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  1. #1
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    Nomad - Can't get Air... No jumping makes me sad.

    It seems Its almost impossible to get any airtime with my nomad, I don't know why,,, I've tried these rounded "bumps" (at around 6 inches high) at high speeds, but I seem to roll right over them instead of flying off them.

    However, I've seen videos where people get at least some air time over these bumps, how come I always roll right over. Possibly because my forks aren't set up correctly? Or maybe is there a technique to it instead of just charging at the bump with mad speed.

  2. #2
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    Whats your background in terms of riding experience?

    Certainly there is a lot more than hitting it with tons of speed.

    Without knowing much, I have to make some assumptions.

    One, and prob. the biggest, 6" high ain't going to get you anywhere with mad speed as you said. To use pure speed to hit a jump, it better be at least a foot half or 2 feet high. From my humble experience, you better be pedaling at least around 25mph to get air time with this little height. 6" is a typical curb height. With that in mind, I can picture why with a all-mountain type of bike like a nomad, you are just soaking up the hump.

    Secondly, if you seem to just roll over them, try stiffing up your fork and your shock. Dont know what system you are running, but again, if you are just using pure speed, lock all your shocks up as if you are riding a rigid bike with no front or rear suspension. However you do it, whether compression or rebound, that I have to actually see you physically to do it. I dont know what level of riding skills you have, so this might be useful if you already know how to jump, but otherwise, is not going to do much.

    Lastly, there is a world of technique of jumping. I assume you know that speed is only a very small part of it?

    Again, give us your riding experience resume, so I can point you to a better direction.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loll
    Whats your background in terms of riding experience?

    Certainly there is a lot more than hitting it with tons of speed.

    Without knowing much, I have to make some assumptions.

    One, and prob. the biggest, 6" high ain't going to get you anywhere with mad speed as you said. To use pure speed to hit a jump, it better be at least a foot half or 2 feet high. From my humble experience, you better be pedaling at least around 25mph to get air time with this little height. 6" is a typical curb height. With that in mind, I can picture why with a all-mountain type of bike like a nomad, you are just soaking up the hump.

    Secondly, if you seem to just roll over them, try stiffing up your fork and your shock. Dont know what system you are running, but again, if you are just using pure speed, lock all your shocks up as if you are riding a rigid bike with no front or rear suspension. However you do it, whether compression or rebound, that I have to actually see you physically to do it. I dont know what level of riding skills you have, so this might be useful if you already know how to jump, but otherwise, is not going to do much.

    Lastly, there is a world of technique of jumping. I assume you know that speed is only a very small part of it?

    Again, give us your riding experience resume, so I can point you to a better direction.

    Maybe he isn't even preloading the bike, let alone suspension. If he is then I think you've got him going in a good direction.
    "To crush your enemies, see them driven before, and to hear the lamentation of the women."

  4. #4
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    I'm running a Talas RC2 and a DHX air 5.0. They are both pretty springy and not stiff at all.

    I have no experience in terms of jumping. My wheels have never left the ground before . I've always figured I'd use what I learned in physics and just approach with mad speed, I do know that speed is only a small part of it, but its the only part I know (hence why this thread was created )

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by vysis
    I'm running a Talas RC2 and a DHX air 5.0. They are both pretty springy and not stiff at all.

    I have no experience in terms of jumping. My wheels have never left the ground before . I've always figured I'd use what I learned in physics and just approach with mad speed, I do know that speed is only a small part of it, but its the only part I know (hence why this thread was created )
    go build a jump in your back yard. Start small. Just build a small kicker to flat. Work on that, and work on bunnyhopping. to bunnyhop, start by compressing off the rear wheel and pushing down into the ground, while lifting in the front end up, then arc the bike up into the air by bringing the front wheel steady and the rear wheel following it up into the air.

    when you hit your kicker, use this technique, and time is so that you're compressing the suspension as you approach the kicker and so that you time your jump that that its right off the top of the lip when your suspension is at max compression.

    I wouldn't worry about your suspension at all. Thats almost certainly not the problem. If there is anybody nearby who does jumps (hint: even if it sucks to ask some little punk kid, do it anyway, punk kids are great at jumping for some reason! and they're generally pretty cool about it) to help you out.

  6. #6
    KEEP ROLLING
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    get brian lopes book on mountain bike skills practice them and the rest is history.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by congarong
    get brian lopes book on mountain bike skills practice them and the rest is history.
    TRUE

    And learn to J-hop (basically an "ollie" on a bike), NOT bunny hop and you can launch some nice air off of even 6" hits!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  8. #8
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    okay vysis, here is a quickie. Do it at your own risk. Is free air, but dont go big right from the get go.

    Find a nice curb at a car free area. Ride as fast as you can off of it. You dont need to lift or anything.

    You should be able to get about a second or two of air time.

    Now practice this until it become second nature and you feel extremely comfortable. Then start lifting the handle bar up and toward you, focus on the up part. Do this right before you take off on the edge of the curb.

    This is the quickess no skill needed air I can think of. Now look for bigger things to ride off of. Keep in mind the bigger they are, the more important it is that you pull up.

    Now, look for similar things on the trail that will let you do this.

    I think this is 1/10th of a step toward experiencing airborne. But it should get you started to enjoy your nomad more. And as others said, your next step is to learn how to bunnyhop, j-hop, launch off stuffs.

    May I suggest one thing. I assume you are not a young gun and heal injures quick. So wear some jeans and long sweat shirt to do this.
    Last edited by Loll; 08-31-2008 at 06:38 PM.

  9. #9
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    J hopping is a bunny-hop off a wheelie right?

    However, I can never get a wheelie either (im so useless ). I almost either always overpull and land on my precious behind or I dont pull high enough and just drop back down.

  10. #10
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    I found this to be true when I had a Nomad as well. It's a hard bike to preload and get up. J-hopping was okay but preloading before trail obstacles and such yielded little to no effect. I think its the unfortunate flipside of the fact that the bike soaks up rough stuff so well. I'm on a DB Mission now and it's way easier to hop, skip, and jump.
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  11. #11
    Bring on the Funk!
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    In all seriousness, I think you should just give me your Nomad and your jumping woes will be forever remedied.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by vysis
    J hopping is a bunny-hop off a wheelie right?

    However, I can never get a wheelie either (im so useless ). I almost either always overpull and land on my precious behind or I dont pull high enough and just drop back down.
    Take it easy buddy. It took me about 1.5 decade of practicing wheelie before I can do this good. Same for jumping. But as my buddies will testify, I am still no where near a good jumper even to this day. Usually if it is something I want to learn, I will spend at least an hour a day for a wk practicing it at the driveway, over and over again. This is the perfect activity during winter when everywhere is a mess to ride. Find a friend who already know how to do these moves (jumping, wheelie-ing...) and ask him to spend an hour demonstrating the finer keypoints up close and personal, and practice like crazy.

    These stuffs doesn't happen overnight unless you come to mountain biking with a extreme sports background like motocross or snowboarding.

    One last suggestion, check youtube.com. Type in the move you want to learn, and watch how the person does it in the video. Or as someone suggested, you can always ask the neigborhood kids too.

    btw, J-hop is not exactly wheelie and jump. You are doing another move call manualing.

  13. #13
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    upgrade your nomad by buying a bmx, learn the bunny hop and from then on in its all a doddle
    best 'upgrade' i ever made

  14. #14
    Ariolimax columbianus
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzboy
    In all seriousness, I think you should just give me your Nomad and your jumping woes will be forever remedied.
    +1...... sounds like too much bike for you. get back on your hardtail and practice. try riding as fast as you can can into a curb and try bunny hopping it, if you can't you'll prolly screw up the rear wheel. hopefully after enough times of casing the curb w/your rear wheel your muscles will learn the motion and eventually you'll make it up that curb. take your newly learned skill off da lip.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzboy
    In all seriousness, I think you should just give me your Nomad and your jumping woes will be forever remedied.
    Lol, sure, just wire me $5000 and I'll ship it ASAP

  16. #16
    CAN YOU DIG IT??!!??!!!??
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    Rent some bike videos and hit the slow-mo button again & again & again,........& again....get it ?? Watch every frame and what happens just prior to the take off of each jump/drop. You'll see the mechanics of it broken down "plain as day". This helped me a lot. Also, video yerself, this will give you "real time honest assessment of your riding".
    "Why are you willing to take so much & leave others in need...just because you can?"

  17. #17
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    you know what I used to do. Lean the bike against a smooth wall. Go on it, and practice lifting the front end and rear end, and then together.

    In one afternoon of doing this, my buddies and I all learned how to bunnyhop.

  18. #18
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    Another thing no one has mentioned is to increase the shock/fork platform damping to give you something to push off of. I do that and slow down the rebound damping slightly when jump park riding.

    Have FUN!

    G
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  19. #19
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    Not to seem mean about this question but, why do you own such a nice bike that 90% of the biking population doesn't but yet you haven't really ever jumped a ramp or dirt jump in the past, I agree with some of the others, start out on a rigid bmx/hardtail first then go back to full suspension once you have that down because otherwise if you never learn to be smooth on a hardtail and all you ride is a full suspension all of the time you'll learn to rely on your travel to get you out of situations that could have been prevented in the first place. i can almost guarantee you'll NEVER become smooth and fluid if you rely on your nomad for learning the ropes of biking 101 . Riding a hardtail MAKES you become a smoother rider
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  20. #20
    STINKY TOFU
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    dosnt everyone here always preach "buy the best bike you can afford"? Now riding beyond his abilities is a whole different matter.
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  21. #21
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    yeah, and then most of us move downward toward the heckler/blt line from bullit and vp frees, or from heckler/blts to blur and superlites.

    Its an evolution that must be experienced first before the lesson is learn

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScBullitFr3rider
    Not to seem mean about this question but, why do you own such a nice bike that 90% of the biking population doesn't but yet you haven't really ever jumped a ramp or dirt jump in the past, I agree with some of the others, start out on a rigid bmx/hardtail first then go back to full suspension once you have that down because otherwise if you never learn to be smooth on a hardtail and all you ride is a full suspension all of the time you'll learn to rely on your travel to get you out of situations that could have been prevented in the first place. i can almost guarantee you'll NEVER become smooth and fluid if you rely on your nomad for learning the ropes of biking 101 . Riding a hardtail MAKES you become a smoother rider
    The only part I have trouble with is the actual getting my wheels off the air part. In terms of riding abilities, although I may not be a pro, I would say I am pretty skilled.

  23. #23
    Bring on the Funk!
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzboy
    Nice vid. That is a J-hop tho and not a bunny hop. A bunny hop is simply pre-loading the fork and pedals and both wheels leave at the same time as you push up and forward on the bars. The J-hop is much more useful as an mtb skill - especially for log hops.
    More: http://www.bicycling.com/article/1,6...1313-1,00.html

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  25. #25
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaNEsGD44EI

    It's the same skill applied to a 12" jump and beyond.

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