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  1. #1
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    Bottoming new fox fork and shock on tallboy

    Got my new 2013 tallboy C with Fox CTD TA both ends. It's around 20% sag. I notice that I bottom out both ends more than I need to. This is a revelation since I was never able to bottom a fox fork before.

    It may be that I am used to more travel and ride the bike more than its intended to. But it's kind of annoying. Small drops to flat bottom both ends and a good bunny hop goes through a lot of the travel. The CTD position makes no difference in bottoming (it does affect the ride, but not this aspect).

    Now what? Live with it? Should I have gone for LT (I like the standard better)?

  2. #2
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    you need another bike. the tallboy is a fast all day trail ripper not a bomber. a little more compression dampening would slow it down. but the ride would be a little harsher.
    besides one bike is never enough

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by kidd View Post
    you need another bike. the tallboy is a fast all day trail ripper not a bomber. a little more compression dampening would slow it down. but the ride would be a little harsher.
    besides one bike is never enough
    I disagree. I've seen people ride TB1s in the bike park. Granted, they're not hucking to flat or anything, but the TB is a very capable bike and a bunny hop should not blow through the travel (unless your a clyde). This to me sounds like an issue with the shock setup. I'd start playing around with the sag first. Maybe bump up the PSI a touch.

    It may also be worth cracking open the fork for a fluid change. Fox is notorious for being underfilled from the factory.
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  4. #4
    Ted
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    Aren't you supposed to use your suspension travel when hopping and dropping?

  5. #5
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    I have ridden my TBc all over Moab, Fruita, Grand Junction and the Fox fork rarely bottomed out but the rear shock did. If you need more mid stroke compression Push Ind. does a great job of fixing the shock. If you are doing lots of jumps or drops to flat then maybe you should have gone for the LT. I switched up to the LTc and its way more jump friendly IMO.

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    100mm are good enough for XC and mild trial use but not for anything too hard.

  7. #7
    007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paris Galanis View Post
    100mm are good enough for XC and mild trial use but not for anything too hard.
    This is also not true. Rider skill is an equally, if not more, important variable.
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  8. #8
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    [QUOTE

    Now what? Live with it? Should I have gone for LT (I like the standard better)?[/QUOTE]

    Short travel means you'll be using all of it on drops and bigger hits if you have it set up for trail riding comfort/plush.
    Not necessarily a bad thing, the bike and suspension can handle it, but the reality is that once you're 20%+ in to the travel, there's not a whole lot left.
    If it's happening on every ride and bugging you, you may need to alter your riding style, get some suspension tuning done, or just learn to accept it.
    Just adding PSI may not be the right answer if it doesn't produce the suspension feel you are looking for.
    You can easily tweak the shock with spacers. Cheap and easy to do. Try that first:
    Changing 2013 FLOAT CTD Air Spring Compression Ratios

  9. #9
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    Those travel spacers sound promising. Are there spacers for the fork as well? I guess in the front you can just add oil.

    Did anyone try the spacers? What size and how did it work?

    Do you know if the shock on those bikes is regular can or large volume? I don't know why they spec the shocks with low compression tune.

  10. #10
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    Lower compression base tunes are what work best with many of SC's VPP bikes.
    Mid/Higher compression tunes can make the bike feel harsh and choppy, but it comes down to rider preference.
    You can adjust your shock's low speed compression with the CTD switch. The Trail Adjust version allows for 3 levels of low speed compression fine tuning in the Trail mode.
    If you have a boost valve on yours-you should, that can be tuned as well. Needs to go to the factory or a tuner, but they can up the boost valve pressure. Big improvements can be had there.
    The new heads on the 2013 CTD shocks provide for increased air volume with the skinnier can.
    The chart in the prior post lays out the range of spacers that are applicable to each shock.
    For the fork, you can add Float Fluid on top of the air spring, but that's a stop gap/hack method that can limit travel before you get the feel you like. No harm done though to add a little to see if you like the difference.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by 007 View Post
    This is also not true. Rider skill is an equally, if not more, important variable.
    It is just common sense unfortunately. A 100mm suspension will bottom out easier compared to a similar 130mm that will also bottom out easier than a similar 160 etc under the same conditions. On the other hand low travel bicycles have their own benefits so it really comes down to what we expect from each bicycle.

  12. #12
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    Do you guys know the can size? Its a factor in ordering the spacers. Mine is the standard shock that comes with the bike.

  13. #13
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    Pretty sure the stock option is the SV eyelet and air can.
    2013 FLOAT Large Volume (LV) Air Sleeve and Eyelet

    The 2013 LV eyelet diameter is larger than the SV eyelet diameter.

    However, eyelet size and can size shouldn't matter for purchase of the kit. You need the 2013 Float CTD Spacer Kit. 803-00-802
    Fox Shox Float CTD Air Volume Spacer/Reducer Kit

    Eyelet size sv/xv/lv only matters in what combo of spacers you can employ. They all come in the kit.

    However, you should check to see if there is a spacer in your shock already to see how much adjustability the kit may give you. I don't know what the stock spacer(if any) SC had installed on the Tallboy shocks. The Fox link above gives the factory directions for opening up the shock.

    Here's how to check for a spacer with the shock still on the bike if you don't want to remove the shock:
    Tech Tuesday - How to Install a Fox Float Air-Volume Spacer - Pinkbike

  14. #14
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    Update:
    Got the volume spacer kits and put the small spacer in the shock (kit has 3 sizes). Best dollars I spent on this bike. Installation was 5 min with the shock on the bike, most of which were cleaning so I don't get dirt inside when I open the shock.

    Test ride today in skeggs, which is probably not the best test because it's a flowy single track with very little air time and minor rock gardens. Setup same as before, 20% sag and a couple rebound clicks in.
    Best feature: Descend mode is now usable. I used it a lot today and its great. Got max travel ~85% which is what you can expect on Skeggs, including a few tiny airs, like one feet or less.
    Trail mode: also good. I use it less because now descend is a viable option.
    Climb mode: just a little better. The bike bobs like a good old VPP. Not the shocks fault really. Got maybe 40% travel on fire road and smooth singletrack seated climbs.

    It's the first ride where the travel oring stayed on the shock the entire ride. The shock seems much plusher, I never felt it kicking me or the dreadful bottom out.

    Now this only highlights the shortcoming of the fork even more. I closed it a few times, one of which sent me to the bushes.

  15. #15
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    Thanks for the suggestion by the way.

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    ...
    Last edited by CrozCountry; 03-10-2014 at 02:05 AM.

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