Results 1 to 42 of 42
  1. #1
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,004

    Who makes Rocky carbon frames?

    I just bought a 90RSL monocoque frame (road)
    I post here 'cause there is not a lot of knowledge on Rocky road frames on road forums , so I thought maybe around here, someone will know the company very well.....

    I know they are made in Taiwan , but is it Giant , Merida ,...... ????
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  2. #2
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,105
    Martec in Taiwan is the manufacturer's name I heard.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  3. #3
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,004
    Thanx for the info
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  4. #4
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
    Reputation: DeeEight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,762
    I hadnt heard martec but that would make sense as I've heard the manufacturer mentioned for other equal brands. Of course expect delays... Martec and other frame makers are facing carbon fiber shortages again this season. People in the sports world don't seem to grasp that the raw material isn't made by the same manufacturers who then produce their frames and golf club shafts and so on. And the suppliers for that raw material sell to primarily to aerospace and defence companies. Booming demand in the defence sector is leading to short falls for other sectors.

    http://www.allbusiness.com/retail-tr...4147432-1.html
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    306
    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill
    Martec in Taiwan is the manufacturer's name I heard.
    Sorry, that is incorrect. We pick the best partners to work with for each individual platform - end of story.

  6. #6
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,105
    See, you can't rely on LBS rumours. Is it the Vertex that's a Martec frame?
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  7. #7
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
    Reputation: DeeEight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,762
    Well given that Martec is one of the best manufacturers of carbon frames...
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RMB-PM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    458
    Ok, to break the radio silence. I want to set the record straight. Here is the Official Party Line:

    We (RMB) make our carbon frames, with the help of some of the best vendors in the world. Our engineers work hand in hand with these vendors to develop our products to our standards and goals. We go through an exhaustive selection process in chosing vendors, dependent on a number of factors, be they our Vancouver facility, or an overseas frame specialist.

    It's no secret that we use outside vendors. We won't go shouting their names from the roof top, because the take home here is that at the end of the day they are OUR products. Just like it's not Magna that makes your car, it's brand X.

    But if you're in Vancouver, and want to see what happens in our frame shop, come on by, I'll show you around and pour you a coffee.
    Product Manager
    RMB
    Main Rides: 14 Proto - 13 Element RSL 29 - 13 Altitude MSL - 13 Prestige RSL

  9. #9
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,004
    Who's your "partner" for the solos then?

    Is the solo 90 RSL made in St-Georges ?

    Just joking....


    PS; You can PM me...
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RMB-PM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    458
    Our brothers in STG are too busy to be up to their elbows in resin and itchy fibers...

    Don't worry. It's one of the best in the biz.
    Product Manager
    RMB
    Main Rides: 14 Proto - 13 Element RSL 29 - 13 Altitude MSL - 13 Prestige RSL

  11. #11
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,105
    At the rate Boeing is having trouble, maybe CF will be more available for bike frames.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RMB-PM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    458
    Nah, world supply being soaked up making $112k iPhone cases. We're scrambling to source a hemp alternative.

    http://www.carbonfibergear.com/11200...ost-expensive/



    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill
    At the rate Boeing is having trouble, maybe CF will be more available for bike frames.
    Product Manager
    RMB
    Main Rides: 14 Proto - 13 Element RSL 29 - 13 Altitude MSL - 13 Prestige RSL

  13. #13
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,105
    Quote Originally Posted by RMB-PM
    Nah, world supply being soaked up making $112k iPhone cases. We're scrambling to source a hemp alternative.
    Yeah, but what about finding something to make frames out of?

    I wonder if I'll have as much trust in flying in a carbon airplane as I do riding my carbon Vertex or Altitude? I don't think so somehow.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    98
    On topic, will the vertex be future proof.....Sram XX (bolt on f mech is too high), 2*9 (narrow BB, chainring clearance on stay)? Everyone going 2*9 now (even 1*9), XTR will have to make emerengcy release soon.

    Super frame, cant understand why element 2010 wont be carbon, current element is getting left behind :-(

  15. #15
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,105
    There's no way that the Shimano direct mount FD will be compatible with the SRAM XX direct mount, but then again, the XX FD is only 17gms lighter than the XT direct mount (with the cable stop trimmed off), so there's not a pressing need to use a SRAM XX unless you're sponsored by SRAM. I'm hoping that there's an XTR direct mount offered soon.

    I've got 10mm of clearance between the inside of both of the RF Next crank arms and the chainstays on the Vertex RSL, so there should be enough room for much narrower Q cranks and still keep clearance to the chainstays.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    98
    I just dont think the high FD mount on the vertex will allow the lower use of the mech for a 40t ring (for example). Also, chainring clearance with the narrow Q may be the issue, not the carnk arm. I know Giant XTC carbon have issues.

  17. #17
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,105
    The XT FD is nearly as far down as it can go on a 44T so if there is an XTR direct FD, they'd need a longer slot.

    I have about 5 or 6 mm clearance between a 44T ring and the chainstay, so a smaller diameter 37T or 40T chainring should have some clearance with the angle on the rings.

    Maybe Eurobike and Interbike will reveal some new Shimano stuff.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    98
    yeah, thats what I meant :-)

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    543
    Quote Originally Posted by joe90mccall
    Super frame, cant understand why element 2010 wont be carbon, current element is getting left behind :-(
    How long do you guys expect a carbon frame to last, or is it sad to care?

    My scandium Element is seven years old and feels as good as new, but my guess is that some of the bumps and scrapes it's had in that time could have been the beginning of the end for a carbon-fibre frame.

  20. #20
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
    Reputation: DeeEight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,762
    Typically 5 years.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  21. #21
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,105
    The warranty is 5 years on the carbon frames, but the nice thing about carbon is that it doesn't have a fatigue life, as long as you don't actually break it, it should last a long time.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RMB-PM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    458
    What he said.

    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill
    The warranty is 5 years on the carbon frames, but the nice thing about carbon is that it doesn't have a fatigue life, as long as you don't actually break it, it should last a long time.
    Product Manager
    RMB
    Main Rides: 14 Proto - 13 Element RSL 29 - 13 Altitude MSL - 13 Prestige RSL

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    543
    I may be an exception here, but I don't think 5 years is very long for a bike to live. A 1989 Rocky Mountain is a good bike to own and to ride, and steel is repairable and a Rocky Mountain is worthy of being repaired. But I wonder whether many of today's carbon-fibre frames will be owned and ridden in 2029?

    My concern is not just that they're not repairable, but I hear stories that if you have an accident that scrapes the surface of the carbon-fibre away, that area becomes suspect and likely to fail at some future point. If there's any truth in that, I would have concerns about whether it is sufficiently durable for an mtb frame material for anybody other than the initial owner.

    I was just wondering whether it's really true that making Elements out of scandium constitutes 'getting left behind', that's all. I suspect not.

    The photo below is of a 1989 Wedge, just to give a bit of context.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  24. #24
    sock puppet
    Reputation: osokolo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,047

    warranty seems to be on paper

    In my situation - warranty was denied. RM said - frame was crashed, yet frame was NEVER CRASHED. It lasted me 3 weeks, a far shy of 5 years or more.

    It is one thing to advertise warranty on paper. It is a completely different issue whether Rocky Mountain backs up their warranty promise. In my case, Rocky Mountain pulled every conceivable excuse why they did not want to replace the frame AS THE WARRANTY STATES.

    So, beware. Yes, Rocky Mountain says 5 years warranty for carbon frames, but in reality they qualify the issue as "crash" and offer "crash replacement".

    That is weak. I don't care what Rocky Mountain says. I care what Rocky Mountain does.

    In my case, Rocky Mountain warranty commitment was dishonored. I wish all of you more LUCK.



    Quote Originally Posted by RMB-PM
    What he said.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  25. #25
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
    Reputation: DeeEight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,762
    Well duh...you post pictures of damage to the stay with deep scratches and grooves in it. That doesn't happen from air bubble delamination or epoxy failure... that only comes from grinding the chainstay against something... most likely a rock, side of a concrete wall, or car door (a tree sideswipe is unlikely to do that much damage). I'd call that crash damage too. At the very least, I'd call that owner inflicted abuse. I wouldn't honour a warranty either. They're for defects in materials/manufacturing... not "accidents".
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  26. #26
    sock puppet
    Reputation: osokolo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,047

    still holding grudges?

    that is too bad. Life is too short to spend it like that...

    I suppose you would know if you hit a wall, or a rock or a car door? Also, how do you grind the chainstay against something - without hitting the pedal or your foot which sticks out way further than the chainstay?

    In any case - had I damaged the frame, I would have been happy to accept $650 "no fault damage" replacement, would I not? I refused to accept a new frame at $650 because I KNOW I didn't damage the frame. If Rocky Mountain decides to call me a liar - like you did - that is fine. In the long run, they will lose more potential buyers than what $650 is worth...

    I hope you do not end up in a situation like this, and if you did, I wouldn't use your misfortune in order to make myself feel better, for whatever reason.



    Quote Originally Posted by DeeEight
    Well duh...you post pictures of damage to the stay with deep scratches and grooves in it. That doesn't happen from air bubble delamination or epoxy failure... that only comes from grinding the chainstay against something... most likely a rock, side of a concrete wall, or car door (a tree sideswipe is unlikely to do that much damage). I'd call that crash damage too. At the very least, I'd call that owner inflicted abuse. I wouldn't honour a warranty either. They're for defects in materials/manufacturing... not "accidents".

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    221
    Carbon fibre can be repaired. I've rowed in carbon fibre boats for well over 20 years now and in a fair few that looked as though they should have been written off after accidents. I suppose it's a matter of finding the right person to do the job, pretty much the same as you would do with a steel frame, but the right people may be thinner on the ground at the moment. I suppose it will become more common when the demand increases.

  28. #28
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
    Reputation: DeeEight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,762
    Quote Originally Posted by osokolo
    that is too bad. Life is too short to spend it like that...
    Exactly what grudges am I holding? I can't even remember which of the many morons on here you're supposed to be.


    I suppose you would know if you hit a wall, or a rock or a car door? Also, how do you grind the chainstay against something - without hitting the pedal or your foot which sticks out way further than the chainstay?
    Not if I did it at night during a 24 hour race I wouldn't. Hell I rarely ever look down to see what I've smacked my frame/wheel/tire sidewalls against even in daylight unless I hear a new noise afterwards. I'm certainly not going to do it in the dark at all though.

    Incidently... most warranties for EVERY brand there on the market are voided the moment you use the bike for ANY competition use. Admit you've used it racing and you instantly voided the warranty. For that matter, assembling the bike yourself also is a valid reason to void the warranty (and is why the warranties for bikes state they have to be assembled by the dealers of the bikes).

    I've dealt with procycle over warranties... and for actual obvious defects, they're great (if a bit slow) but for things that look like abuse, they're not gonna bend over backwards. The "no fault" $650 option is above and beyond what they need to offer you given you've told everyone on here you've done various things which are valid reasons for voiding any implied warranty.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  29. #29
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
    Reputation: DeeEight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,762
    Quote Originally Posted by marmoset
    Carbon fibre can be repaired. I've rowed in carbon fibre boats for well over 20 years now and in a fair few that looked as though they should have been written off after accidents. I suppose it's a matter of finding the right person to do the job, pretty much the same as you would do with a steel frame, but the right people may be thinner on the ground at the moment. I suppose it will become more common when the demand increases.
    http://www.calfeedesign.com/

    Best carbon frame repair expert there is.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  30. #30
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,004
    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill
    The warranty is 5 years on the carbon frames, but the nice thing about carbon is that it doesn't have a fatigue life, as long as you don't actually break it, it should last a long time.
    Do you know if it's the same thing with my "I still don't know who made my bike" road frames?
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  31. #31
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,105
    Quote Originally Posted by fokof
    Do you know if it's the same thing with my "I still don't know who made my bike" road frames?
    Apparently all the carbon road and MTB frames have a 5 year warranty.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  32. #32
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,004
    Bumping the thread in case someone knows where who makes ( and where ) CF frames for RM ?
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    156
    It seems pretty cut and dry, they have many different manufacturing partners and they dont want to give out that info. Who can blame them? Their frames are ultimately their frames, if they pass on the QC it is a RM frame, its not like your gonna goto the factory if you have a problem with your RM, you goto RM.

  34. #34
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,004
    I'm just curious to know who makes the frame I'm riding.
    Wouldn't you ?
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  35. #35
    MT rider
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    255
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyinhove
    I may be an exception here, but I don't think 5 years is very long for a bike to live. A 1989 Rocky Mountain is a good bike to own and to ride, and steel is repairable and a Rocky Mountain is worthy of being repaired. But I wonder whether many of today's carbon-fibre frames will be owned and ridden in 2029?

    My concern is not just that they're not repairable, but I hear stories that if you have an accident that scrapes the surface of the carbon-fibre away, that area becomes suspect and likely to fail at some future point. If there's any truth in that, I would have concerns about whether it is sufficiently durable for an mtb frame material for anybody other than the initial owner.

    I was just wondering whether it's really true that making Elements out of scandium constitutes 'getting left behind', that's all. I suspect not.

    The photo below is of a 1989 Wedge, just to give a bit of context.
    Agree!! I think of it the same way.

    Bikes are primarily meant to be ridden, and with use, comes abuse! There's no other way, especially when off the road.

    Carbon-fibre, especially at these prices, is no option for me. I'll just stick to cro-mo and alu.

  36. #36
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,105
    You guys do realize you've just answered your own question, right? If Rocky only made steel hardtails and they lasted an average of 20-25 years there isn't a huge growth market for customers. That would put them in the same boat as my Sube dealer where at least once a year they ask if I'm going to trade in my 1992 Sube for a new one, and I keep saying I haven't worn this one out yet.

    The original Element 3D linkage was a happy accident, it wasn't designed to have the suspension curve that made it popular, it was designed to to be a FS bike that fixed the flexiness of the AMP rear end on the 95/96 Edge FS bikes, was buildable and looked like it fit the family, and it turned out to have that falling rate curve that made it popular with racers moving to a FS bike from a hardtail.

    It wasn't the scandium tubing that was leaving the Element design behind, it was the fact that so many other manufacturers were really advancing efficient high performance light weight 90-100mm travel full suspension designs from the rather dated Element design introduced in 1996.

    I had a 2000 Instinct with 3" of travel, and I rode that bike for 3 years before I "sprung" for a ETSX. There just wasn't a big enough ride quality difference between my Vertex and the Instinct, and it blew through the travel quickly, and was also very flexy in the rear end, even with fresh bushings. The ETSX was a huge improvement for a plush and supple FS bike (still a bit flexy in the 2004 model). What I noticed right away was that a more supple rear suspension made climbing on technical surfaces much much easier and that extra inch of travel made it comfy.

    What I'm really looking forward to seeing in the new carbon Element is the combination of the ETSX style Smooth link suspension suppleness with the improved lateral stiffness of the carbon frame. I like the fact that the designers have been given a mandate to make the best designs they can dream up and not be limited to conventional materials.

    I've got two full years of riding on my first generation Vertex RSL carbon frame, and it absolutely rides better than the aluminium, scandium or steel Rocky hardtails that I have owned (or still own), and except from a couple of minor nicks in the clearcoat that I've managed through clumsiness, it's holding up quite well.

    Obviously carbon is not for everyone, and there's still a sizable price spread between the cost of alloy or steel framed bikes that they still offer, and the high tech, high performance, high zoot carbon frames.

    If you buy a high performance car, you know that the tires are only good for 10,000km of wear and will cost an arm and a leg to replace a couple of times a year, the same way that people that drive 1969 Ford F-100 pickup trucks know that they can run them low on oil till the tappets make noise and slap some oil in them and have no loss of performance. The same person is less likely to own a Ferrari F430 and a Ford F-100, much like riders in the markets for a tweaky carbon hardtail and a steel hardtail, I don't think they're looking at converting steel hardtail riders to carbon bike riders. There's a place for all levels of performance of bikes in a product line, but if they're going to keep their WC racers competitive, and be able to sell bikes into the race oriented market, they've got to keep some leading edge development going. From my experience, they're doing a great job at the leading edge. I really like both my carbon Vertex and carbon Altitude.

    In the 2011 product line, there's a still alloy Elements, Altitudes and Vertex models with decent specs, and the Blizzard frame persists in a couple of forms. So for the people that aren't prepared to make the leap to carbon, there's still the conventional options.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DSFA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    810
    Quote Originally Posted by fokof
    I'm just curious to know who makes the frame I'm riding.
    Wouldn't you ?
    Seems to be Rocky Mountain.

    What FoCo29er said.
    Bikes=Sanity

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    543
    That's a while back for me to have to still agree with myself!

    I was just saying that carbon doesn't seem to be a practical proposition for the mass audience. I certainly wasn't arguing against the advances in suspension that the Altitude exemplifies, and in fact I'm surprised that the Element hasn't gone over to that design. I assume maybe the benefits aren't so great in a shorter-travel application, and may not be worth the weight penalty?

    There seem to be if anything fewer carbon bikes in the range now, and although you hail the stiffness of a carbon rear end, the Altitude and Slayer both have aluminium rear ends - and they need stiffness more than the Element does. I would guess the rationale for the carbon rear end for the Element is weight rather than stiffness, but happy to be corrected if I'm wrong. The stiffness is mainly in the design and the pivots, surely?

    What I regret is the passing of scandium. I don't know how it works, considering I read that scandium is just a 0.6% alloying element in so-called scandium tubing, but it seems to me to offer the best combination of weight, strength, price and durability.

    You said it yourself - you bought a Subaru 18 years ago. That's why people buy Subarus. If Subarus were liable to fall to bits and be unrepairable if you clipped a rock, and you wouldn't get a warranty replacement, I reckon most people wouldn't buy them.

  39. #39
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,004
    Quote Originally Posted by DSFA
    Seems to be Rocky Mountain.

    What FoCo29er said.
    Thanx guys for the constructive answer.
    It really helps me !
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  40. #40
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,105
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyinhove
    What I regret is the passing of scandium. I don't know how it works, considering I read that scandium is just a 0.6% alloying element in so-called scandium tubing, but it seems to me to offer the best combination of weight, strength, price and durability.
    My 2007 scandium Vertex Team was the dream ride, compared to alloy or steel, it was lighter than alloy and had better vibration damping than steel, and was waaaaay stiffer than my 2005 Blizzard frame (which would exhibit rear disc rub when cornering). It is nimble and snappy in handling.

    And then I rode that Vertex RSL with the standard modulus carbon and that was a game changer (paradigm shifter, jaw dropper, etc) it had the best vibration damping, was much stiffer and responded to every bit of pedal input, it was every improvement the scandium frame was, x10 better.

    My scandium Vertex is now the night time/winter time/tire test mule bike that usually has the lights mounted up all winter. The scandium Vertex was within $100 of the price on the carbon Vertex Team frame, the scandium frame sold for $1700 CDN and the Vertex Team RSL frame was $1795 CDN if I remember correctly.

    If you can find one of the scandium Vertex Team frames from 2007 or 2008, they are the nicest riding metal frame hardtail I've owned. Some of the other brands that have done scandium frames have had reliability/longevity issues with the scandium tubes but considering I'm up around 90kg, and have a lot of miles on my scandium Vertex, I don't think longevity is much of an issue (or I have just been very lucky). But the carbon Vertex RSL is a game changer, avoid riding one if you like your paradigm securely located where it is now.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  41. #41
    Subject to Whimsy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    403
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyinhove
    There seem to be if anything fewer carbon bikes in the range now, and although you hail the stiffness of a carbon rear end, the Altitude and Slayer both have aluminium rear ends
    If you saw my rear triangle on my Altitude you would quickly agree aluminum is the better choice. What with chainslap, tree, root & rock rubs and scrapes plus the odd incident of chainsuck, the rear of my Alti looks well used.
    I think if the rear was carbon I would have replaced it awhile ago.

    I think the suspension design is the reason for the increased stiffness more than material.

    As far as carbon as a frame choice, I have mixed feelings. It appears stiffer, looks nice, for some I suppose it rides better but in an AM or Trail setting, it's not necessarily the best choice.
    If you tend to wince when a rock strikes your bb or downtube area, prepare to grit your teeth fairly constantly when on a carbon frame.

    I don't know that there is any way to fully protect a carbon frame when "mountain biking" At some point you have to accept the fact there will be damage that doesn't look very nice and is relatively difficult to repair and probably not very cost effective.

    You also have that oh so priceless state of being called peace of mind.
    You don't get much of that with a carbon frame.

  42. #42
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,105
    The Altitude RSL changed from carbon seat stay to alloy seat stay because they didn't need the extra stiffness or +100gms of weight that carbon seat stay provided, it was stiff enough by design.

    It was the need for stiffness, not weight savings, that resulted in the carbon seat stay on the 2005+ Element and the 2007 SXC, that made a huge difference in stiffness over the alloy versions, but it weighed about 100gms more there as well.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •