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  1. #1
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    Brakes for a Nomad

    Picking up my new Nomad on Monday. For the time being I will be using the XT disc brakes off my Blur classic with 160mm rotors.

    I can't make up my mind on the brakes I want for this baby! My options are to upgrade the XT's to 203mm or buy new Juicy 5's with 185 / 185. The second option involves buying new shifters as my existing brakes are STI.

    I'm 225 lbs and ride aggressive XC. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    FishZapper
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    I have to go ahead and throw out my vote for Hayes El Caminos. They are the best, most adjustable brakes Ive ever used. I have them on my bullit and couldnt be happier. The wont work with your shifters, but you should be running SRAM stuff anyway

  3. #3
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    Sram

    SRAM huh? I must admit I do like those carbon levers!

  4. #4
    TC3
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    If you wanna keep your STI combo, you can consider a pair of Saint 203mm.
    It will provide plenty of stopping power for your weight.
    Magura Louise FR 210/190 mm has been trouble free on my Uzzi,
    and it modulates better than Saint, and has about the same range of stopping power.

  5. #5
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoTreadOnMe
    I have to go ahead and throw out my vote for Hayes El Caminos. They are the best, most adjustable brakes Ive ever used. I have them on my bullit and couldnt be happier. The wont work with your shifters, but you should be running SRAM stuff anyway
    Nah, no way, NADA. ---, Juicy Seven's (definitely not Five's). I think Blue Sky still has their killer clearance sale on: as I recall $130 for 165mm and $150 for 185mm (which is plenty big for me.) Setup took a 1/2 hour each wheel and I didn't even have to look at the manual. So far silent and they'll stop you cold if you want. Great modulation and adjustable pad contact point via the red knob. Banjo cable adjustment which is cool. If they do the famous 'turkey gobble' (mine didn't), see if they are too mounted too low with the supplied adaptor. They shouldn't grab on the arms of the rotor, just the wavy part. If they gobble, stick a thin washer on the bolt between the adapter and the brake. This gets 'em futher outboard.. Oh yeah, if you ride really hard and crash occasionally, these are tough to break. You might want to move the red knob on the levers to the bottom, where it's more protected. See the website for the pdf.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by whangen
    Nah, no way, NADA. ---, Juicy Seven's (definitely not Five's). I think Blue Sky still has their killer clearance sale on: as I recall $130 for 165mm and $150 for 185mm (which is plenty big for me.) Setup took a 1/2 hour each wheel and I didn't even have to look at the manual. So far silent and they'll stop you cold if you want. Great modulation and adjustable pad contact point via the red knob. Banjo cable adjustment which is cool. If they do the famous 'turkey gobble' (mine didn't), see if they are too mounted too low with the supplied adaptor. They shouldn't grab on the arms of the rotor, just the wavy part. If they gobble, stick a thin washer on the bolt between the adapter and the brake. This gets 'em futher outboard.. Oh yeah, if you ride really hard and crash occasionally, these are tough to break. You might want to move the red knob on the levers to the bottom, where it's more protected. See the website for the pdf.
    Why not 5's? Nobody seems to use the pad adjustment.
    "Do not touch the trim"

  8. #8
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    Magura Louise FR for sheer power and silent operation. Plus the brake levers are shaped very nicely.... Great for two-finger actuation.

    I'd pick the Hayes brakes in terms of brake lever/reservoir durability. The brake levers are pretty svelte, and feel nearly as good as Magura. They offer really decent power, but stop short of the OTB grip of Magura brakes.

    Avid in terms of adjustment, user-friendliness, and general price. Their power is on par with the Hayes hydro brakes, but I daresay that the Hayes rotors offer more grab than Avids. Avids seem to offer more modulation than Hayes or Magura.

    The only omission here is Shimano hydro brakes and Hopes.
    I hate Shimano stuff, so I haven't evaluated their brakes.... no real reason, just personal preference.
    Hope stuff is just too damn expensive here, so I passed on them.
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  9. #9
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    don't go avid, keep your shimano brakes, if you want to spend it on something go sram shifting.

    Shimano Brakes and Sram Shifting best of both worlds.... (yeah you'll have to get new levers to dump that STI stuff, if you like the STI keep it)

    The avids are over rated, tons of power, excellent lever position, no modulation, and horrible feel.

  10. #10
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    I was offered an almost new pair of xtr disc brakes with 203mm rotors today. I may go for them.

    Sram shifters means sram rear mech doesn't it?

  11. #11
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    Go for the Juicy 7s. 1/2 hour to set up? More like 1/2 minutes. You install them loose, grab the lever to tighten the pads, torque the bolts and you are done. No squeeks, no shimming and several of the online stores have them at $126. They make a carbone set now if you have the extra bucks. I am running Avids with Shimano shifters but really want to go with teh SRAM X.0s.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Castle

    The avids are over rated, tons of power, excellent lever position, no modulation, and horrible feel.
    IMO you pretty much got that all backward, bro.

    Excellent lever position? I'll let that go... sure don't know what that means. Almost all quality brake levers have the basic adjustments for throw, contact and rotation (that handbar clamp with a bolt in it).

    Avids have GREAT modulation thanks to the adjustable contact point (red knob) and the wavy rotors plus a host of other improvements - some people complain they have too much modulation, which is certainly valid. But that's down to personal preference.

    Hey, you can even slide your travel coffee mug with a handle up behind the lever and there's a sweet little notch on the back that cradles it... is that cool enough!!!

    The feel of the levers is superb and silky, with a nice fat width where your pointer finger pad rests. You can scar it with a file to make it less slippery, but don't go deep. I wouldn't say they are overrated since even the owners of the Sevens (like me) will admit they do not have raw stopping power unless you really bear down --- ie 'panic stop'. I kinda like this cuz it eliminates OTB adventures. In other words they are not grabby, which as a feature I happen to like. But, be warned, If you're hucking 15-20 cliffs and the runout is maybe ten feet, don't get Juicys. If you ride lots of technical ST and love moderate to big hucks and jumps, Avids will fill the bill just fine.
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  13. #13
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    Avid or Marta, you decide!

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim Mac
    Go for the Juicy 7s. 1/2 hour to set up? More like 1/2 minutes. You install them loose, grab the lever to tighten the pads, torque the bolts and you are done. No squeeks, no shimming and several of the online stores have them at $126. They make a carbone set now if you have the extra bucks. I am running Avids with Shimano shifters but really want to go with teh SRAM X.0s.
    Oh yeah... you got that right. And the price on Sevens is sweet. Marta's are probably a better brake tho tricky to set up (or so I hear). But hey, they're also over $200 a wheel, cuz of the German tariff rules. That sucks so bad.
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  14. #14
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    What about Saint brakes?

  15. #15
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    Update

    I have been offered a nearly new pair of xtr disc brakes with 203mm rotors which I'm going to buy.

    I HATE those dang STI things! When I grab the brake in an emergency I always end up grabbing a few gears as well. It also makes it hars to set up my bar for one finger braking.

    I'm fitting xt shifters but eventually hope to go for SRAM.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim Mac
    Go for the Juicy 7s. 1/2 hour to set up? More like 1/2 minutes. You install them loose, grab the lever to tighten the pads, torque the bolts and you are done. No squeeks, no shimming and several of the online stores have them at $126. They make a carbone set now if you have the extra bucks. I am running Avids with Shimano shifters but really want to go with teh SRAM X.0s.
    The Sram XO's are no big deal, i'll be getting rid of mine. Fancy carbon plate and loads of useless adjustments, no gear indicator and twice the price of XTR. The reason they'll be going though is that after years of using Shimano triggers, i can't adapt to the thumb shift rather than index finger. They shift ok, but NO better than my three year old XTR's and i tend to knock the small trigger with my thumb while wrestling the bike uphill which results in changing to a harder gear just when i need it least. I'll be going back to XO twisters to use with the XO rear mech.( which IS a big improvement over Shimano.)

    All IMO ofcourse
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  17. #17
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    Saints?

    Quote Originally Posted by intheways
    What about Saint brakes?
    Sorry, don't have any experience with them, nor do I know anybody that has... maybe you should start a thread?

    I take that back, do know one guy... sez he likes them. Price is good for what you get but you do need shimano specific hubs (or I think you can buy an adapter for the rotor to go to 6 bolt IS, but thats just more money.) May need a special spline tool also... ie, more money. Don't know that for sure but that's the way the big S operates these days.
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  18. #18
    TC3
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    Quote Originally Posted by whangen
    Sorry, don't have any experience with them, nor do I know anybody that has... maybe you should start a thread?

    I take that back, do know one guy... sez he likes them. Price is good for what you get but you do need shimano specific hubs (or I think you can buy an adapter for the rotor to go to 6 bolt IS, but thats just more money.) May need a special spline tool also... ie, more money. Don't know that for sure but that's the way the big S operates these days.
    Those Saint brakes used to have normal 6 bolt rotor as an option before.
    You might be able to find these if you search around.
    or, you can just get the Saint calipers and use any kind of 203mm rotors.
    One of my friend is running Saint brakes with 203mm Hayes rotors and loving the combo.
    I would say it has more power than my Louise FR 210mm/190mm (mine modulates better, tho)

  19. #19
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    I just got my Gustavs today.... and I think they're gonna work excellently for my Nomad. I'll let ya'll know how they do.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bombardier
    I just got my Gustavs today.... and I think they're gonna work excellently for my Nomad. I'll let ya'll know how they do.
    Be sure to wear your helmet
    You can't make a racehorse out of a donkey, but you can make a fast donkey.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by starsky
    Picking up my new Nomad on Monday. For the time being I will be using the XT disc brakes off my Blur classic with 160mm rotors.

    I can't make up my mind on the brakes I want for this baby! My options are to upgrade the XT's to 203mm or buy new Juicy 5's with 185 / 185. The second option involves buying new shifters as my existing brakes are STI.

    I'm 225 lbs and ride aggressive XC. Any suggestions?

    I understand you have the new XT brakes.
    Do you know the old XT version ? (4 piston ?)
    I think those are still one of the best systems available. They can be found pretty cheap these days, are super reliable, and have plenty of stopping power & good modulation.
    I know I'm getting one of these for my Nomad.

  22. #22
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    Of course you can afford Gustavs... your're from Baden-Wurtemburg, Germany, for crips sakes!

    When you figure in the devalued US dollar and the sundry tariff issues, plus the famous German economic protectionism, they probably cost you in American dollars about $3.49 a wheel! Sorry, just jealous.

    How about talking to some of countrymen and giving the rest of the world a break on rates exchange!
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by whangen
    Of course you can afford Gustavs... your're from Baden-Wurtemburg, Germany, for crips sakes!

    When you figure in the devalued US dollar and the sundry tariff issues, plus the famous German economic protectionism, they probably cost you in American dollars about $3.49 a wheel! Sorry, just jealous.

    How about talking to some of countrymen and giving the rest of the world a break on rates exchange!

    Well as we in Europe pay about 3000$ for a nomad frame (with some discount), I would say that we deserve to get few things cheaper (but my nomad will still have Juicy Carbon on it )

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bombardier
    I just got my Gustavs today.... and I think they're gonna work excellently for my Nomad.
    Yeesss, go with the best of the two worlds. My Gustavs arrived short after christmas and the frame to mount them had his touchdown yesterday evening. I'm only waiting for the big disk adapters to arrive tomorrow morning.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by whangen
    IMO you pretty much got that all backward, bro.

    Excellent lever position? I'll let that go... sure don't know what that means.
    well I'll help by cluing you in, this is taken directly from avids site, if you look at the shape of the brake lever assembly, not just the lever blade. It is rotated/offset different then any other brake available, it offers a excellent lever position for your hand. read on, might learn a thing or two.

    "Juicy’s work with your hand...not against it. Other hydraulic levers are designed with a high X Factor (that’s the distance from the center of the handle bar to the pivot), which means the arc of the lever’s path actually moves in and away from your hand’s natural movement. All Juicys have the lowest X Factor on the market, so the lever moves comfortably, powerfully, right in line with the direction of your hand. Seems like a small thing, but wait until you ride with a pair." taken directly from www.sram.com


    Quote Originally Posted by whangen
    Avids have GREAT modulation thanks to the adjustable contact point (red knob) and the wavy rotors plus a host of other improvements - some people complain they have too much modulation, which is certainly valid. But that's down to personal preference.
    First off, the red knob, adjustable pad contact point does nothing for how firm the break engages it merely changes the distance between the rotor and pad engaging at the lever. If your brakes are soft and do not have a firm feel, you should bleed your system, this will determine how firmly your brake engages not the distance between your pad/rotor contact point.

    I have worked on/installed (many sets of these breaks) and throroughly tested both the juicy 7 and 5 for a full season. I tried to make these brakes perform as they should. I tried multiple rotor/pad combinations was never able to get rid of there stabbiness or shuttering. This same problem plagues many customers and slowly avid is trying to do something about it quietly. They have released and are shipping a roundagon rotor this year which is suppose to help address some of these issues. I think next should be pad compound.


    Quote Originally Posted by whangen
    In other words they are not grabby, which as a feature I happen to like. But, be warned, If you're hucking 15-20 cliffs and the runout is maybe ten feet, don't get Juicys. If you ride lots of technical ST and love moderate to big hucks and jumps, Avids will fill the bill just fine.
    to each opinion there own right, the juicies are the stabbiest feeling breaks I have felt hands down. They will stop a small car. I'm not trying to pick on you, but I'm not quite sure how jumping and large drops have much to do with brakes. On a side note, a brake with better modulation will stop you faster then a over powerful brake such as the jucies IMO. think ABS.

    http://www.ridemonkey.com/forums/sho...ht=juicy+power
    http://www.ridemonkey.com/forums/sho...ht=juicy+power
    I agree with kidwoo here no doubt.
    http://www.ridemonkey.com/forums/sho...ghlight=brakes

    http://www.ridemonkey.com/forums/sho...ht=juicy+power
    pulsing/shuttering/power

    http://www.ridemonkey.com/forums/sho...&highlight=avi

    SRAM and the shuddering Juicy 7

    Best Alternate Rotors for Juicy

    Rotors that don't suck with Juicy 7's

    paging Juicy 7 owners (OT a little, sorry)

    Potential Juicy 7 solutions

    new pads/rotors to reduce noise on Juicy7s

    I think that's enough, if you do a search you'll find even more related to all of the problems I have listed, I am not just pulling things out of my ass. The shimano is a better system. The clean sweep rotor for the juicies is the best solution but does not solve the problems completely.

    Quote Originally Posted by intheways
    What about Saint brakes?
    The saint and xt share the same caliper, just different colors, same with the levers. same brake system

    Quote Originally Posted by whangen
    Sorry, don't have any experience with them, nor do I know anybody that has... maybe you should start a thread?

    I take that back, do know one guy... sez he likes them. Price is good for what you get but you do need shimano specific hubs (or I think you can buy an adapter for the rotor to go to 6 bolt IS, but thats just more money.) May need a special spline tool also... ie, more money. Don't know that for sure but that's the way the big S operates these days.
    Just order with 6 bolt rotors shimano does offer this, quite simple, no extra charge, no need to change hubs
    Last edited by Castle; 02-15-2006 at 11:25 AM.

  26. #26
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    Actually, my Gustavs cost 250 euro ($297) for the front, and 275 euro ($326) for the rear, with 7" rotors.
    8" rotors would've cost an extra 50 euro for each, and seeing as my Nomad is running up over $5k, my wallet is feeling the hurt.

    With the %16 VAT tax we pay, some things are just as expensive as back in the States....

    Anyways, back to the whole brake issue.... Sure, the Gustavs are very potent stoppers, but I'd rather have too much brake than not enough when I need it, and they modulate nice enough to keep my OTB adventures to a minimum.
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  27. #27
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    Got the Nomad

    Hi,

    Picked up my Nomad yesterday. No pics yet as I still have to fit the new 200mm rotors.

    However, I have built the bike as a long travel trail bike rather than an extreme freeride type cycle. I specced the basic float shock on it. I do, however, find this shock very active and "bobby". Anyone else find this or have I got the bike set up wrong?

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by starsky
    Hi,

    Picked up my Nomad yesterday. No pics yet as I still have to fit the new 200mm rotors.

    However, I have built the bike as a long travel trail bike rather than an extreme freeride type cycle. I specced the basic float shock on it. I do, however, find this shock very active and "bobby". Anyone else find this or have I got the bike set up wrong?
    Great, get us some pics ASAP. You must be walking (er, riding) two feet off the ground.

    I rode the Fox Float R for years, the one that had the lockout on it. I used the lockout all the time but then I'd blow the shims out and get it fixed then do it again. For good reason Fox phased that out for the stable platform/propedal concept.

    Anyhoo, I got the DHX now for a $150 uptick over the standard Fox shock and love it. I'm no expert but there's a 'pushed' version of your Fox shock that is around. Don't know about it but I hear it's more anti-bob going uphill. HOWEVER, If your shock is bobbing all the time, uphill and down, take it into a shop and have them show you how to set the "sag" (it's really somewhat complicated; I just learned it myself). Then adjust the rebound with 'curb test'. Roll over the curb and you should have it come back with just one cycle... one and a half at the most. Rebound about half way from "out' is a good starter. Oh yeah, I weigh 185 (196 with gear) and my LBS just set my main chamber at 250 lbs!!! Yeah, ya gotta do it. Makes all the difference on my shock. Remember tho, I've got the DHX so check the web for specs for your specific shock. Maybe add a little more to experiment. Good riding.
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  29. #29
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    Thanks for reading and annotating my posts so voluminously.

    Point taken on the contact point issue... that is not modulation and I didn't mean to imply it was. That's more where you like to engage the pads from a throw standpoint.

    However, all the rest you mention is personal experience and feel. I got em, I ride them (185mm/160mm)--- their quiet, except when really wet, they bring me down from speed (I go fast) safely and quickly without being grabby. They're cheap compared to the rest. Easy to set up. Parts are available everywhere. They come pre-bled and ready to rock. Yeah, they could use a new pad material... what brake can't! That's an ongoing process with all hydraulic brakes --- bring on nano technology. As far as Avid secretly working behind the scenes to save the day... that's all LBS heresy. Any Avid folks care to join this thread?!?

    What can I say... I like 'em.
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  30. #30
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    ***Crucial*** Avid Juicy 7 Setup Tips.

    Quote Originally Posted by starsky
    Picking up my new Nomad on Monday. For the time being I will be using the XT disc brakes off my Blur classic with 160mm rotors.

    I can't make up my mind on the brakes I want for this baby! My options are to upgrade the XT's to 203mm or buy new Juicy 5's with 185 / 185. The second option involves buying new shifters as my existing brakes are STI.

    I'm 225 lbs and ride aggressive XC. Any suggestions?
    Crucial Avid Juicy Seven Setup Tips.

    Good thread everybody! Thanks for all the research and efforts by all those involved, even those who hate Juicy Sevens and love to pound me.

    Topic: Most everyone is installing their Juicy Sevens wrong.

    Avid doesn't help cuz their instructions leave out several important setup issues. One is a manufacturing pre-condition which I'll discuss first. The second in an almost universal setup blunder, even by a lot of LBS's... and they should know better. 'Castle'... pay attention, this will be on the test!

    Avid mistakenly designed the '05 - 160mm rotor rim to be an 1/8" too far from the axle. The 185mm rotor is about 1/16" off depending on the fork or bosses. This causes the pads to rub the top of the rotor arms and produce the famous 'turkey gobble' . It's not necessarily accompanied by a squeal - that's usually a separate setup problem, discussed last. Avid is fixing the rotor designs and that is why the last year's models are selling for $129 or less a wheel.

    Our objective is to move the calipers outboard from the axle a tiny bit. The easy fix for the 160mm rotor is to slip TWO .04" thick washers (each a little thinner than a dime) on each bolt BETWEEN the supplied adaptor and the inner ball and cone combo. Four washers total.

    Usually the 185mm rotor takes one washer for each bolt depending on the fork or bosses. Follow Avids instruction for the rest of the setup (plus my extra setup technique below). Don't squeeze the levers with no disc or spacer in the caliper. The hard fix is to grind off an 1/8" or aforesaid bottom of the pad.. some do this, but why bother with each new set of pads you put in ?!?

    The second setup issue. When you go to tighten down the loose cone and ball parts, spin the wheel VERY slowly WITH THE CRANKS --- NOT BY ROTATING THE WHEEL BACKWARDS. Slowly apply a little more force to the lever and very gently stop the wheel rotating, making sure you used the cranks for this! This slow rotation of the wheel/rotor in the correct direction the wheel naturally travels helps wiggle out the spaces in the ball and cones and align the parts correctly. Don't go too fast. While keeping the lever moderately engaged, go to each of the two bolts and tighten one a little, then the other and so on back and forth. It's kinda like the early XT linear V-brakes and the toe-in issues regarding squealing. Fractions of a millimeter make all the difference.

    Okay here's the bad news, if you initially did the setup the wrong way or the way Avid advises and then rode your bike for a month or two, figuring to 'break 'em in and work out the squeals' you probably wore the pads unevenly. If so, toss 'em and start fresh cuz your old ones will make setup harder. Also, that's why your old setup sucked and you had bad modulation and noise. Constant squealing and grabbing tell me (when I'm on the trail) that someone did a bad setup on their Avids. I guarantee you'll love the results if you follow my simple tips. By the way, if it's wet, all disc brake squeal and squawk a little.

    X-factor levers? Who cares. If the Sevens are setup right you don't have to be ham-fisted with the levers; one forefinger will do the trick, even in the most dire circumstance. If you prefer, scratch up the smooth blade area under your fingerpad a little with rough sandpaper.

    You'll love the results if you follow my simple tips. Good modulation and powerful one-finger stops can be yours. Now, go grab some of those dirt cheap '05 Juicy Sevens before everyone figures this out.

    Little known fact: Behind the lever blade, up near the brake body, is a small indentation --- your travel coffee mug's handle will hang there quite nicely while riding to the coffee shop.
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  31. #31
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    New question here.

    Quote Originally Posted by whangen
    Avid doesn't help cuz their instructions leave out several important setup issues. One is a manufacturing pre-condition which I'll discuss first. The second in an almost universal setup blunder, even by a lot of LBS's... and they should know better. 'Castle'... pay attention, this will be on the test!

    Avid mistakenly designed the '05 - 160mm rotor rim to be an 1/8" too far from the axle.
    Sooo... Does this mean the '06 Juicys are fixed?
    - -benja- -

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    it does it on 203mm rotors as well... check it out... second tip was recommended on the bb7's as well a few years back.... some people complained that when they were tighten the bolts they would move/rock. I haven't ran into that, I think the alignment on both of their brake systems are great.

    good stuff!
    Last edited by Castle; 02-16-2006 at 06:40 PM.

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    Depends who you talk to....

    Quote Originally Posted by benja55
    Sooo... Does this mean the '06 Juicys are fixed?
    Some say yes and some say no. Some of the blame I think is in sloppy brake bosses on the bikes being built. Avid takes a hit for that.

    My setup tips are mostly for the wavy type rotor found on the deeply discounted '05 models... I suspect my washer idea will work on the round replacement rotors Avid shipped in desperation and didn't solve anything for a lot of people..

    Here's how to figure if you need the washers. Do an initial install, no washers. Ride a few minutes and see where the rub lines are. I like mine to be (on the wavys) a tiny bit below the innermost hole in the rotor. The objective is to move the caliper away from the axle the right amount so you're off the arms. You'll see an immediate improvement... no wearing in needed anymore.
    RAIL OR F*!%#!*^G BAIL

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bombardier
    Actually, my Gustavs cost 250 euro ($297) for the front, and 275 euro ($326) for the rear, with 7" rotors.
    Mine where 380€ with big rotors (8 + 7) and all the tiny stuff you need to set them up like washers. I allway looking to get pricey stuff as cheap as i can and spend much time on it. Here's the result:
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Nomad set up

    I eventually went with Juicy 5s with 185mm rotors front and rear.

    I really really hate to say this but my first two rides on the Nomad yesterday and today were awful! I just can't get the bike set up as I would like and I'm not "connecting" with the bike if you know what I mean.

    Spent the entire ride today wishing I had my Blur back!

  36. #36
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    New Nomad

    Here it is. First attempt at inserting images

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    Didn't work


  38. #38
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    Sweet looking bike...

    Quote Originally Posted by skuehnen
    Mine where 380€ with big rotors (8 + 7) and all the tiny stuff you need to set them up like washers. I allway looking to get pricey stuff as cheap as i can and spend much time on it. Here's the result:
    Shhwweeettt... great looking bike. All black works good on the Nomad. Makes it look bad-ass.

    I'm a little jealous cuz you got the word and logo 'Nomad' painted on your top tube. Mine was two cheapo stickers on the chainstays which rubbed off on the first ride! Shame on Santa Cruz Bicycles. I know where Rob, the boss, gets his morning coffee... I'm gonna go yell at him.

    Keep us updated on those Gustav's.
    RAIL OR F*!%#!*^G BAIL

  39. #39
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    Wrong setup - Need new thread!

    Quote Originally Posted by starsky
    I eventually went with Juicy 5s with 185mm rotors front and rear.

    I really really hate to say this but my first two rides on the Nomad yesterday and today were awful! I just can't get the bike set up as I would like and I'm not "connecting" with the bike if you know what I mean.

    Spent the entire ride today wishing I had my Blur back!
    Same here --- or a least till I learned how to set the shock, sag, frame etc. These Nomads DAMNED HARD to dial. Even most shop guys are confused about this and SC Bicycles is just now getting a belated grip on tuning.

    I've got some of the latest info from SC Bicycles and that a few local Santa Cruz tech types, plus have learned a lot in the last few days on my own Nomad. The good news is if you get it into the NARROW SWEET SPOT you are in for the GREATEST RIDE AROUND!!!

    Don't give up. I'm goin to start a tech thread on Nomad setup as soon as I get my notes together and call a few SC people to doublecheck my facts. Probably be two to three more days. Stay tuned.
    RAIL OR F*!%#!*^G BAIL

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    That would be great!

    I think I will spend about a month tweaking it myself and If I am still not getting on with it I will bring it back to the shop for some set up help.

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    skuehnen, where are you riding at?

    I got a deal on my Magura setup because I'm also getting a whole bunch of other stuff from the LBS that's building it for me.....

    The only thing left is my tire selection.... I've been planning on getting some Big Bettys, but I like my old Continental Vapors a lot, so I might go with the large version of those.
    Bombardier :::: MCM #249

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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! Can't wait to read the notes!

    Quote Originally Posted by whangen
    I'm goin to start a tech thread on Nomad setup as soon as I get my notes together and call a few SC people to doublecheck my facts. Probably be two to three more days. Stay tuned.
    I'm days away from starting my Nomad build and I'd love to read your notes, ideas and thoughts on setup. I'm actually looking forward to getting this bike dialed in and don't have any illusions about just hopping on it w/o a healthy dose of tweaking. Between the DHXair on the back and the 66SL on the front I'm gonna have my hands full.
    - -benja- -

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bombardier
    skuehnen, where are you riding at?
    I live in Karlsruhe, Germany and we have a bikepark at Bad Wildbad and there are some steep rocky technical trails near Bad Herrenalb called Teufelsloch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bombardier
    The only thing left is my tire selection.... I've been planning on getting some Big Bettys, but I like my old Continental Vapors a lot, so I might go with the large version of those.
    I think the Betties are the way to go with a bike like the Nomad. I'd really like to put them on but i dare to through away my Fat Alberts, which are still in good shape.

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    XT 4-pods rock!

    Quote Originally Posted by PizzaMan
    I understand you have the new XT brakes.
    Do you know the old XT version ? (4 piston ?)
    I think those are still one of the best systems available. They can be found pretty cheap these days, are super reliable, and have plenty of stopping power & good modulation.
    I know I'm getting one of these for my Nomad.
    I totally agree with you on the XT-4pods disc brakes, modulation is sweet. But they're very rare over here in Singapore. Shimano discontinued this model and they can no longer be found in the local LBS. Luckily, I just bought myself a used set a week back, can't wait to set it up on my new SL ... sorry guys, I know everyone's railing about a Nomad but here I am still on a SL.

    Hey Starsky, you can run 'em SRAM rocket shifters with Shimano rear-dees. That's the setup I have currently. It's a proven combi that works very well (STI sux ), but you won't be able to use them SRAM XO shifters though.

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