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  1. #1
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    ... and if we just ... Sorry Intense 6.6 Nomad beats them all

    according to one german magazine(Mountainbike Magazin 02/2006)

    .

    Tested Bike: SCB Nomad

    Other Bikes Tested:
    Cannondale Prophet MX
    Giant Reign 2
    Intense 6.6
    Kona Coil Air
    Morewood Shova ST
    Orange Patriot 66
    Rocky Mountain Slayer 90
    Scott Ransom LTD
    Specialized Enduro S-Works
    Trek Remedy 66

    Result: Over all Winner of the Test



    Written words:

    How does test winner look like? They are brilliant in every field: good looking, well machined, superb designed. Stiffness coming out of hydroformed alloy sheets and huge bearings, changeable dropout that doesn´t crack at the first hit, a well anodized frame (150 EUR upcharge) that doesn´t get scratchy after the first lap. And the best of all: riding skills are absolutely great. The guys at Santa Cruz know about steering geometries, the Nomad corners with nonchalance through angular and rocky trails – without feeling sluggish. Woop, woop directions are changed, perfect the change from corner to corner. One reason is the very centered position of the rider while sitting or standing. Sitting with high mounted saddle, standing with the saddle droped down very far - and with a big extra of space because of the down shaped top tube.
    The rear triangle? Quite long, ultra-effective in acceleration, excellent in work, in spite of the relatively smaller travel (measured 155m and with that 10mm below manufacturers declaration). Only if the rider wants to lift the front wheel the Nomad reacts a little bit lazier and not as smooth as the Intense. Ergo: a real funbike and a test winner, that is unfortunately only available as a frame kit. (outside u.s. and canada only)



    Conclusion: Really hard to find any drawback at the Nomad. If there is one, then at most that this bike is a custom one and all possible mistakes in building up this beauty have to be relied to the customer. (outside u.s. and canada only)



    What did they measure:
    Weight: 14,3kg bike / 3,3 kg frame
    Top tube: 595mm
    Seat tube: 480mm
    Steering tube: 130mm
    Wheelbase. 1145mm
    bb-height: 350mm
    seat angle: 70,4
    steering angle: 67,5


    SG-Index: it is a kind of “stiffness of the bb and front triangle to frameweight” ratio that is defined by the magazine and done with every bike:

    SG-Index: 63,4 – stiffest-to-lightest bike in test!

    Bike weight: 14,33kg
    Frame weight:3310gr
    Fork weight: 2440gr
    Wheels complete: 4750gr
    Komponents: 3830gr

  2. #2
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    With all the nice comments people have on this bike it's not surprising. They have tested it against a nice lineup but I would just have liked to see the Moment or the 6-pack in there because aside from the 6.6, none other comes from a small frame builder.

    Their statement about the travel being 155mm (6.1") is a bit of a surprise and dissapointment for me. Any owners of the Nomad who have measured their travel yet?

  3. #3
    STS
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    This is the SG-test result
    And the second one is the Scott Ransom, but with 166m of real travel in the full travel mode (110 in the short travel)
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    TNC
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    Rube Goldberg method.

    Since I was pulling the shock off my Nomad for another post here, I decided to try two methods of measuring rear wheel travel. I usually use a method where you set the bike up in a good stand...mine is a Park shop model mounted in a concrete base...and pull the shock. Then use a hydraulic jack to jack the wheel up and down and measure at different points to mimic an installed shock at full extension and full compression...2.5" in the Nomad's case. I use the center of the axle as a reference point. This works well on a simple single pivot. I'm not an engineer and wasn't sure if the type of linkage on this VPP design moves a little differently if a shock is not in place when moving the rear wheel. Just to remove that possibility, I installed an 8.5 X 2.5 Fox RC that had been on one of my Bullits. With the spring removed I could compress the RC up to where it starts to mash the bottomout bumper. I'm still leary of compressing these stable platform IFP shocks without a spring or without air in the main chamber because of all the hoopla of caution involved with maintaining a minimum level of psi in the SPV or chamber. There's no such concern with the RC.

    Anyway, after rigging everything up, I kept winding up with 6.375" of travel...or 6 & 3/8 inches U.S. My pic shows a ratchet strap attached to a point in the ceiling, but after using this method, I decided to remove the possibility of the strap also raising the bike while trying to compress this RC bottomout bumper. I later attached the strap to the top of the seatpost to pull the tire into the frame. I still got 6.375" at the axle, but I could tell I didn't really have the RC's bottomout bumper compressed fully, as I got a little nervous trying to crank in pressure on the ratchet strap on my brand new bike...LOL!

    I don't know how scientific all this is, but that's what I came up with. It appears to me that there will be 6.5" of travel fairly easily when the topout bumper gets compressed. And if you have a DHX-Air, they easily get all 2.5" of the shock stroke, as you can easily knock the travel o-ring off while you're trying to set up this shock. If anyone else comes up with something similar or different, please share it with us, and how you got your measurements.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
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    Could you tell us what shock and fork were on the Nomad and 6.6 in that test. Hopefully the same since the shock and fork really have the most influence on bike feel. Thanks.

  6. #6
    Redwood Dancer
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    Interesting... thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    Since I was pulling the shock off my Nomad for another post here, I decided to try two methods of measuring rear wheel travel. I usually use a method where you set the bike up in a good stand...mine is a Park shop model mounted in a concrete base...and pull the shock. Then use a hydraulic jack to jack the wheel up and down and measure at different points to mimic an installed shock at full extension and full compression...2.5" in the Nomad's case. I use the center of the axle as a reference point. This works well on a simple single pivot. I'm not an engineer and wasn't sure if the type of linkage on this VPP design moves a little differently if a shock is not in place when moving the rear wheel. Just to remove that possibility, I installed an 8.5 X 2.5 Fox RC that had been on one of my Bullits. With the spring removed I could compress the RC up to where it starts to mash the bottomout bumper. I'm still leary of compressing these stable platform IFP shocks without a spring or without air in the main chamber because of all the hoopla of caution involved with maintaining a minimum level of psi in the SPV or chamber. There's no such concern with the RC.

    Anyway, after rigging everything up, I kept winding up with 6.375" of travel...or 6 & 3/8 inches U.S. My pic shows a ratchet strap attached to a point in the ceiling, but after using this method, I decided to remove the possibility of the strap also raising the bike while trying to compress this RC bottomout bumper. I later attached the strap to the top of the seatpost to pull the tire into the frame. I still got 6.375" at the axle, but I could tell I didn't really have the RC's bottomout bumper compressed fully, as I got a little nervous trying to crank in pressure on the ratchet strap on my brand new bike...LOL!

    I don't know how scientific all this is, but that's what I came up with. It appears to me that there will be 6.5" of travel fairly easily when the topout bumper gets compressed. And if you have a DHX-Air, they easily get all 2.5" of the shock stroke, as you can easily knock the travel o-ring off while you're trying to set up this shock. If anyone else comes up with something similar or different, please share it with us, and how you got your measurements.
    Good to see somebody takes their specs seriously. Nice work
    RAIL OR F*!%#!*^G BAIL

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by daisycutter
    according to one german magazine(Mountainbike Magazin 02/2006)

    .

    Tested Bike: SCB Nomad

    Other Bikes Tested:
    Cannondale Prophet MX
    Giant Reign 2
    Intense 6.6
    Kona Coil Air
    Morewood Shova ST
    Orange Patriot 66
    Rocky Mountain Slayer 90
    Scott Ransom LTD
    Specialized Enduro S-Works
    Trek Remedy 66

    Result: Over all Winner of the Test



    Written words:

    How does test winner look like? They are brilliant in every field: good looking, well machined, superb designed. Stiffness coming out of hydroformed alloy sheets and huge bearings, changeable dropout that doesn´t crack at the first hit, a well anodized frame (150 EUR upcharge) that doesn´t get scratchy after the first lap. And the best of all: riding skills are absolutely great. The guys at Santa Cruz know about steering geometries, the Nomad corners with nonchalance through angular and rocky trails – without feeling sluggish. Woop, woop directions are changed, perfect the change from corner to corner. One reason is the very centered position of the rider while sitting or standing. Sitting with high mounted saddle, standing with the saddle droped down very far - and with a big extra of space because of the down shaped top tube.
    The rear triangle? Quite long, ultra-effective in acceleration, excellent in work, in spite of the relatively smaller travel (measured 155m and with that 10mm below manufacturers declaration). Only if the rider wants to lift the front wheel the Nomad reacts a little bit lazier and not as smooth as the Intense. Ergo: a real funbike and a test winner, that is unfortunately only available as a frame kit. (outside u.s. and canada only)



    Conclusion: Really hard to find any drawback at the Nomad. If there is one, then at most that this bike is a custom one and all possible mistakes in building up this beauty have to be relied to the customer. (outside u.s. and canada only)



    What did they measure:
    Weight: 14,3kg bike / 3,3 kg frame
    Top tube: 595mm
    Seat tube: 480mm
    Steering tube: 130mm
    Wheelbase. 1145mm
    bb-height: 350mm
    seat angle: 70,4
    steering angle: 67,5


    SG-Index: it is a kind of “stiffness of the bb and front triangle to frameweight” ratio that is defined by the magazine and done with every bike:

    SG-Index: 63,4 – stiffest-to-lightest bike in test!

    Bike weight: 14,33kg
    Frame weight:3310gr
    Fork weight: 2440gr
    Wheels complete: 4750gr
    Komponents: 3830gr
    Are you just comparing the Nomad to the Intense because they are both VPP? Or did you go to each of the brands forums and make the same claim Sorry_________ but....Nomad beats...?

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