, so i need to sell the v10 and bullit. i have a 150mm 66 and an 06 888rc2x. i think ill keep thoes two and swap out depending on the ride. also, i have a shorter rear shock i could slap on for am rides. this sound like a feaseble plan? how well do these things climb? thanks

    I'll start saying with the statment "Jack of all trades master of none" - I think this describes bikes that try and DH one day, trail the next. I had a VP Free and it is a great FR / DH bike. Can it pedal up a hill yes. What it boils down to is where & who you ride with ? If you VP Free AM with riders that are also on big bikes then the climbing paces will be tollerable. On the other hand if you ride w/ a group of 4/5/6" travel bikes that Free is gonna be a chore to move @ pace. I think the Bullit is more versitile, the Free is more on the FR/DH spectrum. The Nomad is more on the trail side.

  3. #3
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    Exactly why I own a Nomad and a VP-Free. Nomad set up light for aggressive trail riding and the VPF for DH/FR activities. I have friends who have VP-Free's with single crown forks, but it's not the same as having a 888 or Fox-40 up front when it comes to the big drops. I still climb with the 42 lb. Free, but at a snail's pace.

    On the other hand....Guess if I were to downsize to just one bike, I'd go with a "lightened-up" VP-Free with single crown fork. I say that because I've owned Bullits for years prior to VPP.
    "Hesitation is the Mother of Failure!"

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  4. #4
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    I'm only able to have one bike and the VP is my do-it-all bike. I have it built up as a trail/freeride build (37.25 lbs.). It works great. It climbs great and I have no problems doing long steep climbs on it. I'm very impressed with the climbing ability of this bike. Some people say that it doesn't climb very well, but it depends on how the bike is setup. Setup as a trail/freeride bike makes it perfect for everything except for full on downhill. Only thing I'm considering doing is either running a shorter shock on the rear or swapping out the van 36 for a marz 66 up front. I don't live where it warrants having a burley downhill setup. If I did, I'd buy a DC fork and downhill wheelset for the lift assisted days and just swap em out on those days. Very versatile bike IMO.

  5. #5
    Some Assembly Required
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    I ride my VP Free up & down. 45lbs, 11-34 SRAM cassette, Saint cranks w/26-36 rings.
    2.7 Nevegals ft/bk. 06 66sl & a Cane Creak Double Barrel. I love this bike. I do sitback and climb on the longer stuff and you do need the leg for it, but any climbing is well worth it when you start dh. I'm in western NC & I ride Wilson's Creek, so any dh is gonna require a climb out to the next dh. I'd keep the VP Free & a coupl'a forks and yer set.
    "Why are you willing to take so much & leave others in need...just because you can?"

  6. #6
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    I climb my Free, it's 33 lbs. with a 36 RC2, I drop it to 4" for steep climbs which steepens the head/seat angles to 69 degrees and I can climb the steepest roads in the middle (big) ring. I'm sure extreme DH and really big drops would be better with a DC fork, but I don't have any lifts too close and I don't drop anything big enough to need a DC fork. So, Perfect for Me.

  7. #7
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    all mountain free

    I just swapped out my double crown fork for the Totem 2 Step and couldn't be happier. It climbs but can still tackle everything that I have the skill and/or desire for. Although I currently run a single ring with E13 guide, I will be going back to a 2 ring setup (granny/front derailleur) with the 2 ring E13 guide. I haven't weighed my current setup, but its probably in the range of 39 pounds, which hurts on the climbs, but I can still climb, although I am at the back of the pack.

    Having said all that, IMO the true all-mountain setup would be a Nomad...

  8. #8
    All Mt, DH
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    After running my Free with a 888 for a few years I decided to go for the 66rc2x fork 180mm. It does everything my 888 did (had the 170mm 888 version) but the 66 is lighter / more manuverable and has better adjustments. I found I could go over stuff (climb) better mainly due to little less weight. I did run a Van 36 for a bit, but was a little to short (made the bike HA steep IMO). MIne weighs around 39lbs and climbs ok, I just wouldnt want to do all day epics on the Free (especially in summer)
    2007 Blur 4x
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