Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: drumbum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    603

    damper to account for increased head angle on blur?

    Hi all,
    Many of you have probably seen my threads asking about the increased head angle when using a 5 inch fork on a Blur Classic. Alot of you responded with answers such as "better descents, but it slips a bit on the climbs". I got to thinking, and was wondering:

    If I chose to run a 5 inch fork on my Blur Classic, would a Hopey Steering Damper help with the traction and lines on climbs? I know it would help in any normal situation, but do you think it could specifically rectify the problems of running 5 inches in front on the Blur classic?

    Thanks,
    Vaughn

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: drumbum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    603
    Bump

  3. #3
    Trail Rider
    Reputation: Quattro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    915
    Quote Originally Posted by drumbum
    Hi all,
    Many of you have probably seen my threads asking about the increased head angle when using a 5 inch fork on a Blur Classic. Alot of you responded with answers such as "better descents, but it slips a bit on the climbs". I got to thinking, and was wondering:

    If I chose to run a 5 inch fork on my Blur Classic, would a Hopey Steering Damper help with the traction and lines on climbs? I know it would help in any normal situation, but do you think it could specifically rectify the problems of running 5 inches in front on the Blur classic?

    Thanks,
    Vaughn
    My buddy runs a long fork on his classic. It has adjustable travel. When it is long position it feels rather high in the front(chopper). That works well for him on the DH runs, and he cranks it down on the climbs and can climb just about anything. He has a Minute, which I believe is 130 mm.
    [size=4]Don[/size]

  4. #4
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059
    Our shop owner had a Blur with a 5" fork on it...recently swapped to a BLT. I rode that Blur on our local trail with the fork in its full length. I thought it climbed like a billy goat and didn't notice any "hunting" or wandering. The front wheel struck great. I'm used to riding slack geometry bike setups and perhaps use a little different technique. However, I'm beginning to wonder why some are "so" sensitive to a little taller A to C fork setup. Obviously one can go too far with a really, really tall fork, but I've found that most bikes I've owned or ridden can take a pretty tall fork before handling really goes to pot. Do some of these riders just want to sit in the "middle" of their bikes and not move at all? Heck, I'm 54 years old, and even I can "scootch" forward a bit and/or lean forward a bit to balance weight transfer for climbing. One does this all the time on a dirt motorcycle for optimum handling. The upside of a more relaxed geometry on the front end of your bike comes when you hit the technical sections...either on flat ground or going downhill. It's easier to make up for a slacker front end than it is to try and compensate for a steep front end setup. Besides, as some have pointed out, there are some really good travel reduction style forks that can minimize the effects of a tall fork for extended climbing sessions.

    Your idea on the Hopey system would probably help, but I'd rather go with a quality travel reduction type fork.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •