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  1. #1
    mjw
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    nomad and ccdb adjustment

    just wondering who is running a double barrel with their nomad (or anything else), and what sort of adjustment you have made on the dials? just wondering

    i have for the most part, left it as is from it's factory setting. i think i backed the low speed rebound back a click to make is faster.

    just looking to see if i can;t dial it in any better right now...

  2. #2
    Lord of the Chainrings
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    Is there a CCDB "set-up chart" somewhere for Santa Cruz models?
    "Hesitation is the Mother of Failure!"

    ~~ 951 for Dirt & Roadster for Asphalt ~~

  3. #3
    TNC
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    Mudd, I haven't seen one in any of SC's info, and I haven't seen or heard any indication that they might be offering it as one of their "official" options, which would of course come with their recommendatios...but that may change over time. The shock's expense may be the biggest hurdle as to why SC would/wouldn't do an OEM option.

    That said, the shock doesn't have a ton of adjustments to deal with, so maybe setup won't be a big chore. I saw at least two Nomads at Moab that belonged to shop employees that were equipped with CCDBs, so that probably speaks fairly well for the shock's application on the bike. One of those had a Totem 2-Step and a CCDB...now that was a beefy setup. They let me "bounce test" it, and it felt like it had some awesome potential.

  4. #4
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    whats the big deal with the CCDB - in theory or practice - as it is getting very good rumours about it?

  5. #5
    TNC
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    I don't know...is there a "big deal"? I didn't notice anyone disagreeing with your statement about "good rumors" concerning the CCDB...other than maybe the price...LOL!

  6. #6
    mjw
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    i swapped out my travis for a totem coil as well. about to go ride it in a few minutes!

  7. #7
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    I'm sure this is tidbit of questionable wisdom comes as no suprise as many of you have been saything the same thing about the Nomand/VPP suspension for months. From what I heard the other day, some of the riders with CCDB's are backing the compression off more after every ride; they're finding the VPP suspension works better with less dampening. Overall, they love the DB and say it's killer once you get it set up for your style of riding.

    I'm still running the Roco TST and using less dampening-now if I could just get the rebound set to where I want it, I'd be a happy camper. I backed the littlle screw on the flip side of the shock out and got my rebound adjustment; I read about that in one of FM's posts; it works. I will say that I am tempted to give the Avalanche a try-but then again, I've always wanted to try an Avy. good luck; sometimes less is better

  8. #8
    Lord of the Chainrings
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    Mudd, I haven't seen one in any of SC's info, and I haven't seen or heard any indication that they might be offering it as one of their "official" options, which would of course come with their recommendatios...but that may change over time. The shock's expense may be the biggest hurdle as to why SC would/wouldn't do an OEM option.

    That said, the shock doesn't have a ton of adjustments to deal with, so maybe setup won't be a big chore. I saw at least two Nomads at Moab that belonged to shop employees that were equipped with CCDBs, so that probably speaks fairly well for the shock's application on the bike. One of those had a Totem 2-Step and a CCDB...now that was a beefy setup. They let me "bounce test" it, and it felt like it had some awesome potential.
    I'm looking forward to trying it out myself.
    "Hesitation is the Mother of Failure!"

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  9. #9
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    I've been wanting some input from others as well. I started with CC's stock settings, and it worked, but it pedaled too well, and wasn't quite plush enough. I decided that this must be because the leverage ratio of a Nomad is below the average bike, so it has less of an ability to compress at the 'average setting' as well as less of an ability to rebound on the 'average setting.'
    So, I decided to compensate for the lower leverage ratio by quickening the rebound and backing off the compression. I:

    unscrewed the low speed adjusters 2 clicks each
    unscrewed the high speed adjusters 1 turn each.

    I have since found that while this soaks up bumps phenomenally while pedaling and is very plush on easy downhills, it is prone to bottoming, and is not all that efficient. While I don't care much about the miniscule drop in efficiency, I do care about the DH performance. So I:

    turned the high speed compression knob back in a half a turn

    This left me at:

    1.5 turns in on high speed comp
    10 clicks out from fully closed low speed comp
    1 turn in from fully open on high speed reb
    14 clicks out from fully closed on low speed reb

    I like it right now. I do bottom it though, or so it feels that way on G-outs. On everything else it feels great. I am thinking of ramping up the high speed comp just a tad more and seeing how it feels.

    I weigh 190 in gear and run a 450lb Ti spring with the preload cranked in quite a bit (but not all the way).

    Any suggestions? I would love to know what other people have theirs at.

    Oh, while riding Whistler, the braking bumps were like a dream - a very smooth dream. I didn't notice it bottom all day, but I didn't hit the big stuff either (injuries mess with your head). I do bottom it on my stairset, or so it feels that way. I really need to figure out how to measure that... the bumper is too loose to stay put - any suggestions on that too?

  10. #10
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    I could really use some input from other Nomad riders with CCDB's on their bikes... I feel so 'out of the DB loop'

    Can we start a DB cult?

  11. #11
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    After Saturday's ride i think i'll be fiddling with the low speed compression a little bit soon. Probably just to open it up a click or two.

  12. #12
    M80
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    I have backed my low speed compression way off. That is pretty much what I have heard across the board from Nomad riders. Mostly just concentrating on the low speed comp. I can tell you It took me a few weeks to dial it in. Even then I had to hook up with a buddie's buddy who is the suspension adjustment king. He dial that bad boy in. He advised to keep backing the compression off as far as I could and still have it feel right.
    Also the shock should be popping the bummer on your bigger hits. The full stroke is being utilized. I have never bottomed it out. I have never heard the clank or felt it bottom out completely. I know it is crushing the bummer though by the marks left in the rubber from the shock body. Even the guys at CaneCreek will tell you that is probably the only draw back. The huge range of adjustment and that it takes a while to get it dialed in. But LAWD! when it is it's sweet.
    In the next couple of weeks I will be hopefully putting a Totem on the front and replacing the Fox 36. Selling it. I have access to the Totem for a good deal and it only has about two rides on it. I think that is probably getting the closest in front fork tech to keep up with the DB. The CaneCreek guys gave it a thumbs up. Their pro Chris runs that setup on his bike. I think it is an FSR. The way I see it is the Nomad is such a Bad@ZZ bike that I am only going to run Bad@zz equipment on it.
    ridebig.com I will be doing the cloudraker July 22. Let you know how the Nomad rocked it.
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  13. #13
    PULL
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    Quote Originally Posted by erikkellison

    I weigh 190 in gear and run a 450lb Ti spring with the preload cranked in quite a bit (but not all the way).
    How much sag are you running? How many turns of preload would you think?

  14. #14
    M80
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    I'm 6'3" and weigh 218. I run a 500lbs steel spring. I tighten down the collar just enough to hold the spring in place and to have no rattling. Gives me a little over an inch of sag.
    I'm All Mtn all the way. I ride up over and down. The sag has never been an issue. I did the Pisgah ride with that Turner gang a couple of weeks ago and I stayed up with the front runners or was the front runner. That's with a full pack and 2 100oz bladders full. Me and the Nomad showed them Turner boys what we were made of. The Nomad is as they say the do it all bike. Being in the South East you get a lot of kooks that want to tell you it's to much bike or it's a West Coast bike. Yeah sure for you it is.
    Scroll down to (Hiyah). That's me. Hip
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  15. #15
    not so super...
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    Quote Originally Posted by M80
    I'm 6'3" and weigh 218. I run a 500lbs steel spring. I tighten down the collar just enough to hold the spring in place and to have no rattling. Gives me a little over an inch of sag.
    I'm All Mtn all the way. I ride up over and down. The sag has never been an issue. I did the Pisgah ride with that Turner gang a couple of weeks ago and I stayed up with the front runners or was the front runner. That's with a full pack and 2 100oz bladders full. Me and the Nomad showed them Turner boys what we were made of. The Nomad is as they say the do it all bike. Being in the South East you get a lot of kooks that want to tell you it's to much bike or it's a West Coast bike. Yeah sure for you it is.
    Scroll down to (Hiyah). That's me. Hip
    We had to let him go first so we could get some room between us to get a clean DH run with out having to brake all the time!

    The CCDB runs best with about 30-35% sag. Probably the best shock I've tried on my bike and I've had most of the current popular choices.
    Nothing to see here.

  16. #16
    M80
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    Man you gotta watch your tongue. The lurkers are everywhere.
    Slipped over to the Santy board did yah?
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoManerz
    How much sag are you running? How many turns of preload would you think?
    I would say that I'm running 4 full turns, and have 30% sag. While it feels good going down the stairs, it FEELS like I'm bottoming, whether it's actually doing it or not. It does not feel good at the end of the stairset. It only feels bottomless when - well, it doesn't really feel bottomless at all. It feels functional, but not plush on the big hits. Maybe I'm just a whiner, but my last bike, the Free w/ the Roco, felt better. I might have to figure out a way to measure when it bottoms... and in the meanwhile, take it to Whistler and run some tests on it on Schleyer as that's about my ideal trail for versatility. Though I'll get back home, ride Galbraith, and be back on here complaining about pedal efficiency I just enjoy riding too much to want to stop and fiddle. I would rather just have someone tell me what I should have it at, and know that it's good enough. I'm no pro, and don't need that extra click for perfection. Even with it the way it is right now, it's still leagues better than the DHX (maybe I am picky after all - just not willing to put in the effort to fine tune it). I SHOULD go riding right now, but work calls, sadly. Maybe I'll test tomorrow.

  18. #18
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    Ahh, the latest update. I spent the day at Whistler on Sunday, and actually made an effort to stop riding so I could tune my shock while on the trail. I found this to work the best so far:
    High Speed Rebound: 1/2 turn in from full out
    High Speed Compression: 5/8 turn in from full out
    Low Speed Rebound: 12 turns in from full out
    Low Speed Compression: 14 turns in from full out

    I really noticed the difference on this setup when I was riding Lower Whistler Downhill and really felt the rear just stick to the ground. Instantly, what came to my mind was someone's comment about that "flat tire" feel. That's what I felt. I proceeded to fiddle, and lost that feel, and put it back to these settings. Next time I'm bringing a screwdriver instead of my keys...

    Seriously, y'all should post up what settings you have!

  19. #19
    mjw
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    running:
    low speed rebound: 2 clicks open from stock
    low speed comp: 2 clicks open from stock
    high speed rebound: stock setting
    low speed comp: stock setting

    feeeeels great

    was running a 400lbs spring (still am) with only enough preload to hold the spring in place and i am only getting .75" of sag and never bottom the thing unless landing a really heavy on the rear wheel.

    It seems someone bought a load of 5th element ti springs and is dumping them on ebay, and i picked up a 375 lbs spring for around $70.

    any thoughs? i am hoping i can utilize a little more travel durring regular riding (dh/fr) opposed to just off landings....just hopefully i'm not bottoming constantly.

    what spring weights are you folks using???

    any thoughs on the 375 weight?

  20. #20
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    I have never stopped fiddling with mine - it has become an obsession. Yes, I'm a bit OC
    I managed to tune it for high speed lift access big hit riding. Then I'll go ride some trails, and mess with it until it feels good there. Then I'll switch back. I am getting close to the point where I have a knack for adapting the settings to the terrain, but by no means is it easy. It takes a run or two to really make a decision about whether a setting is bad or not. But, I think I'm pretty close to having it fully figured out.
    Details:
    • 190lbs w/ gear
    • 35lb build w/ 66 Light and DH tires
    • 450lb spring
    • 35% sag
    • Bottoms once in a blue moon, and I hardly know when it does

    What I do notice is when the shock can't keep up with the terrain and the stutter bumps or root sections get really choppy. I then proceed to speed up the high speed rebound and comp, but that's where the never-ending fiddling begins...

    As for advice to the guy above, I would ask what he weighs first of all. It sounds like he's quite light, and that will influence the settings quite a bit. If you want to utilize more travel, I would run a lighter spring and if you're bottoming, just turn in the high speed comp some. I myself am planning on trying to turn out the high speed rebound more while leaving the high speed comp a half to a full turn in from all out. I may end up running the high speed rebound all the way out, but that gives me the feeling that my spring is too light (which it probably is...). Oh, if I were the guy above, I would definitely try the lighter spring. .75" is a little too little sag, especially with no preload.

  21. #21
    Lord of the Chainrings
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    I want someone to invent a small handheld "tuning tool" for the CCDB.

    Probably look like a "stubby" screwdriver blade with a socket welded to where the handle supposed to be, and some kind of "finger grip surface" in the middle.
    "Hesitation is the Mother of Failure!"

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  22. #22
    PULL
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    I am still fooling around with mine in the rock gardens. (vp-free with shorter nomad 8.5 ccdb)

    From the stock settings, I went

    two clicks softer on low speed compression
    two clicks softer on low speed rebound

    impressions -> got the flat tire feeling great for going down but not up...

    went to one click softer on both low speed compression & rebound from factory spec.

    Loving it now, matches my totem coil perfectly.
    Last edited by NoManerz; 09-05-2007 at 04:39 PM.

  23. #23
    mjw
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mudd
    I want someone to invent a small handheld "tuning tool" for the CCDB.

    Probably look like a "stubby" screwdriver blade with a socket welded to where the handle supposed to be, and some kind of "finger grip surface" in the middle.
    hows about a short stubby flat head with a right angle middle and socked style outlet on the other end of the right degree angle? no handle needed, it would work like an allen key: use the other end for leverahe

  24. #24
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    I've not changed my settings much at all. Closed up the high speed compression by about 1/3 of a turn and opened the low speed compression by 2 clicks. I just carry a small ring spanner and flat bladed screwdriver in my camelbak and haven't had any problems fiddling with the shock on the trail.

  25. #25
    Lord of the Chainrings
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by mjw
    hows about a short stubby flat head with a right angle middle and socked style outlet on the other end of the right degree angle? no handle needed, it would work like an allen key: use the other end for leverahe
    Brilliant! Time for a trip to the tool store!
    Pixs upcoming!
    "Hesitation is the Mother of Failure!"

    ~~ 951 for Dirt & Roadster for Asphalt ~~

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