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  1. #1
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    Butcher trail-side maintenance basics ?

    Just brought home a 2012 Butcher in a D kit with the RP23 upgrade. She's a sweet machine and I'm eager to get her on the trail.

    Before I get too far off the beaten path, I was hoping to get some advice on trail-side maintenance basics for a bike such as this. It's my first full suspension bike and the fork, brajkes, drive train, frame technology has advanced a LOT since I bought my last bike.

    So what tools to you ride with? What maintenance skills, i.e. "things you must know how to fix," should a rider have in order to repair/patch common trail-side problems? I'm mostly thinking about the hydraulic brakes, suspension tuning, and drive train. I've never owned a bike with air shocks, hydraulic brakes or a chain tensioner. I don't know what, if any, common maintenance issues you might encounter on the trail. The old hard-tail was a pretty simple machine and I never had a problem I couldn't fix with a multi-tool.

    I've searched around this site but there are a LOT of threads and I didn't have much luck. If there is a site you can point me to, tips and tricks and whatnot, I'd be much obliged.


  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigsky406 View Post
    Just brought home a 2012 Butcher in a D kit with the RP23 upgrade. She's a sweet machine and I'm eager to get her on the trail.

    Before I get too far off the beaten path, I was hoping to get some advice on trail-side maintenance basics for a bike such as this. It's my first full suspension bike and the fork, brajkes, drive train, frame technology has advanced a LOT since I bought my last bike.

    So what tools to you ride with? What maintenance skills, i.e. "things you must know how to fix," should a rider have in order to repair/patch common trail-side problems? I'm mostly thinking about the hydraulic brakes, suspension tuning, and drive train. I've never owned a bike with air shocks, hydraulic brakes or a chain tensioner. I don't know what, if any, common maintenance issues you might encounter on the trail. The old hard-tail was a pretty simple machine and I never had a problem I couldn't fix with a multi-tool.

    I've searched around this site but there are a LOT of threads and I didn't have much luck. If there is a site you can point me to, tips and tricks and whatnot, I'd be much obliged.

    All you really can do is carry a shock pump with you, just in case you want, or need to change pressures in the suspension. As far as everything else, brakes, etc, just keep them clean & running smooth, make sure they are working properly before you ride. I carry extra brake pads just in case too. All the new tech is pretty reliable. Only thing I have had fail is my Reverb seatpost the trail, which sucked, but was not a ride ender.

  3. #3
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    Just carry your multi tool, a patch kit and a tube. Shock pump use at the car, otherwise, you're good to go, unless you are bikepacking or trekking.
    As was said, your brakes, forks and shocks are super reliable. Just lube and go
    Worst I've had happen trailside are pinch flats and chain snap. You can even limp back with a couple spokes missing.
    Enjoy your new bike

  4. #4
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    I agree with the post above with only a few small additions, compact tire pump and some chain link pins in case the chain snaps if you are running the Shimano HG-X chain. I just got the Park rescue tool with the chain pin tool and it worked awesome yesterday when I was installing my MRP 2x chain guide. Everything becomes subjective though when it comes to what people carry. I'm Military so carrying extra weight in my hydration pack doesn't bother me.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by smittysc View Post
    I agree with the post above with only a few small additions, compact tire pump and some chain link pins in case the chain snaps if you are running the Shimano HG-X chain. I just got the Park rescue tool with the chain pin tool and it worked awesome yesterday when I was installing my MRP 2x chain guide. Everything becomes subjective though when it comes to what people carry. I'm Military so carrying extra weight in my hydration pack doesn't bother me.
    I had the MRP 2X installed at the shop when I bought it. That thing is sweet. You don't even know it's on there. I was amazed at how quiet it is. I don't know what I expected. The mini bash guard is nice too. It's a sweet unit.

  6. #6
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    Spare derailleur hanger.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mestapho View Post
    Spare derailleur hanger.
    Strongly second that. Order one from SC now, you won't regret it!

    Zip ties and a couple of power links if you run a 9 speed SRAM chain.

    Suspension failures are pretty rare trail-side, unless you're really unlucky. Same goes for brakes (unless you run Avid Juicys, in which case I'd pack some extra pads, or at least an extra spring).

    Enjoy yer new bike!

  8. #8
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    Definitely a derailleur hangar.

    SRAM power links

    Ive never had any problems with suspension or anything except once on my old Superlight when I snapped the main pivot axle coming off a jump. That was a freak occurence though. I wouldnt carry a shock pump. Just set it up before you ride and you should be fine. Fine tune when you get back for your next ride if you dont like the way it feels.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sooner518 View Post
    SRAM power links
    Spare tube(s) and a pump or CO2.

    Really the best thing to do is check your bike before you leave. There are a lot of things you can do every day in just a couple of minutes. The only things I've broken on the trail are chain, tubes, tires, and shifter cables.

    Check tire PSI.
    Spin the wheels make sure they are still true.
    Make sure the brakes work, aren't leaking and the pads are good.
    Make sure the suspension isn't leaking, making strange noises and works fine.
    Check that the shifters are working and that your shifter cables aren't fraying (usually at the end where they mount in the derailleur).

    Once a month I check that all bolts are nice and snug still and that nothing has loosened up. If you have a good tool you can do this in about 2 minutes.

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