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  1. #1
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    DIY grease fittings on new VPP lower link

    Thought I'd try a little experiment to make maintaining my Blur LT a little easier. I got one of the new forged lower links from SC today and used some Alemite 1877 press-in grease fittings I had to make it easy to lube the bores. Same idea as the BLT2 links. I can use the same grease injector that I have from an old bike with a WTB Grease Guard bottom bracket.
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  2. #2
    TNC
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    Good work. OK...how do you see grease getting into the bearings...or is this only for keeping the pivot axles lubed? This is not a flame or challenge to what you're doing...just want to see where you're headed with this concept. I've been thinking about an issue like this. Man-with-one-hand and I had discussed this some time back. I commented about some possibilities back then but want to hear about how you think this will work.

  3. #3
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    I saw the new ports on a BLT.. and they come across as good idea but at a bad height for rocks..But yours are smaller in height.. Yours may work better than SC...hmmm
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  4. #4
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    Thanks TNC. I don't expect that this will do anything towards lubing the bearings. It's just an alternative to coating the axles with anti-seize compound or having to pull it all apart to lube the axles with grease every so often. This way I can just inject some grease and force any crud around the axles out along with the old grease. I'll be changing the current crankset next week so I'll swap out the lower link while I have the cranks off and see how it works.

    I'd heard about the fittings on the BLT2 links before I saw any photos and I was surprised that they used standard automotive fittings because of their relatively high profile, but I'm sure they had their reasons. I bet the ones I used save at least 3 or 4 grams though...

  5. #5
    TNC
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    ric, I wonder if one could remove the inner rubber covers on the cassette bearings and leave only the outside covers? Would it be possible to inject grease into the cavity until you start to see it "ooze" out the outer bearing rubber covers? This is what has been going through my mind. It would probably be worth it at least to keep the pivot axles lubed. Good work on your part.

  6. #6
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    It'd be nice, but I don't think that would work without some sort of fancy seal between the link and bearings. The grease is gonna take the path of least resistance, so if you remove the inner seals on the bearings it'd just be easier for the grease to escape between the link and the bearing. I think it'd be hard to get enough of a seal between the link and bearings to force the grease out around the outer bearing seal. The bearings are probably fairly well sealed on their own and if not, you can take advantage of SC's lifetime bearing warranty.

  7. #7
    TNC
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    I don't know. I'd think a substantial amount of grease might be able to make its way into the bearings. The path of least resistance is correct, but the momentary pressure induced by the stroke of the grease gun is what allows grease to get into the necessary areas of many parts with grease zerks. While the path of least resistance will allow the grease to come out of a seal area or close clearance area, the higher pressure of the gun's stroke still causes decent pressure momentarily to get grease into the component...whether its an automotive ball joint, u-joint, bearing, or bushing. This may be why SC adopted the automotive style grease zerk so a high volume, high pressure stroke of grease can be applied by an automotive gun. The little bicycle hand units are great for most applications, but you don't get much volume or pressure.

  8. #8
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    Very nice!!!!
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    This may be why SC adopted the automotive style grease zerk so a high volume, high pressure stroke of grease can be applied by an automotive gun. The little bicycle hand units are great for most applications, but you don't get much volume or pressure.
    You can still use a full size, as you are calling it - "automotive style" grease gun with those needle fittings. You just put a needle fitting adapter on your grease gun, push it into it, and pump away.
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  10. #10
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    Yeah, I've been thinking of doing that instead of using the injector I've got. That way I could use a heavier grease than I've got in the injector, maybe even waterproof wheel bearing grease for boat trailers. With the lower link I think the grease serves as much to keep the crud out as it does to lube the axles. Wheel bearing grease may be a little too heavy to force through the link assembly with a needle tip grease gun though. Anyone have suggestions for what grease would be best?

  11. #11
    TNC
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    Good point...

    Quote Originally Posted by 1996cc
    You can still use a full size, as you are calling it - "automotive style" grease gun with those needle fittings. You just put a needle fitting adapter on your grease gun, push it into it, and pump away.
    I forgot that I have to use one on the front "cardan" joint on the driveshaft of my 4X4...uses the pinhole style rather than a zerk.

  12. #12
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    Love the new forged link! Way better design.
    Costs $38 from SC.
    Since I don't ride through water, "Anti-Seize" should be enough to live with, here in SoCal.
    Anyone try installing zerk fittings on one?
    Last edited by Mudd; 09-15-2008 at 08:29 AM.
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  13. #13
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    On my old Blur classic I detach the shock, lay it on its side and squirt a little gear oil on the caps of the lower pivots. Work it in a little and let it sit overnight. Wipe off the excess and go. It's a little messy but beats a noisy bike. Last bearing replacement in 2006. All was quiet for about 1 year when the squeaks started again. Figure what the heck and tried the oil. It's quiet.

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