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  1. #1
    Get Down Do you
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    Blur LT follow up ride report/review (long)

    I had a bit of time traveling recently so I decided to write a ride report on the Blur LT.

    Build
    Blur LT medium Orange Ano
    07 Avid Juicy 7s 160mm F/R
    Hope pro2 hubs laced to DT Swiss 4.2Ds (1740 grams)
    Fox Talas RLC 07
    Fox Float RP23
    Thompson elite seat post
    Thompson X4 Stem 90mm 0 rise
    Specialized XC riser bar (what can I say I still like it feels, will be changing it soon though)
    07 SRAM X9 front/rear
    XT Cranks/BB
    Kenda Nevegal 2.10
    ODI Rogue Lock ons

    Weight 27.5lbs (I could shave weight easily but this bike is solid)


    Rider
    5’7” 175lbs with a full pack. I am definitely on the small side for a medium but my longer torso fits the medium frame perfectly even if the stand over left me singing soprano.

    Setup
    It took me a little while to get the blur Dialed in perfectly. I wound up going a little bit on the plush side for sag numbers and going for feel so I could get a perfectly balanced ride. The Talas I put 70psi with 4 clicks of compression, 8clicks of rebound and the Lock out blow off 3 clicks from min (not that I have ever used the fork lock out). The RP23 I set at 150psi and set the Propedal to 2.

    Ride
    My 1st impression was honestly WOW. My last bike was a 05 Stump Jumper FSR and I used quite regularly a turner 5spot and intense 5.5 (shop demos that I would use all the time.) After getting the bike dialed in I was pleasantly surprised on how easily a bike with over 5” of travel front and rear climbed. I was able to clear obstacles and ups that would cause my old bikes to squat and front end waggle. The bike tracked very well and there was no sign of front end lift it was basically point and shoot. On hard technical climbs I actually never use the ProPedal opting rather to have the rear end soak up all the bumps and rocks. But even without ProPedal the VPP does an excellent job of isolating the pedal bob and just let me crank out the miles.

    I did find myself using the ProPedal on very long smooth ups and fire roads. Even with the propedal on the bike would soak up bumps nicely and it’s amazing how much better the RP23 is over the old RP3. When PP is active you will actually feel the bike riding a bit higher in the sag range, it’s almost as if you are lifted 5-10mm up it’s very noticeable but not awkward, and there is NO pedal bob at all. On more than one occasion I would forget to turn off the PP and the ride was never harsh nor did I get bounced off the seat on the little stuff. PP coupled with the VPP really lets you stand and hammer and use a couple gears higher than you would without. It is really that efficient. . Fox really did their homework with the RP23. The RP23 is on par with a Pushed rp3 not better but easily par.

    Steering was always precise and spot on especially considering the 140mm fork up front. I could definitely tell that this was designed to take up to 160mm front fork because the 140mm steers like an XC racer. But thankfully not twitchy just fast and precise. I actually went from a 90mm stem with a 6degree rise to a 90mm zero degree rise and I have to say I can feel the difference and the steering slowed a tad but it’s still spot on, Look, point, shoot!

    Now my favorite part. The downs! This bike is amazing on long steep technical downs. It allows you to keep your line and just worry about the trail ahead not the obstacles. The Talas up front, as usual, does an impeccable job of soaking up the hits yet I experienced zero brake dive. The more upright seating position of the LT really gives you the confidence to attack trails. This bike also loves tight single track. Yes I said it a 5inch plus travel bike loves it tight. You can dive into corners with the highest confidence and the bike just tracks like it’s on rails. Now for the rear of the bike on the downs. I have had the opportunity to run both the DHX-A 5.0 and the RP23 on the rear of the bike but since I opted for the RP23 I will mostly use it as a reference in the review. The rear remained very supple on the downs, although big hits would make the RP23 sometimes sound like a dying accordion when it blew off air, it would be fine and use all its travel without bottoming out. The bike would always track well in the rear and would never squat or jerk you around. I found myself riding the same trails faster and smoother than I ever did before. Although the DHX-A 5.0 does feel more linear and supple especially on full downs the mostly XC oriented trails that I ride because of proximity didn’t warrant having one full time. I may change my mind when I get my hands on the 08 DHX-A with it’s nice little off and on PP switch.

    I have done several 4ft to flat and 5ft to tranny drops with the bike and it handles them without a hiccup. I have not gone any bigger but I really feel the bike would handle a little bigger without issue.

    I have been riding the bike for over 4months now and I have yet to experience the notorious rear end squeak/creak. And none of the VPP bikes that have come into the shop have had it so we are either very lucky or as I suspected it’s a very specific issue to only certain bikes.

    Some things I may change about the setup would be going with a shorter 70 or 80mm stem for some of my full on DH runs to put me in the sweet spot and possibly go to a DHX-A 5.0 2008 model again for more of the DH rides that I tend to do over the summer. But I really have to say that the RP23 is quiet capable. I am also debating going to a Float or Vanilla over the Talas for a little weight loss and plushness. I really have yet to find anywhere that I need to lower the front of the bike.

    I have yet to feel the “chain growth” or “loss of power” that others have claimed are inherent with the VPP suspension. It may be there but I have not noticed it at all.

    Last edited by Muggsly; 06-17-2007 at 07:45 AM. Reason: Changed title
    Progression is fine just remember to respect your roots.

  2. #2
    Down South Yooper
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    I agree

    I have been breaking in my new Large LT Black ano, and since I transferred all the parts over from my classic, I'm working with a TALAS that only grows to 125mm, and the steering is very quick, moving towards nervous. I'm getting used to it, but it has been a little unnerving the first couple of rides. It's not so bad that I'm urgenly looking for a 140 to replace it with, but I would pick one up if it came along..

    Other than that, the bike rides great, I have a little bit of a creak, but I haven't checked my BB cups since the install, so I'm hoping that is where it's coming from. I did the antiseize on the upper linkage points, per recommendations from this board, but didn't bother with the bottom links (I had to install my shock, so the uppers were apart anyway..).

    Just make sure you're in the sweet spot for suspension sag, and it should ride like a dream.

    Plum
    This post is in 3B, three beers and it looks good eh!

  3. #3
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    Great write up Muggsly. I would have to agree with almost everything you have said. My only complaint is lack of clearence for a 2.3 tire in the rear.

    Plum I was riding a 125 talas initially too and I recently upgraded to a new Float 140mm and the bike is really in the zone now. If you can find one cheap get one.

    I have yet to get any creek in my bike either.

  4. #4
    TC
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    Kenda Nevegal DH 2.5 fit (just barely) on rear for me. a few pebbles will flick and catch now and then, but other than heavy mud (for which I would switch back to 2.35 nevy), I don't think I'll have clearance issues. this thing HANDLES with these meats!

  5. #5
    The Road Warrior
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    That's a cool color... can't wait to get mine.

  6. #6
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    Muggsly, I see you didn't go with those I9's. Any reason why, other than price? I know those Hope bulb hubs are SOLID, and so is the dt stuff, so congrats! Very nice bike, my man. I love my talas @ 120, but thats on my stumpy. Try it on the dh, I love the way it handles more than the 140

  7. #7
    The Road Warrior
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    I was curious if there was any reason you went with a Talas instead of a Float?

  8. #8
    Get Down Do you
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpy_Steve
    Muggsly, I see you didn't go with those I9's. Any reason why, other than price? I know those Hope bulb hubs are SOLID, and so is the dt stuff, so congrats! Very nice bike, my man. I love my talas @ 120, but thats on my stumpy. Try it on the dh, I love the way it handles more than the 140

    The price was the major issue at the current time especially considering I am closing on a new house and I just finished the build on this bike. Plus we have an identical set of i9s in the shop and my hopes are only 100grams heavier. I may still go with i9s later on down the road for the "bling" factor but I am very very impressed with my hopes laced to my 4.2ds. Also I wanted great wheels "now" and I didn't want to wait for the custom color turn around time on i9s.

    As to the stumpy at 120 I always felt that my stumpy handled best at that travel too. Actually since I had the older crank down talas I would ride mine at 121mm or 124mm. Because the stumpy always felt more balanced to me that way. The LT steers faster at 140mm then my Stumpy did at 120mm.

    Quote Originally Posted by Landspeed
    I was curious if there was any reason you went with a Talas instead of a Float?
    To be honest I went with what I knew. And my last bikes needed to be cranked down to get to the great DH trails and to help with the technical climbs. So I assumed that I would need it too with the LT. It turned out that the LT was a capable enough climber at full travel that I never used travel adjustment. I may be selling this talas when the 08 Forks are released and get an 08 float. Especially considering all the great things I heard about the improved dampening on the 08 fox forks.
    Progression is fine just remember to respect your roots.

  9. #9
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    Geta Van! Unless weight is important. Damn, Im waiting for an excuse to get one...

  10. #10
    Get Down Do you
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpy_Steve
    Geta Van! Unless weight is important. Damn, Im waiting for an excuse to get one...

    Mmmmm coil fork *drool*

    If and when I build a nomad it's going to be coil/coil. I may be getting a jackal frame so I might use Coil there too. The LT I want to keep light and I am happy with it's weight right now. Not that the van is that much heavier if I remember correctly it's somewhere around .09kg difference between the 2 forks.
    Progression is fine just remember to respect your roots.

  11. #11
    nerfherder
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    Great write up Muggs. Thanks for taking the time.

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