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  1. #1
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    SC Superlight vs Titus Carbon X

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    I'm looking for a general XC bike that is a few pounds, well about 6, lighter than my Trail/AM bike. I don't plan to race this bike but there is a slim chance I might. Been riding for a few years and have a decent skill level built up. I'm 5'8 and about 200lb with the extra winter 15lb that will soon again go away.

    I've owned an FSR and have a single pivot but as they say, everyone builds their bikes different so the same suspension designs don't all ride the same. Price diff is about $500.

    No way I'm gonna get to test the Titus so has anyone ridden both of these bikes and care to share your opinion?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    JDO
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    Well, the first thing that comes to my mind is that Titus is a dead company. Buying a bike from a company with no clear future is kind of a risky investment.

  3. #3
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    On-one claimed to be committed to supporting all Titus frames with parts, warranty, etc.

    I'd be buying the Titus directly from them so it would carry the warranty from On-one. I'm leaning towards the SL though. $500 is a good chunk of change to be saving.

  4. #4
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    Superlight all the way! I'm getting ready to buy one myself and money isn't even a factor! That's saying a lot. Plus it will be my second one. My first was a 2001. I've owned a few bikes since and am going back to the SL. I've only demo'd the Titus though, and it's just not as fun as the SL. Isn't the fun factor the main thing?

  5. #5
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    can you elaborate on your impressions about the Racer X, rayzer? exactly how do they compare?

  6. #6
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    The Superlight feels like it has an inch more of travel than the Racer X. It may be a more primitive design than the Titus, but it has been perfected over the years by Santa Cruz. The Titus uses a Horst Link design that is far from perfect. Designers are still trying to improve on fully active suspension designs and are coming pretty close to perfection, but that's more so with the DW link designs. That's a whole nother story though. Also, because the Superlight is a single pivot, it has less flex than designs with multiple links. For the most part. Plus it will just last longer, with less maintence. Hope I helped.

  7. #7
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    thanks rayzer. I've actually heard the opposite as far as the SC single pivots being flexy but neither here nor there. There are not many 4" XC bikes left on the market so it is going to be one of these two bikes. I'd love to throw a leg over a Pivot Mach 4 but not gonna happen at those prices.

  8. #8
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    The new SL is not flexy unless your diets designed around MacDonalds.Lovely timeless design thats got better with age

  9. #9
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    I'm definitely a Santa Cruz fan. I'm on my third Blur LT in as many years. I haven't owned a super light but I have had a bullit (same family of single pivot SC bikes). Although the bullet was an incredible climber given the weight of the bike it definitely had A LOT of short comings. I realise I just compared an XC bike to an AM/freeride bike but the design of the bike gives it it's ride quality.

    In keeping this short I would hands down down take the Titus assuming I could count on them or someone else to stand behind the frame. I don't know the whole story. I think the Titus is a far superior design. Sorry horst-link haters. As far as stiffness goes I would expect the Titus to be just as stiff if not more so than the SL. The SL is not a laterally stiff frame.

  10. #10
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    sweatybuscuit, you're making my decision harder now. I have head/read numerous people claim that the SC SL is a flexy frame. Just looking at the design, the rear triangle is relying on the shock connection as one of the 2 connecting points to the front triangle.

    Anyway, I should be able to get a long-enough demo on the SL in a week or two to make a decision about that frame. Shame that SC only makes the Blur XC in a carbon frame, puts it WAY out of my price range.

    Not many 4" XC frames left out there. Everyone wants more travel in their bikes now adays. Who needs a 5 or 6" XC frame anyway?

  11. #11
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    Its hardly worth taking the advice of someone thats never owned a SL and trying to compare it with a Bullits a complete waste of breath.The old SL wasnt the most rigid bike around but take it from me the new ones gr8.Theres a reason all the mountain bike mags rave about them,its because they are that good.A look thru the comments here should help http://www.mtbr.com/cat/bikes/xc-sus...9_1526crx.aspx
    Ive owned a swag of bikes and keep coming back to the SL as my perenial fave.

  12. #12
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    I've owned a heckler 5 and did find it to be some what flexy. That said, it's not like a wet noodle. I'm 215 and only noticed the flex on the downhills. Overall I think it was a great bike. I think I would take the SL over the titus. I haven't spent much time on horst link bikes, but I've always thought the design was good. However, the savings and simplicity of the SL and the unknown factor of the the titus ownership would push me towards the SL.

  13. #13
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    Coasting,
    Did I touch a nerve? Everything I said was true. Sorry if you don't like it. I sell SC bikes and know their products well. The SL is a great bike but too many people become so blinded by a brand (and or bike theyve purchased) that they lose the ability to objectively give advice. The Carbon Titus is twice the bike of the SL (I don't and never have sold Titus). The only reason I would second guess the Titus is due to the fact that it may be hard to source parts and service down the road.

  14. #14
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    Interesting u sell SC and yet u try and make assumptions about a bike based on the fact u have riden a Bullit.Thank god i dont shop with u.My opinions based on real world observations and im also involved in the bike industry for the last 15 yrs.Unfortunately this poor fellows asking for some sound advice and this thread has been hijacked by a muppet that i find myself irrated by

  15. #15
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    My only hesitation about going off of the reviews for the SL is due to the fact that a LOT of the reviewers are basing their opinions on the SL without having owned another full suspension bike. I do still take all of the reviews into consideration.
    It's all good though. I know some great riders that have owned Hecklers in the past and really liked them so there isn't a doubt that the SC singlepivots are great designs.
    I've owned a few FS frames so I have some expectations out of this next bike. Particularly, I want it to climb well, be fairly light and it must corner very well. I'm not so concerned with it being able to bomb downhill like a DH bike. I've got a bike that absolutely excels in that department but on the rides with a ton of climbing, it drags me down a bit.
    The potential flexing of the frame is only a concern when cornering hard on downhill switchbacks. I'm 205 and dropping back down to my summer weight of 185. I've had a frame that was a little flexy, laterally speaking, and for some reason it did bother me a bit.

    Thanks for all of the replies, guys. There's only one thing that I can do to settle my mind, epic demo ride. Shame I'll never get a demo on the Titus.

  16. #16
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    Don't take it personal. It's ok for you to still love your SL

  17. #17
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    Ultimately - once you're down to a class it really isn't about the bike. You're down to a choice between two pretty great bikes, so after all the hemming and hawing and anxiety about which one is going to be right, you're going to love the one you pick.

    So, flip a coin, get it, ride it, love it.

  18. #18
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    I used to own a Titus Racer-x (Alu); my wife owns a SL which I have ridden a fair few times. I don't know what type of riding you will be doing - some more info on that might help. IMO the R-X is a much better all around XC bike. I found it to be far quicker going uphill than the SL; it carved singletrack really well; and the frame was absolutely maintenance free for the several years I owned it. Given the limited travel and the geo of each, neither bike will be super capable going down gnar, but they are both pretty decent for the type of bikes they are.

    I would add that I also owned a Blur XC carbon; which beat the pants off both of these bikes. So, all that said, I would recommend you find a used XCc.

  19. #19
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    expatrider, thanks for the post. I'll be using the bike for general singletrack in N. GA. As I mentioned earlier, for those rides where the DH sections are bombing and/or super technical, I'd ride my El Kaboing. When the burliness of the EK isn't needed, and when there are tons of climbing with less technical DH I'll be riding this bike. General XC riding?

    yurtinus, you know... you're probably right.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnigro
    expatrider, thanks for the post. I'll be using the bike for general singletrack in N. GA. As I mentioned earlier, for those rides where the DH sections are bombing and/or super technical, I'd ride my El Kaboing. When the burliness of the EK isn't needed, and when there are tons of climbing with less technical DH I'll be riding this bike
    Then my vote is for the R-X. Either one you won't be disappointed, but Damn that R-X is fast . . .

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