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Thread: Vaya Builds

  1. #2401
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simonns View Post
    Just to update this, Salsa gave me a crash warranty on the orange GX frame. I swapped the parts from the other frame, built some new wheels cause of the 15mm axle and bam, a newish bike!
    How different is the ride between the two frames? I keep eyeballing the new vaya or the RLT 9 steel but just can't convince myself there will be enough of an improvement to merit the "upgrade".

  2. #2402
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    Quote Originally Posted by edthesped View Post
    How different is the ride between the two frames? I keep eyeballing the new vaya or the RLT 9 steel but just can't convince myself there will be enough of an improvement to merit the "upgrade".
    I'm curious about this too. I own a 2010 vaya that I love, it's a touch large and I would like to size down.

    I'm not interested in the carbon fork, but I bet it makes the ride a bit smoother. I'm interested to see how the offset fork influences the ride. The full cable housing and replaceable derailleur hanger are also something my current vaya doesn't have that I want.

    My only WISH for the vaya would be threaded boss under the fork crown and rear triangle for fender so they look nice. Seems like it would be easy to feature to add.
    Last edited by CaptainSlow; 01-19-2017 at 12:13 PM.

  3. #2403
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    Quote Originally Posted by edthesped View Post
    How different is the ride between the two frames? I keep eyeballing the new vaya or the RLT 9 steel but just can't convince myself there will be enough of an improvement to merit the "upgrade".
    The frame rides a little stiffer than the 2010. Could be the 15mm axle and the wheels I build for it are stiffer. I don't really notice the offset in the fork but when braking hard the fork doesn't flex at all compared the 2010. One other thing to note is the frames sizes are a bit different. The old frame was a 56 and seemed a bit small. My feet would rub the front wheel when taking slow sharp turns. The new frame doesn't come in 56 so I moved up to a 57 and I haven't had the rubbing problem but the cockpit seems tighter despite having the same handle bars and stem as the last frame. I haven't really compared the geometry between the two frames but I'm guessing there's a difference.
    I'm torn on if I like the replaceable hanger. On the old frame I bent the hanger probably 10 times and was able to just bend it back no problems. I'll need to buy some hanger replacements for this frame.
    The only other difference I noticed is cosmetic, but the attention to detail on the 2010 frame far exceeds the new frame. "Ride and smile" is stamped on each drop out and the decals are way more detailed on the old frame.
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  4. #2404
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simonns View Post
    The frame rides a little stiffer than the 2010. Could be the 15mm axle and the wheels I build for it are stiffer. I don't really notice the offset in the fork but when braking hard the fork doesn't flex at all compared the 2010. One other thing to note is the frames sizes are a bit different. The old frame was a 56 and seemed a bit small. My feet would rub the front wheel when taking slow sharp turns. The new frame doesn't come in 56 so I moved up to a 57 and I haven't had the rubbing problem but the cockpit seems tighter despite having the same handle bars and stem as the last frame. I haven't really compared the geometry between the two frames but I'm guessing there's a difference.
    I'm torn on if I like the replaceable hanger. On the old frame I bent the hanger probably 10 times and was able to just bend it back no problems. I'll need to buy some hanger replacements for this frame.
    The only other difference I noticed is cosmetic, but the attention to detail on the 2010 frame far exceeds the new frame. "Ride and smile" is stamped on each drop out and the decals are way more detailed on the old frame.
    My 2012 Fargo has the "Ride and Smile" dropouts as well. I wonder when they gave up on those. I like them!
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  5. #2405
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    Quote Originally Posted by SocratesDiedTrolling View Post
    My 2012 Fargo has the "Ride and Smile" dropouts as well. I wonder when they gave up on those. I like them!
    2013 Vaya has it on the fork dropouts for sure, just fixed a flat tonight and saw it.

    Also, my 2013 uses a wheels manufacturing 142 hanger. I carry a spare hanger in my tool kit.

  6. #2406
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    Quote Originally Posted by edthesped View Post
    2013 Vaya has it on the fork dropouts for sure, just fixed a flat tonight and saw it.

    Also, my 2013 uses a wheels manufacturing 142 hanger. I carry a spare hanger in my tool kit.
    2015 Vaya Travel fork definitely has it.

  7. #2407
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    What's the largest tire you can run on a Vaya?

  8. #2408
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    Depends on the year. If you have 100/135 QR dropouts then mine will handle 44's without fenders


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    A guy in a german forum put Conti Race King 2.0s on his. [Link] to his photo page.

    Me, I'm currently still on the stock 41 Knards. They're OK, if a bit slow on pavement. I'll be trying Marathon Supremes 2.0 once the Knards go.

  10. #2410
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    Quote Originally Posted by benhimself View Post
    A guy in a german forum put Conti Race King 2.0s on his. [Link] to his photo page.

    Me, I'm currently still on the stock 41 Knards. They're OK, if a bit slow on pavement. I'll be trying Marathon Supremes 2.0 once the Knards go.
    That's rad. I've wanted to pull my fender off and run a set of 2.1 THUNDER BURT HS 451's for grinding the gravel/fireroads around here. I knew clearance would be tight, but glad to the race kings fit too.

  11. #2411
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    FWIW I read that Thunder Burts measure out to 2.0.

    Contis run small too.

  12. #2412
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    My Frankenbike rebuilt, powder coated 2012 Vaya frame on a 70° February day in Kansas. My fingers almost refused to type that.






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  13. #2413
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    Quote Originally Posted by rashidkpc View Post
    2015 57cm Vaya Travel. I swear its in there somewhere

    Attachment 1089137
    what is this sorcery? is the mesh and straps a specific product, or did you make this yourself? my lbs has a travel in stock and i'm not normally into road bikes, nor do i travel, but i haven't been able to stop thinking about it since i saw this picture.
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  14. #2414
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    They are an S&S coupler thing. The Security Net.

    Security Net used to protect your bike if TSA opens the case
    Cross • Trail • Fat • Tour • Commute

  15. #2415
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    They are an S&S coupler thing. The Security Net.

    Security Net used to protect your bike if TSA opens the case
    tyvm
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  16. #2416
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    I'm looking for a recommendation on a good locking skewer. My vaya is my daily driver and while I'm careful where I lock her up I worry about my wheels getting ripped off. I typically lock the front wheel with the frame and bike rack, however a little extra security never hurts.

    The ones below will seem to work, but they look cheap.
    https://www.biketiresdirect.com/prod...FY17fgod0iAOWA

  17. #2417
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    I've been using Sunlite 5 sided Allen key locking skewers for a few years. Nothing will stop a determined thief but these deter the casual passerby.

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    I would recommend locking your rear wheel inside your U lock, then using a looped cable to run through the front. Locking skewers are fine, but you will still be better off upgrading your lock than spending money on something that won't protect your bike as a whole. Maybe you already have a nice lock and are looking for extra security. Just remember, it's not just how much hardware you have that deters thieves, but where you lock your bike up. For example, I will choose the rack in front of a busy coffee shop rather than in the middle of a larger bike lock area. The more public your spot is, the less likely someone will be able to swipe something. Good luck!

  19. #2419
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    Beautiful builds here! I love my current Vaya, but am looking to upgrade. Here are my thoughts on what it would take to make the BEST possible (mechanically not necessarily aesthetically) Vaya build. This would be for winter commuting and short bikepacking trips in mountaineous terrain.

    1) Lower gearing than anything available on the stock 2017 Vaya builds
    2) Hydraulic disc brakes
    3) Shed a little weight (not that important)

    I'm considering a couple options I haven't seen here.

    Option A)
    Shimano RS505 (105 level) hydraulic brifters and brakes, ultegra front and rear derailleur, 11-32 11 speed cassette, XT8000 38-22 double crankset (I'd have to buy a 38-28 and swap the inner ring). This would probably be the front runner but I'm not sure how well the front shifting would be and the XT crankset has a q factor of 170 vs the 150 road I'm used to, not sure how that would be long term.

    Option B)
    Full XT8000 3 x 11 triple drivetrain (40/30/22) with 11-32 or 11-36 cassette. Microshift bar end shifters. TRP Hylex RS hydraulic brakes. Negatives of this setup would be bar end shifters may not be as good for commuting (having to take your hands away from brakes a safety issue?). Also I feel comfortable Shimano hydraulics are as reliable as hydraulics come; not sure about TRP Hylex.

    Option C)
    My friend is selling a force 1x hydraulic groupset for a decent price. Negative of this setup would be that I would lose a lot of top end gearing if I set up the crank for low gearing (or have huge jumps between gears).

    Wheels would be a big area to cut weight as would be getting a frameset with the carbon fork (have ridden both extensively and think there are positives and negatives of both, but that's another subject).

    What do you guys think? Thanks in advance!

  20. #2420
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcusab View Post
    Beautiful builds here! I love my current Vaya, but am looking to upgrade. Here are my thoughts on what it would take to make the BEST possible (mechanically not necessarily aesthetically) Vaya build. This would be for winter commuting and short bikepacking trips in mountaineous terrain.

    1) Lower gearing than anything available on the stock 2017 Vaya builds
    2) Hydraulic disc brakes
    3) Shed a little weight (not that important)

    I'm considering a couple options I haven't seen here.

    Option A)
    Shimano RS505 (105 level) hydraulic brifters and brakes, ultegra front and rear derailleur, 11-32 11 speed cassette, XT8000 38-22 double crankset (I'd have to buy a 38-28 and swap the inner ring). This would probably be the front runner but I'm not sure how well the front shifting would be and the XT crankset has a q factor of 170 vs the 150 road I'm used to, not sure how that would be long term.

    Option B)
    Full XT8000 3 x 11 triple drivetrain (40/30/22) with 11-32 or 11-36 cassette. Microshift bar end shifters. TRP Hylex RS hydraulic brakes. Negatives of this setup would be bar end shifters may not be as good for commuting (having to take your hands away from brakes a safety issue?). Also I feel comfortable Shimano hydraulics are as reliable as hydraulics come; not sure about TRP Hylex.

    Option C)
    My friend is selling a force 1x hydraulic groupset for a decent price. Negative of this setup would be that I would lose a lot of top end gearing if I set up the crank for low gearing (or have huge jumps between gears).

    Wheels would be a big area to cut weight as would be getting a frameset with the carbon fork (have ridden both extensively and think there are positives and negatives of both, but that's another subject).

    What do you guys think? Thanks in advance!
    Another spendy option would be a Sugino compact + double, narrow Q factor and smaller chainrings coupled with an 11-36 rear cassette and brifters of your choice.

  21. #2421
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    Thanks for the heads up - that's a beautiful crankset. I probably could swap out the inner ring for a 24t with the 74 bcd. Ultegra I think can't do 11-36 in the rear officiallly.

  22. #2422
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcusab View Post
    Beautiful builds here! I love my current Vaya, but am looking to upgrade. Here are my thoughts on what it would take to make the BEST possible (mechanically not necessarily aesthetically) Vaya build. This would be for winter commuting and short bikepacking trips in mountaineous terrain.

    1) Lower gearing than anything available on the stock 2017 Vaya builds
    2) Hydraulic disc brakes
    3) Shed a little weight (not that important)

    I'm considering a couple options I haven't seen here.

    Option A)
    Shimano RS505 (105 level) hydraulic brifters and brakes, ultegra front and rear derailleur, 11-32 11 speed cassette, XT8000 38-22 double crankset (I'd have to buy a 38-28 and swap the inner ring). This would probably be the front runner but I'm not sure how well the front shifting would be and the XT crankset has a q factor of 170 vs the 150 road I'm used to, not sure how that would be long term.

    Option B)
    Full XT8000 3 x 11 triple drivetrain (40/30/22) with 11-32 or 11-36 cassette. Microshift bar end shifters. TRP Hylex RS hydraulic brakes. Negatives of this setup would be bar end shifters may not be as good for commuting (having to take your hands away from brakes a safety issue?). Also I feel comfortable Shimano hydraulics are as reliable as hydraulics come; not sure about TRP Hylex.

    Option C)
    My friend is selling a force 1x hydraulic groupset for a decent price. Negative of this setup would be that I would lose a lot of top end gearing if I set up the crank for low gearing (or have huge jumps between gears).

    Wheels would be a big area to cut weight as would be getting a frameset with the carbon fork (have ridden both extensively and think there are positives and negatives of both, but that's another subject).

    What do you guys think? Thanks in advance!
    you won't lose much top end with force 1 if you have a cassette with a 10t cog, depending on what size chainring you select.

    my girlfriend has a vaya with a xt 42-28 crank/fd with ultegra 11speed shifters which works fine except for trim. i don't think the q-factor is really that noticeable.

    that said there are other (better imo) options, mostly made possible by the wolftooth tanpan or roadlink. i have an ultegra 46-36 with an 11-40 cassette via a roadlink. i think with a tanpan and an slx or xt gs rd (which would allow an 11-42 i believe) would be even better.

    pair any of these options with the rs685 shifters (which are fantastic) and i think that checks all your boxes. i doubt you'll drop any weight though.

  23. #2423
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcusab View Post
    Thanks for the heads up - that's a beautiful crankset. I probably could swap out the inner ring for a 24t with the 74 bcd. Ultegra I think can't do 11-36 in the rear officiallly.
    I've been running an OX601D for a year now and have been pretty happy with it overall, I do however experience chain suck if I'm mashing during a downshift though so I have to make sure I back off a bit when I downshift on the crank. I got my setup at HubJub prior to their selling retail boxed sets so I was able to tailor my rings a little better than you can now.

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    thanks for the heads up regarding your girlfriend's vaya with the 42-28 xt. what are the trim issues - does she get a lot of chain rub?

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    Given assumptions: 90 rpm, 622-35 tires, no more than 2,6° chain angle.

    Option A gives you a speed range from 10.2 - 41 km/h with a biggest noticeable gearjump of 14% from 38-16 to 38-14 (jump from 28 to 32 km/h, you will notice this). Total bandwidth is 395%.

    Option B (11-32) gives you a speed range from 8.1 - 43 km/h with a biggest noticeable gearjump of 9%, which is good. Total bandwidth is 529%. You would buy this with a triple setup though, which is in reality less usable and jumps wider than the gear calculator would make us believe; due to the fact that people (at least, I do) tend to switch more in the back and less in the front.
    Option B (11-36) gives you not a lot of change except you can go down to 7.2 km/h with 90rpm. Since the gear calc doesn't offer the Shimano cassette in 11-36 I had to use the SRAM cassette, which is apparently spaced wider in the higher gears - resulting in a gear jump of 13% from 30-11 to 40-13 (as said before, more probably you would jump 15% from 40-15 to 40-13: speed-wise, this jumps from 29.5 to 36.5 / 28.5 to 36.5 km/h). How much gear you need in the low range you will need to find out yourself. Total bandwidth with this would be 595%, but changes at lowspeed always give more % than changes at highspeed so it doesn't mean too much.

    Option C is the 1x variant of the force groupset; I assumed an XD 10-42 cassette and a 36 tooth chainring; this gets very close to option A with a speed range of 10.1 to 43 km/h. Naturally gear jumps are higher, with as much as 20% between 36-12 (35.5 km/h) and 36-10 (43 km/h); usually this will be less of a bother as the higher-mid-range jumps are what's relevant. These are fairly nice with 2-3 km/h increases up to 30 km/h. Total bandwidth for this is 420%, which would give you more than the 2x11 setup from option A, but of course the tuning options for A are much wider due to the double chainring setup.

    The probably more usable variant for A would be a 24-38 (8-41 km/h) setup, or a 28-40 (10-43 km/h) if you'd rather have high range. Of course the gear calc doesn't offer all possible combinations but rather standard manufacturer offerings. More extreme examples for special chain ring combinations would be this 44-26 combination or this 50-32 setup.

    My 2 cents is that a 2x10 or 2x11 setup is the best usable option in the real world, giving you tunable low gears as well as tunable high gears. I am not a big fan of 3x setups, but if you want an option giving you exactly 90 rpm with any possible combination of load, incline and headwind, that's your way to go. I'd rather not use 1x setups for touring, although you can tune them to your needs if you know the terrain to come. However for joyrides and overnighters, 1x is excellent.

    Cheers,
    Ben

    Gear calculator used: Ritzelrechner which is about the best currently in existence.
    Last edited by benhimself; 03-02-2017 at 03:03 AM.

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    My Vaya in "race" setup. This is with a newly built wheelset with Schwalbe G-One speed tires on Stan's Ztr Grail, spoked with Sapim D-lights (28 front and rear) on Hope Pro4 RS hubs.

    Other noteworthy parts are Sram Rival 1 hydraulic groupset, Brooks Cambium C17 saddle and Ritchey Evomax handlebars. The saddle and handlebars are going to be switched soon, the saddle for a more narrow C15 and a the handlebars for wider Easton EA70 AX.

    I'll post another picture of commuter-mode soon.

  27. #2427
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    Hey Ben,

    Thanks for the tips. I agree with you that the wide range double is probably the ideal way to go. It seems that we both agree that total range and having small steps between gears is important for touring bike gearing.

    I don't understand why some people favor gearing like 46/36 and 11-36 or 11-42 (as mentioned above in the thread) - seems like you end up having big jumps between the gears the in way that most people shift (mainly with the rear, as you mentioned). In my ideal world I would have something like 42/16 with 11-28 11 speed if there were any systems that could handle that (haha). That would give a huge range of gearing, minimal overlap, and small steps between gears in the rear.
    Best,
    Marcus

  28. #2428
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    Quote Originally Posted by boowks View Post
    I just put some Evomax bars on mine too. HUGE stiffness improvement over the cowbells. I sized up to 46 too so there's more stability too.
    Vaya Builds-img_20170301_115243104.jpg
    I had to put studs back on and also warranty a Compass Snoqualmie pass. It always bothered me that they measured out to be 41.8mm on my Velocity Ailerons (20mm internal width) so I put one on some Velocity Blunt SS and they measured 44.7. Blunts are like 25.6mm internal width.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

  29. #2429
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcusab View Post
    Hey Ben,

    Thanks for the tips. I agree with you that the wide range double is probably the ideal way to go. It seems that we both agree that total range and having small steps between gears is important for touring bike gearing.

    I don't understand why some people favor gearing like 46/36 and 11-36 or 11-42 (as mentioned above in the thread) - seems like you end up having big jumps between the gears the in way that most people shift (mainly with the rear, as you mentioned). In my ideal world I would have something like 42/16 with 11-28 11 speed if there were any systems that could handle that (haha). That would give a huge range of gearing, minimal overlap, and small steps between gears in the rear.
    Best,
    Marcus
    i think people prefer it because there aren't other good options. you'd need a crankset with a different bcd and possibly a different q-factor. and mtb fd are often only semi-workable with road shifters. my girlfriend has a deore xt fd and crank with ultegra 11 speed shifters and it works but trim does not. ideal for me would be 46-30 x 11-32, but 46-36 x 11-40 works ok until that is easier to do.

  30. #2430
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    Quote Originally Posted by boowks View Post


    My Vaya in "race" setup. This is with a newly built wheelset with Schwalbe G-One speed tires on Stan's Ztr Grail, spoked with Sapim D-lights (28 front and rear) on Hope Pro4 RS hubs.

    Other noteworthy parts are Sram Rival 1 hydraulic groupset, Brooks Cambium C17 saddle and Ritchey Evomax handlebars. The saddle and handlebars are going to be switched soon, the saddle for a more narrow C15 and a the handlebars for wider Easton EA70 AX.

    I'll post another picture of commuter-mode soon.
    is there any brake rub when out of the saddle or anything? i am thinking about putting shimano's hydraulics on mine (a 2015 frame) but am worried the clearances are so tight that it will be both annoying to align it when putting the wheel back in and prone to rubbing.

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    I'm one of the oddball people that still uses compact road gearing (50/34 and 11-32), but I don't have an issue making it through the hills/mountains on a 34 up front. For the back, small increments bug me, I just end up jumping 2 gears at a time. Loaded touring is pretty much all I do lol.

    Still taking good care of my baby, but the racks and seat show a bit of mileage
    Vaya Builds-imag00600.jpg

  32. #2432
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    Quote Originally Posted by zmjones View Post
    is there any brake rub when out of the saddle or anything? i am thinking about putting shimano's hydraulics on mine (a 2015 frame) but am worried the clearances are so tight that it will be both annoying to align it when putting the wheel back in and prone to rubbing.
    There is some rubbing, but very little and not enough to annoy me. Then again, I am used to some disc rub from my mtb.

    Can't say I have any alignment problems when putting wheels back. When I change wheels a 2-minute fix is enough to deal with any alignment that isn't quite right.

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    I'm going to test ride a Salsa Vaya 2015 in light blue this week. I hope I like it!

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    Any of you guys put thought into carbon vs steel fork Vayas? I've ridden both (have the steel and test rode the carbon a bunch) and here are my impressions.

    Benefits of steel:
    soaks up big bumps really well
    seems more appropriate for the utility like feel of the bike, don't have to worry about it as much with travel, crashes

    Benefits of carbon:
    saves about a pound on weight
    stiffer

    In terms of comfort, I would give the steel fork a definite win. Carbon with thru axle is stiff - it doesn't absorb the big hits (which annoy me more) but is just as good as the steel with small road chatter. The carbon definitely is not bad though, still a very comfortable bike.

    I have noticed some instability on my steel fork when braking and coming down a hill while moderately loaded with two panniers. I thought this was the steel fork getting wiggly, but based on the some comments earlier in this thread I think it may be brake judder.

    I actually called the guys from Salsa to ask them what they thought in terms of ride quality, and they agreed that some people find the carbon with thru axle stiffer and my sense that it didn't absorb the big hits as well could make sense. They did say that the stiff thru axle fork helps keeping a line off road.

    Anyone else with similar/different experiences?

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  36. #2436
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcusab View Post
    Any of you guys put thought into carbon vs steel fork Vayas? I've ridden both (have the steel and test rode the carbon a bunch) and here are my impressions.

    Benefits of steel:
    soaks up big bumps really well
    seems more appropriate for the utility like feel of the bike, don't have to worry about it as much with travel, crashes

    Benefits of carbon:
    saves about a pound on weight
    stiffer

    In terms of comfort, I would give the steel fork a definite win. Carbon with thru axle is stiff - it doesn't absorb the big hits (which annoy me more) but is just as good as the steel with small road chatter. The carbon definitely is not bad though, still a very comfortable bike.

    I have noticed some instability on my steel fork when braking and coming down a hill while moderately loaded with two panniers. I thought this was the steel fork getting wiggly, but based on the some comments earlier in this thread I think it may be brake judder.

    I actually called the guys from Salsa to ask them what they thought in terms of ride quality, and they agreed that some people find the carbon with thru axle stiffer and my sense that it didn't absorb the big hits as well could make sense. They did say that the stiff thru axle fork helps keeping a line off road.

    Anyone else with similar/different experiences?
    I definitely prefer the feel and comfort of steel and I will gladly take the weight penalty. The carbon fork tends to be more damp(soaks up more small vibrations than steel), however it doesn't take the big hits well like you've mentioned and for me that is very important.

    However, I haven't noticed my steel fork being "wiggly" that would be cause for concern. Mine is solid as ...steel

  37. #2437
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    Love this bike. Just put the Vitesse EX's on and really digging them so far.

    Vaya Builds-vaya-np-1500.jpg
    Oh noes. I'm going to drink the Kool-Aid.

  38. #2438
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    I have the Vaya 3 2015 model that came with the Sun SR25 rims and I have a couple questions I thought might get answered here....

    Will 25mm road tires work on these rims? If so, is this a good idea?

    Has anyone done a century on their Vaya?

    What would be a decent wheelset to replace the one I have?

    Thanks for any input.

  39. #2439
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    The SR25 has an inner diameter of 20mm - the smallest official width suggestion of Mavic for that rim width is 32mm. Companies usually err on the side of caution, but Mavic tend to know their shit - I myself would probably not go smaller than 30mm and call 28mm cutting it close.

    The other question is, why would you want a 25mm tire? A 28mm is in 90% of all possible conditions faster (less rolling resistance) and more comfortable, unless you have a really smooth tarmac or really fast travel speed (40+ km/h) where aerodynamics play the superior role.

    Regarding wheelsets, for this season I ordered one with WTB cI24 rims (following the "road plus" trend), for aluminium options I would look at wheelsets with WTB KOM or Velocity Aileron rims.

    Centuries are not a very difficult thing to do, on a Vaya even less so than on other bicycle options as it is designed to carry you (and some luggage) in comfort. I ride metric centuries pretty regularly, an imperial century only once so far.

  40. #2440
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    well how difficult they are depends on how fast you want to ride and your local terrain. it is hard for me to avoid doing less that about 7000 ft of climbing in 100 miles, which isn't a ton but definitely took it out of me the first few times i did it.

    as far as replacing the wheelset, i'd look for a wideish (> 17mmm internal width) tubeless alloy wheelset. something built with hed belgium, pacenti sl25, easton ec90sl, etc. rims will be good. i'd look on pinkbike/ebay.

  41. #2441
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    Never listen to Mavic when it comes to rim width. They finally moved away from 15i road rims like a week ago.

    I tried some 23c tires on 20i Ailerons, but as Ben said, go at least 28. Vayas are designed around a 40c tire though so you'll be low riding.

    If I didn't run 30c Xerxes in the winter I'd build up a wheel with Velocity Blunt SSs and White Industries hubs. If you're under 5'10 or so i'd go 650b, if you're taller than that do 700c.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

  42. #2442
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volsung View Post
    Never listen to Mavic when it comes to rim width. They finally moved away from 15i road rims like a week ago.
    Now I am not a fan of very narrow rims either, but I don't think this is a good reason for dismissing their know-how. Their recommendation for 15c rims are tires from 23 to 32mm, which sounds pretty much spot on to me, which also means that there are applications where 15c rims make sense.

    These just aren't what we ride, though.

  43. #2443
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    Looking at picking up a Vaya soon to do some light touring with. Thanks everyone for the info in this thread.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  44. #2444
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky831 View Post
    I have the Vaya 3 2015 model that came with the Sun SR25 rims and I have a couple questions I thought might get answered here....

    Will 25mm road tires work on these rims? If so, is this a good idea?

    Has anyone done a century on their Vaya?

    What would be a decent wheelset to replace the one I have?

    Thanks for any input.
    I ended up getting 28mm Gatorskins. I have two rides on them and they are great so far. All riding I have done is on country back roads with some bumps and potholes and a couple short sections of gravel. Riding at 110psi. So far so good. I'm still going to get a second wheelset so I can switch between my Clement tires faster.

  45. #2445
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    Can anyone point me towards a thread entry that has the weight of the stock wheelset on the 2015 Vaya 3? The wheelset has the Sun SR25 rims with the Formula Salsa hubs.

    I just want to make sure I'm shedding weight when I get a new set and not adding weight.

    Thanks!

  46. #2446
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    Love this bike, it goes everywhere.

    Very impressed with the Soma Supple Vitesse stiil...amazed I haven't flatted yet and grip on or off road is really good. Very predictable tire.

    Oh noes. I'm going to drink the Kool-Aid.

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