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  1. #1
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    Dog strategy - Gravel

    Hi All,

    I've been chased on country roads riding my road or tt bike and have always been able to out pedal my four-legged pursuer. This morning, in the dark and on somewhat fresh laid gravel, I got chased by a yellow lab or golden retriever. I'm not sure what kind of dog or if it was chasing for fun or with intent to kill since it was dark. It did have a very deep menacing bark. After increasing the speed to a whopping 15 mph I pedaled away from him. The chase lasted way longer than on the road-bike.

    Is this about the only strategy when encountering a canine hot-pursuit situation? Any suggestions?

    It was still a great ride.

    See ya
    Josh

  2. #2
    gran jefe
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    subscribed to see the answer. yesterday i got chased by a dog whose bark seriously sounded like a child yelling. it was very very disturbing.

  3. #3
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    Maybe I should have named the thread: Vent about weird dog encounters.

    Thank heaven dogs generally take a bad angle on their initial charge off the porch.

  4. #4
    gran jefe
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    I'll save my other weird dog encounters, hoping that someone actually answers your question.

  5. #5
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    I stop

    I stop keep my bike between me and the dog and talk nice. I have turned many a chaser into a friendly mutt that I can ride by with no problems. I think that when dogs chase bikes it is because they think we are prey. My goal is to stop being prey. The one time I tried to ride away I was bitten. Cattle dogs are the worst.

    I want to know about Donkeys. One almost stomped me the other day.

    That's my strategy.

    Hope is helps.

    Don

  6. #6
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    Don,

    Nice idea.
    Thanks for the thoughtful response.

    Josh

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Galloway View Post
    I stop keep my bike between me and the dog and talk nice. I have turned many a chaser into a friendly mutt that I can ride by with no problems. I think that when dogs chase bikes it is because they think we are prey. My goal is to stop being prey.
    This is my approach. Never had a negative outcome. Once you stop and say hi, they usually come up looking for a little pet and then move on their way.

    A better question is this:
    Deer really do freeze when spotted with a light. What do you do on tight single track when you don't realize there is a deer standing frozen in the middle of the trail until you are within 20 ft of it? Had this happen this morning with a large buck. Half of me was appreciating the moment of being this close to nature. The other half was wondering what would happen if he decided to skewer me. I bounced a rock in his general direction and watched him tear off through the woods.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by car_nut View Post
    Deer really do freeze when spotted with a light. What do you do on tight single track when you don't realize there is a deer standing frozen in the middle of the trail until you are within 20 ft of it? Had this happen this morning with a large buck. Half of me was appreciating the moment of being this close to nature. The other half was wondering what would happen if he decided to skewer me. I bounced a rock in his general direction and watched him tear off through the woods.
    I had a buck come at me while night riding last autumn. It was in some brush along the side of the trail, and as I went past I saw it lower its head, then as soon as I passed I heard a LOT of crashing and thumping behind me. I'm glad I know the trails I was on.

    Look here to see my HRM data. It's pretty obvious where the encounter occurred. Scared the hell out of me.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by c0nsumer View Post
    Look here to see my HRM data. It's pretty obvious where the encounter occurred. Scared the hell out of me.
    Whoa! Definitely looks like your adrenal gland must have emptied its entire contents in about .2 seconds. I think you're onto a fantastic new training methodology: deer intervals.

  10. #10
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    I read both these tips a long time ago, so can't claim ownership.
    1) change the dogs angle of attack. This only seems to work if they have seen you coming and attack from the front or the side. Dogs apparently calculate their approach angle of attack quickly and easily. Steer towards them, or away and it causes them to pause. Just don't dodge yourself into traffic.
    2) have water bottle ready and squirt them in the mouth. Nothing like trying to bark and breath at full gallop and then getting force fed water. It seems to really startle themand gives you a short advantage.




    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2

  11. #11
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    I'm going to ride by the offending pooch Monday during the day and try to make friends with him/her hopefully learn its name. If the nice plan doesn't work I'll use the water bottle method. Thanks for the suggestion.

  12. #12
    gran jefe
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    and report it to animal control every single time it chases you.

    good luck!

  13. #13
    Northern Aggressor
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    Quote Originally Posted by car_nut View Post
    This is my approach. Never had a negative outcome. Once you stop and say hi, they usually come up looking for a little pet and then move on their way.

    A better question is this:
    Deer really do freeze when spotted with a light. What do you do on tight single track when you don't realize there is a deer standing frozen in the middle of the trail until you are within 20 ft of it? Had this happen this morning with a large buck. Half of me was appreciating the moment of being this close to nature. The other half was wondering what would happen if he decided to skewer me. I bounced a rock in his general direction and watched him tear off through the woods.
    x3, stop, rapidly dismount and make scary noises. Dogs just chase stuff, they ussaully aren't looking to fight.

  14. #14
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    If a polite "hey doggie" doesn't subdue them, yelling really loud usually scares the crap out of them. I had some aggressive dog encounters when I lived in Mississippi. Sometimes you have to sacrifice a water bottle...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by car_nut View Post
    This is my approach. Never had a negative outcome. Once you stop and say hi, they usually come up looking for a little pet and then move on their way.

    .
    Yep, I do this while still riding. Dogs like it when you talk nice. When you yell, it generally only escalates the dog to get more tense and angry. (I mean- who likes getting yelled at, right?)

    Generally I ask them to run along with me. How fast are you, eh? That sort of thing. Seems to confuse them when their "prey" is talking like their master.

    Never fails for me. The only bad thing is, sometimes they do run with you, and I had a cute little black Lab female run three miles with me before her nose distracted her off the road.

  16. #16
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    water

    Quote Originally Posted by Iowagriz View Post
    2) have water bottle ready and squirt them in the mouth. Nothing like trying to bark and breath at full gallop and then getting force fed water. It seems to really startle themand gives you a short advantage. Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2
    This has worked surprisingly well for me.
    All good expeditions should be simple in concept, difficult in their execution and satisfying to remember--Alastair Humphreys

  17. #17
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    I once had a blog titled "Farm dogs are sprint training".

    "cool story bro"

    Thanks.
    Disclaimer:I work in a Bike Shop.http://www.northcentralcyclery.com/

  18. #18
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    Today I implemented the advised strategy regarding the offending creature.

    It turns out my earlier encounter wasn't with a yellow lab or golden retriever at all. It was a flippin' mastiff! Wow, I'm glad it was dark 'cause this thing is big.

    So this morning in the daytime, I rode up toward the farm house and here comes Marmaduke. I did what was suggested, I got off the bike and kept it in between him and me. He was barking and carrying on and his head is above my top tube, but his tail was wagging. That's a good sign, right?

    So, I spoke nicely and tried to make friends and he did settle down a little. I had brought along a dog treat and I tossed it to him and he ate it. I spoke to him a little more and then got back on the bike. He was barking still but with a lot less enthusiasm. As I slowly peddled away he went back in his yard squatted down to drop a load and, I think, forget all about me.

    Wednesday morning I'll test his memory, in the dark.

    Thanks for the suggestions, so far so good.

    Josh

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hand/of/Midas View Post
    I once had a blog titled "Farm dogs are sprint training".

    "cool story bro"

    Thanks.
    Tips for handling farm dogs:

    1. Ride with someone else; never ride alone.
    2. When dog approaches, start riding faster.
    3. You do not need to be faster than the dog. (You just need to be faster than the other rider).

  20. #20
    gran jefe
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    Quote Originally Posted by lawfarm View Post
    Tips for handling farm dogs:

    1. Ride with someone else; never ride alone.
    2. When dog approaches, start riding faster.
    3. You do not need to be faster than the dog. (You just need to be faster than the other rider).
    4. Carry a stick in case things get really bad. A 3 foot length of broom handle will do. If the dog pursues you, and you are not able to outrun your friend, jam the stick through his spokes.

  21. #21
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    Guys, guys, guys....it's called a frame pump.

  22. #22
    get down!
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    Bacon soaked SOS pads...drop them and ride away.

    Just joking, never do that. I just ride really really fast and talk nicely like everyone else said. Sometimes it's hard to stop when you're in the middle of a long ride. And/or I don't want to stop.
    Rudy Projects look ridiculous

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  23. #23
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    If the dog is actually already near the road when I'm coming up on him and he starts barking and coming towards me as I approach, I actually aim for him and yell GIT!. This usually scares them enough to leave me alone. I'm not 100 percent with this, but it usually works really well for me. If they come up behind me I just look at it as sprint training.

  24. #24
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    Twice this week I've tested the "speak nice" strategy.

    Unfortunately the mastiff has also employed a new strategy. He waits patiently day after day until I crest the hill then he lumbers off the porch and waits for me in the middle of the road. Luckily he just runs in front then next to me until I speed up and he pops.

    I'm not sure the "speaking nice" strategy has done any good.

    The one change I've made is how I approach his house. Instead of passing uphill now I approach on the downhill. This way it is much easier to out run him.

    He's not yet snapped at my leg but when that happens I may have to adjust my routing.

    Great weather here in Iowa today. Have fun out there.

    Josh
    Last edited by xxxxx; 09-28-2012 at 04:51 PM.

  25. #25
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    That almost sounds like he enjoys your company and wants to play.

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