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  1. #1
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    05 Bullit with Totems?

    I recently bought a 2nd hand Bullit ... it was built up with XC gear! I saved up for a Totem, borrowed a mate's front wheel, and today rode it for the first time. The bike feels great in the air, is a blast going downhill. A step up from my stumpjumper for sure. But I'm dissapointed to find the single track experience was ... like hard work. The steering seems so sluggish! It's like there's feedback up to a point, and then suddenly there's no feel or resistance and the wheel just wants to keep turning.

    From googling for pics, I guess it's an '05 frame.
    (There's a pic of the bike in the condition I bought it here: http://perthmtb.com/files/P3110001_med.JPG )
    Can anyone tell me what travel that frame was built around? I'm wondering if this fork is too long for this frame, and I have too slack of a head angle and resultant sluggish feel.

    I'm also wondering about the mounting of the rear shock; does anyone know if there's any adjustments that can be made - with a resultant change in head angle? From searching around, I've come across mention of a "shuttle" that can go in a couple of positions. I can't quite see how that would work on my frame, although it looks like it might be able to be flipped upside down. (Assuming the "shuttle" is the small piece that connects the shock to the frame, at the front.)

    Any feedback greatly appreciated, before I take the Totem back to the lbs to have it shortened...

  2. #2
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    The bike was designed to run up to 180mm fork so you are not over that. The bike is going to be slacked out with a 180mm fork. I know mine was when I had a 170mm Shiver on it.

    Try moving the rear shock shuttle to the steep position(it has 2 sets of holes in it). This will help make steepen the head angle.

    Other than that, ride it somemore....you will get used to it and. After one ride is not a good indicator of how it will truely ride once you get used to how it feels.

  3. #3
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    Yeah, I take your point about needing more time in the saddle. I was kind of hoping it might just be "something I need to get used to" - and in fact I rode it again today and experienced moments of, well, 'smoothness' I guess you could say.

    Regarding the 'rear shock shuttle' - it does indeed have 2 sets of holes in it, and both are in use. I guess I could move it one way or the other, so that only 1 hole was bolted to the frame?

    Is there any way to tell for sure what year this frame is - and what travel it has?

  4. #4
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    From that pic is looks like the shuttle is in the forward or slack position. There are actually four holes in the part that mounts to the frame and you use two or them.

    I'd imagine that shock has an 8.5" eye to eye measurement because it looks like the standard 5th Element that came with the frame back then. I'd leave it mounted just how it is with a Totem on the front. It'll have around a 66 degree HA. Perfect IMHO.

  5. #5
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    Ah, I think the penny has dropped - I can't see the other 2 sets of holes, coz they are covered by the frame itself.

    Thanks for your reply .Danno. !

    I figure I might play with the setup, no disrespect to your humble opinion, to see how it changes things. Are special tools required to compress/extend the shock, to change the mount position? Or a little bit of elbow grease will suffice perhaps?

    Cheers.

  6. #6
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    Allen key and a spanner is all you need to move the shuttle. Piece of cake mate But in my opinion it sux! cause it feels like your gonna KO yourself with your knees!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxfacta
    Are special tools required to compress/extend the shock, to change the mount position? Or a little bit of elbow grease will suffice perhaps?

    Cheers.
    Nah, no special tools. The shock is already extended when you're off the bike. If the bike's sitting on the ground and you pull the shock it'll kind of collapse under its own weight though. I usually pull the shock when it's in a bike stand.

    The 2nd set of holes is about 10mm forward of the ones being used. When you move it the back will raise about 26mm or 1 inch. It'll also get about 1.5 degrees steeper. The problem with that position is that you'll have about a 16" bottom bracket height.

  8. #8
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    How you doing with that BULLIT as a XC bike? I have an 05 as well and The frame is insanely heavy compared to my TOMAC 98 special. It's hard for me to see this as a XC bike.

    I would love to give it a try. What is the travel of the fork you are running on yours?

    Thanks!

  9. #9
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    not really an XC bike!

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbnj
    How you doing with that BULLIT as a XC bike? I have an 05 as well and The frame is insanely heavy compared to my TOMAC 98 special. It's hard for me to see this as a XC bike.

    I would love to give it a try. What is the travel of the fork you are running on yours?

    Thanks!
    I'm afraid I only rode it once with that setup. It had a 125mm Psylo - twitchy as hell. It was light enough to push up hills without much stress. But really, that's not what the bike was designed for.
    I bought the bike off a woman, who was going out with the Santa Cruz rep in South Australia back when she built it up. So I guess that explains a few things. She said she loved riding it, for what that's worth.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxfacta
    I'm afraid I only rode it once with that setup. It had a 125mm Psylo - twitchy as hell. It was light enough to push up hills without much stress. But really, that's not what the bike was designed for.
    I bought the bike off a woman, who was going out with the Santa Cruz rep in South Australia back when she built it up. So I guess that explains a few things. She said she loved riding it, for what that's worth.
    Yeah, I hear people set it up for XC but I was wondering how it was for that purpose. I'm probably going to set it up temporarily as a XC and get some miles in on it like that. Eventually, it will be a shuttle bike set up for DH once I get up some $$ for a decent dual crown fork.

    thanks for the info.

  11. #11
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    So thanks for the feedback guys. Just got back from a ride, after shifting the shuttle position. What a difference! You're not wrong about the high bottom bracket, I thought I'd need a ladder to get onboard. It sure makes a noticeable difference to the head angle - improves control dramatically, but makes you feel like you're sitting quite high and that an over-the-bars experience could be a reality.
    I guess it's horses for courses, and I'l spend a bit of time in each position and see how I go. I think the steeper setting is not bad for all-mountainy riding, it climbs and muscles thru the flatish singletrack no worries. And the slack position just fills you with confidence on the bigger hits when bombing downhill.

    Anyway, I'm now totally stoked on my Bullit.

  12. #12
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    You could also try to get ahold of one of the old slotted shuttles. They let you set the position anywhere you want. You could pick some middle ground.

    I've found that it's easier to get used to a slack headangle then a really high bottom bracket. You really do have to ride on the front though.


    I've got my 2001 Bullit set-up with a direct mounted 8.75 X 2.75 shock and a 7" Boxxer Ride. I've got about a 65.5 deg HA and a 14.2" BB. I love the geometry for DH. For jumping and tight twisty stuff, both of which I did this morning, I leave the Ride cranked down to 5". In that mode it sits at 13.5" BB height and the HA is about 68 deg.

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