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  1. #1
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    36 + Nomad choices

    I have just bought a Nomad and don't really like the fork I bought with it ( a UK fork I got cheap!)

    I was thinking of switching to a Fox 36. The TALAS 36 looks nice for the general trail riding I do. I'm more xc than freerider or downhiller but I would liek to develop a more aggressive style.

    I would like to be able to ride UP as well as down the hills. What forks are you guys using on your Nomads and what are the results like?

  2. #2
    aka baycat
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    Marz 66 SL
    All Mountain 1
    Fox Vanilla 36

  3. #3
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    Vanilla

    I had the vanilla recommended with the Ti spring upgrade for my weight. There's no travel adjust or lock down on that fork though?

  4. #4
    aka baycat
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    Isnt there some crazy light Pace fork, seen a pic of it

  5. #5
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    That's mine

    Quote Originally Posted by baycat
    Isnt there some crazy light Pace fork, seen a pic of it

    That's the fork I have on my bike!

    Not getting on with it though!

  6. #6
    TNC
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    Vanilla and Nomad.

    Quote Originally Posted by starsky
    I had the vanilla recommended with the Ti spring upgrade for my weight. There's no travel adjust or lock down on that fork though?
    Personally I've always felt travel reduction is highly overrated, but some really like it. The Van 36 is a perfect match to the Nomad. The Nomad's front wheel doesn't hunt or wander when climbing with it, and it never feels too tall IMO. Remember that this is a Nomad, not a real XC bike. Put a good, burly fork on it that doesn't weigh a ton, and you'll probably be happier in the long run.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
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    I really like my Marzo AllMountain1. It's lighter then the Fox Van and even if you don't use the ETA often, when you do use it then it's an on the fly on/off type that is really appreciated. Specially if you do some long XC type climbs. It has the Marzo coil plushness and it will not penalize you if you grow into more aggressive stuff, specially if you are a light rider. I guess for a heavy and aggressive rider it may not be ideal because it doesn't have the big hub option.

  8. #8
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    The following is Scott Turner's advice on the recommended fork travel for the Nomad.

    [COLOR=RoyalBlue]The Nomad frame is designed for forks from 130mm to 180mm.
    125-130mm is good for those that want a quicker feeling "XC" ride.
    150-160mm is for average use and all around trail riding.
    175-180mm is for those that ride aggressive terrain, and want all the travel possible

    All geometry measurements on the Nomad section of our website are measured based on an average 6" travel fork - 520mm axle to crown.[/
    COLOR]

    He didn't exactly recommend any particular fork, that's because I was kind of more interested in the amount of front travel. From the forum, it seems that a lot of people out there are using a Fox 36, that sure says a lot and you're unlikely to go wrong with that. Hope this little bit of info helps. Cheers.

  9. #9
    TNC
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    Hate to question "the man", but...

    Quote Originally Posted by kevinox73
    The following is Scott Turner's advice on the recommended fork travel for the Nomad.

    [COLOR=RoyalBlue]The Nomad frame is designed for forks from 130mm to 180mm.
    125-130mm is good for those that want a quicker feeling "XC" ride.
    150-160mm is for average use and all around trail riding.
    175-180mm is for those that ride aggressive terrain, and want all the travel possible

    All geometry measurements on the Nomad section of our website are measured based on an average 6" travel fork - 520mm axle to crown.[/
    COLOR]

    He didn't exactly recommend any particular fork, that's because I was kind of more interested in the amount of front travel. From the forum, it seems that a lot of people out there are using a Fox 36, that sure says a lot and you're unlikely to go wrong with that. Hope this little bit of info helps. Cheers.
    I challenge anyone to run a 125-130mm fork on a Nomad on anything but flat ground. By "flat ground", I mean a trail or surface that has no rocks or any other protrusions that bring the pedals closer to the ground than what the tires are rolling on. On the other hand, I guess you could increase pressure in the rear air shock or get a really high spring rate on your rear coil to keep the BB a little higher...LOL!...but wouldn't that be a sweet handling ride? Bullits were able to able to get away with 5" forks because they had a fairly high BB and a moveable shuttle to play with for fine tuning.

    Don't get me wrong. I love my Nomad. I went for a great ride this evening on it. However, I think most people are going to be miserable with anything less than a 6" fork because of pedal smacking. Personally, even with a Van 36 on mine, I found the pedal smacking to be fairly annoying. I've even installed one of my 170mm cranksets to help some more in this area. This evening's ride was even better because of the crank change. I can pedal more aggressively when leaned over in a corner now also. This thing eats up rocks and corners like an F1 car. I really like this bike, but I want people to know there may be a serious downside when running a short fork. On another note, why even buy a Nomad to install a 5" fork on it?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    I challenge anyone to run a 125-130mm fork on a Nomad on anything but flat ground. By "flat ground", I mean a trail or surface that has no rocks or any other protrusions that bring the pedals closer to the ground than what the tires are rolling on. On the other hand, I guess you could increase pressure in the rear air shock or get a really high spring rate on your rear coil to keep the BB a little higher...LOL!...but wouldn't that be a sweet handling ride? Bullits were able to able to get away with 5" forks because they had a fairly high BB and a moveable shuttle to play with for fine tuning.

    Don't get me wrong. I love my Nomad. I went for a great ride this evening on it. However, I think most people are going to be miserable with anything less than a 6" fork because of pedal smacking. Personally, even with a Van 36 on mine, I found the pedal smacking to be fairly annoying. I've even installed one of my 170mm cranksets to help some more in this area. This evening's ride was even better because of the crank change. I can pedal more aggressively when leaned over in a corner now also. This thing eats up rocks and corners like an F1 car. I really like this bike, but I want people to know there may be a serious downside when running a short fork. On another note, why even buy a Nomad to install a 5" fork on it?
    I would agree with you on all counts, I'm actually not encouraging anyone to run a 5" fork. It doesn't make sense to run it with such short travel, would not do the Nomad any justice.

  11. #11
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    I installed a Pike 454 U turn 140 mm on my Nomad, rode it for one ride and had pedal smacking problems with it. took it back to the LBS and they gave me my money back and they installed Van Rc36 problem all sorted. My nomad is large frame and i weigh about 190lbs 150mm is the mininum for this bike IMHO.

    John

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Profit
    I installed a Pike 454 U turn 140 mm on my Nomad, rode it for one ride and had pedal smacking problems with it. took it back to the LBS and they gave me my money back and they installed Van Rc36 problem all sorted. My nomad is large frame and i weigh about 190lbs 150mm is the mininum for this bike IMHO.

    John

    What rear shock are you running?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    This thing eats up rocks and corners like an F1 car.
    Ho stop that TNC, I can't wait to jump on mine and you add to my misery with those comments!

  14. #14
    TNC
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    LOL! Funny thing...

    Quote Originally Posted by BanzaiRider
    Ho stop that TNC, I can't wait to jump on mine and you add to my misery with those comments!
    Yesterday I was riding with a buddy that I've been riding our local trail with frequently lately. I've mainly been riding the Nomad by myself since getting it built. I could tell the Nomad was more efficient than the Bullit, but yesterday when riding with someone who usually goes about the same speed as me, I had one of those revealations you get sometimes that really points out a performance advantage in a piece of equipment or the whole bike. Even though I was getting over a multiday cold episode, I literally ran off and left my buddy, especially when I hit rocky, technical sections. My friend commented how he could tell that I went through some of our more technical areas a whole lot faster and opened up distance between us in a way he hadn't seen before. We ride this trail so regularly, and we both have built and maintain sections of this trail, so we know this place like a test track. Yesterday's experience while actually riding with someone who also knows this trail well was just one of those times that you realize an increased performance from the bike you're on that has nothing to do with how you felt, being "in the zone", or other non-mechanical factors.

    This Nomad is a very good bike. The rear suspension design is pretty darned awesome. The geometry and rear end design is where the magic is taking place, because I had all these same components, including the Van 36, on the '03 Bullit. It's still crazy that this bike climbs so well with a 50mm stem and 1" setback seatpost. It's an extremely well balanced bike that allows a lot more DH oriented setup as it pertains to cockpit position and layout but still allows it to carve corners, negotiate tight spots, and climb with great efficiency. Crap...I sound like an SC commercial, but I'm that stoked about how well this bike is turning out.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by daisycutter
    What rear shock are you running?
    Fox DXH Air 5.0 fantastic bit of kit, the rear end is so plush and with the VPP no bob

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by starsky
    I have just bought a Nomad and don't really like the fork I bought with it ( a UK fork I got cheap!)

    I was thinking of switching to a Fox 36. The TALAS 36 looks nice for the general trail riding I do. I'm more xc than freerider or downhiller but I would liek to develop a more aggressive style.

    I would like to be able to ride UP as well as down the hills. What forks are you guys using on your Nomads and what are the results like?
    Starsky; pm me if you're interested in a 05 Fox 36RC2, mine was just completely serviced by Fox-it's like new.
    turtle

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    ...I had one of those revealations you get sometimes that really points out a performance advantage in a piece of equipment or the whole bike. Even though I was getting over a multiday cold episode, I literally ran off and left my buddy, especially when I hit rocky, technical sections....
    Hummm, I always suspected it, drugs! That's it, you've been taking drugs for your cold and you try to have people believe that a mere bike frame could completely change the face of your riding performance. What a cheater! It's not the Nomad people, it's drugs... You should be a shame of yourself TNC, starting drugs at your age! mouahahahahaha

    Boy am I gonna get it in a few weeks when I start posting about my performance with the Nomad!

  18. #18
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    My Nomad is outfitted with a Fox36 talas RC2. At first I did not reduce travel for climbs... I have been riding big travel bikes/forks for years and felt great climbing with the Nomad with the fork in 6" mode. Recently, I tried it with the fork brought down to 5" even 4" for extended climbing. It felt like a xc rig in 4" mode. Super comfortable climbing in 4" mode. The climb I really enjoyed lowering the fork are for 1 hour plus climbs especially on technical single track that have alot of step ups on. If the climb is interupted with some fun downhills, I prefer to leave it in 6" mode so I can really enjoy the descents. I fitted my Nomad with a gravity dropper seat post and can drop the seat with a thumb trigger. Great for trails that are up and down. I got the bike for trail riding and not for freeride or DH specifically....I do find the talas 36 bottoms out easily on drops though so if you are pretty aggressive you might think of another fork.

  19. #19
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    I am not the most experience rider, but I do like my Marzocchi Z1 FR1 ETA (2005 model) in the front. The best part is that you can get it fairly cheap on sales almost anywhere. For some reason I have not seen a lot of reviews regarding the FR1 on the Nomad, is there any reason for that? On the other hand, there seems to be a lot of happy riders out there with the Fox.

  20. #20
    TNC
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    The FR1 is a great fork. It may that the newer generation of "big stanchion" forks like the 36 and 66 series are getting all the attention. I've never thought of the 32mm Marz forks as being wimpy. For the money, they may be the best performing fork out there. There's a very small margin of rigidity that can be felt through the legs of a 36mm fork over the 32's, but at least compared to the Z1 series, it's not really a night and day sort of thing IMHO. I went with a Van 36 because it's not that much heavier than the Z1FR1 while giving maximum rigidity. I still have a pair of modified Z150SL models on my Bullits, and they're not going anywhere...though I have some lust for a 66SL lurking in the future.

  21. #21
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    ... and if we just ... FR1 and Nomad

    I thought I had the only Nomad with a FR1 MAR fork!

    Seriously though, I have little experience with long travel forks. What I have noticed on climbs it seems glued to the trail. I'm relatively happy with it. It does seems heavy when compared to my "5" Talas. Granted, I'm one of those guys that will always wonder if there is something better out there. This is a personality trait has caused me much grief and dollars. For example, my Trek Liquid came with a Manitou Super 120, I knew I had to have an upgrade. So I spent $600 for a Fox Talas 130 and to be honest I realized little difference. Am I missing something? Was I born without the mountain bike supension gene? Anyway, for now I'm keeping what I have and will try to resist the urge to upgrade. Well for now anyway.

    Mean Gene
    What's that smell???

  22. #22
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    Getting Somewhere

    I am starting to get somewhere with my set up woes!!!

    Turns out the Float R was leaking air from the positive chamber into the negative chamber. The UK distributor revalved and stiffened the shock generally for me. Hopefully the rear end will now be OK.

    I am also going to drop some of the spacers below the stem as the front feels very high.

    Turtle YGM.

    I have to say I learned on my Blur that I like the suspension remaining active on climbs. The front end bounces all over the place when locked out.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mean gene
    Granted, I'm one of those guys that will always wonder if there is something better out there. This is a personality trait has caused me much grief and dollars.
    WHAT! I thought I was the only one like that you m... b...

  24. #24
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Nomad or never

    Quote Originally Posted by BanzaiRider
    WHAT! I thought I was the only one like that you m... b...

    Hey BanzaiRider,

    When will you become "NomadRider"???

    mean gene
    What's that smell???

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mean gene
    Hey BanzaiRider,

    When will you become "NomadRider"???

    mean gene
    Well I've decided to stay BanzaiRider. I've made so many enemies over time with that name that if I change it my enemies might be confused and take me for a friend! Anyway, the Banzai is not really a very well know frame model so it's not like if my name was HecklerRider! haha So long cowboy! Cheers.

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