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  1. #1
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    Slayer, 2011 vs 2013

    Looking at a lightly used 2011 upgraded to all X0 vs a new 2013.
    I like true tubless, so either bike needs a wheel change.
    I like the idea of the race face carbon cranks...
    I've read mixed reviews on the Fox suspenders on the 2011.

    the 11 is going to run 3000 the 13 3200, so cost does not factor.

    Thoughts?
    My bikes, Slayer 70 and Switch 2

  2. #2
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    oh, the bike will replace my '06 Switch which is all coil and absolutely rips DH... but I no longer shuttle in favor of earning my turns all the time now... how much will I miss the 7" Switch on the way down (rough/rocky at times rather steep) ?
    My bikes, Slayer 70 and Switch 2

  3. #3
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    I would personally go with the new one just so I could get the warranty. That would bea bigger draw for me than the fact the 11 has X0 parts.
    Tarekith.com

    '12 RM Slayer70, i9 Torch, Flow EX, XT Brakes, 5050 s3.

  4. #4
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    Go with the 2013, the warranty and the dropper post seals the deal.

  5. #5
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    Also the fork is now 170mm

  6. #6
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    Good call, the dropper is a huge benefit.
    Tarekith.com

    '12 RM Slayer70, i9 Torch, Flow EX, XT Brakes, 5050 s3.

  7. #7
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    Thanks guys, I went with the '13.
    The Lyrik, Monarch and XO 4-piston brakes along with the warranty did it for me.

    So, the wheels... tubeless ready... what is that all about?
    I currently have a couple sets of mavic SX wheels I think I will run.
    Just need to convert the rears to 142x12
    My bikes, Slayer 70 and Switch 2

  8. #8
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    Pretty sure the 2013 slayer 70 is tubeless out of the box

  9. #9
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    Re: Slayer, 2011 vs 2013

    Quote Originally Posted by shredjekyll View Post
    Pretty sure the 2013 slayer 70 is tubeless out of the box
    Nope.

    I have the 13 Slayer 70.

    Tubless ready just means you take out the tube, tape the rim, put in the goop, and go.

    No special mods or fiddling.

    No getto Tubless or split tubes etc...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by iscariot View Post
    Nope.

    I have the 13 Slayer 70.

    Tubless ready just means you take out the tube, tape the rim, put in the goop, and go.

    No special mods or fiddling.

    No getto Tubless or split tubes etc...
    Yeah I know what TR means, must depend on where you buy it from. Friend of mine got his off Jenson and it arrived tubeless.

  11. #11
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    Re: Slayer, 2011 vs 2013

    Quote Originally Posted by shredjekyll View Post
    Yeah I know what TR means, must depend on where you buy it from. Friend of mine got his off Jenson and it arrived tubeless.

    The TR response was for MikeH as per his previous post. MTBR is not all about you.

  12. #12
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    iscariot,
    So, the rim beads are set up for UST tires then?
    I've searched and cannot find any info on the wheelset as far as durability, weight, etc.
    How are you liking them?

    I just found out my SX wheelsets are too old to convert to 142mm.
    My bikes, Slayer 70 and Switch 2

  13. #13
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    MikeH.

    I'm not 100% sure about UST as I haven't tried UST on these rims, but the rims can be set up tubeless with the stock Conti MountainKings with very little prep or trouble.

    The tires: I was going to switch out to Maxxis DHF/DHR as those are my go to tires for the last 5 or 6 years. I decided to give the stock MountainKings a shot and they are not a DHF/DHR, but they are not bad either. The DHF/DHR are heavier with more rolling resistance, are stiffer in the sidewall, and drift into turns. The Mountain Kings are lighter, less rolling resistance, livable stiffness in the sidewall especially considering how light these tire ride, and don't drift into the corners as easily as the DHF/DHR.

    The rims: I usually run 721's/hope for the last 5 or 6 years. I couldn't find much info about the stock DTSwiss rims, but as far as I can tell they are the same as the DTSwiss 1750 rim (DT Swiss - EX 1750 Spline 26) but with different stickers. I was going to switch over to my usual 721/hope combo, but again, decided to give these stock rims a shot. They are lighter than the 721's but aren't terrible. The hubs are fine, and have decent engagement.

    The tires, hubs, and rims are still going strong after a season of resort riding, shuttling, and earning my turns riding. Haven't had to true or re-tension anything.

    I'm 5'11" 185# geared up for DH.

    The stock stuff on the 2013 Slayer 70 (rims, tires, hubs, cranks) adds up to about 5 or 6 pounds lighter than the weight I'd normally run, and I'm liking the lighter weight for the earn your turns riding/climbing that I do (mine is currently 30# with pedals).

    There is a difference at the bike parks and shuttling, but it is such a small difference, that the light weight is well worth the tradeoff IMHO.

    I'm trying to get down a quiver of one bike for DH/FR/ResortRiding/Enduro/EarnTurns/AM (and add whatever other trendy monicker that means anything other than weight weenie XC racing). This bike stock does all of these more than acceptably. In fact, I didn't think you could really have a quiver of one, and the Slayer has proved me wrong, and keeps surprising me with how capable it is for such a large spectrum of climbing and descending.

    With a few changes, its easy to get this bike down to 27# and have it still be fully capable for 90% of whistler type technical and DH runs, plus a killer climber.

    Did I mention this bike has no business climbing as well as it does? It outclimbs my 2009 XC bike, and most of the 26" wheeled non-race-oriented-XC bikes that I've tried more recently.

  14. #14
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    We are in the same boat.
    I have an '06 RM Switch that came stock at 43lbs. I run 2 sets of mavic SX wheels, one with 2.5 Minion DHF and DHR and heavy rotors for down hill and the other Conti race Kings and light rotors for everything else. I've got it down to 37lbs but it just isn't all that great for long climbs and 4+hr rides. My XC bike is a carbon hardtail and it beats me up too much.

    This bike is intended to replace both.
    Thanks for all your feedback, it is making me feel really good about my purchase... just waiting on shipping now.
    I'm 5'-7" and about 175 geared up... I went with a small (16.5").
    My bikes, Slayer 70 and Switch 2

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike H. View Post
    I'm 5'-7" and about 175 geared up... I went with a small (16.5").
    That's the right size for your specs. Same boat indeed. It is a bit more finicky to set up the air suspension when compared to coil, but once you nail the air pressure, the Lyrik DHRC2 and Monarch Plus RC3 are awesome. They are both marked with sag gradients, which is a good starting point, but not set in stone.

    At 185# :
    I run 70# air in the fork with high speed wide open and low speed 3 clicks from wide open, rebound is 3 to 5 clicks from full open (fastest).

    I run 175# air in the shock with rebound 1 click from full slow. This sounds effed up, but the range of rebound is narrow and with 1 click from full slow, the rebound is still really fast. I usually run the rebound on all my other suspension (different brands) at close to full open. I initially did this with the Monarch Plus RC3, but I was getting bucked on jumps and drops. It took me a long time to convince myself to close down the rebound that much, but it just works because of the very little rebound damping in this shock. I've read this is common around the internet, and that the 2014 Monarch Plus RC3 has twice the rebound damping.

    With this setup the fork is still a bit too linear for my taste and the rear shock is just about perfect. I'd like to get my hands on a few of the bottomless Pike tokens, which fit in the Lyrik, so that I could run a little less air (so I could get a bit more small bump sensitivity) and have it ramp up more at the end of the stroke for bigger hits. There are rubber bands that you can get if you want the shock to ramp up more in the end stroke, but really this thing is dialed.

    This (above) is all basically running 30% sag.

    If I run 25% sag, I run 80# in the fork and 190# in the shock, and the bike is a bit more high strung, but climbs better and is ridiculously playful with no chance of bottoming on the bigger hits; the fork and shock feel linear, really poppy and playfull, bottomless, and plush on all but retardo breaking bumps/small bumps.

    I switched back and forth throughout the season to try to figure out which setup I liked better and couldn't decide, since it depended on the terrain I was riding. So keep a few setups written down somewhere so you can dial it into where you like it. If I had to set and forget, I'd run 25% sag numbers and call it a killer ride.


    Note that the RockShox air pressures listed on the fork will set you up with about 20% sag, so if you want more sag/plush, its common to drop 10# from the air pressure that's recommended for your weight that's listed on the fork.

    Also both the fork and shock are speed sensitive damped, so the parking lot push doesn't tell you about how these perform at speed.

    Be sure to cycle the suspension after your put air in, but before you measure sag, as the positive and negative air chambers need to equalize. Then measure sag.

    The rapid rebound on these does work well and the suspension doesn't really pack up ever, regardless of how slow you're running the rebound. The compression on the rear shock has Rockshox Dual Flow, which also works really well. I've run the shock as low as 160# air and finally was able to bottom it out (the indicator band would come off the bottom of the shock) but it never felt like a really harsh bottom out.

    The fork also Dual Flow (I've run the fork at 55# air) and, again, finally was able to bottom it out but it never felt like a really harsh bottom out.

    Rockshox is on their game. I was a fox guy up until a few years ago when fox turned to ****. **** Fox. I'm glad RockShox has stepped up and is offering a product that keeps me happy, is generally lighter than fox stuff, just as stiff, and performs better than the older fox stuff, and is light years ahead of the new fox stuff.


    Places I typically ride (in no particular order): Moose Mountain pedal and shuttle (Kananaskis AB), Silverstar (Vernon BC), Kickinghorse / Mount 7 / Moonraker / Cedar Lakes (Golden BC), resort and trails in Fernie BC, and usually get out to Whistler / Shore ever other year, and I pedal Rossland / Nelson BC on the years that I don't go out to Whistler.


    The Slayer weighs just about the same as the Altitude that everyone was creaming over (within 1#), is more durable and burly, has an inch more travel, can take much bigger terrain and resort punishment, and climbs just as well. Seriously, this thing is an underrated, overlooked sleeper hit that lives up the name Slayer.


    Slayer, 2011 vs 2013-865854d1390974792-post-your-rm-shots-uploadfromtaptalk1390974793210.jpg

  16. #16
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    I like my Switch plush and planted (it runs like a trophy truck, sag at 35% out back and 30% up front), and am running pretty slow rebound out back, so I'll probably start by dialing all the rebound out of the Monarch.
    I've never ran air suspension (well, SID's and Reba's on the hardtail but that is a different animal), but I've heard so much positive on the Lyric and Monarch that I'm pretty committed on making it work... I've read the the RP3 on the '11 and '12 bikes runs through it's travel pretty easy so I'm glad to hear what you have to say about the Monarch. I'm really accustom to coil, so the linear feel should make me happy.
    My Switch is the perfect weapon on South Mountain (Phoenix AZ) if shuttling, but the shuttle scene has turned into a circus (my opinion) so I've been earning my turns for the last several years (and enjoying it even more than the shuttles)... and the Switch is killing me in the climb department. It'll do it alright, I'm just not strong enough to enjoy it any longer.
    Based on your experience I think I'll start with 160# out back and 55# up front and see where it gets me.

    I really appreciate all you comments/feedback/advice.
    My bikes, Slayer 70 and Switch 2

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike H. View Post
    I like my Switch plush and planted (it runs like a trophy truck, sag at 35% out back and 30% up front), and am running pretty slow rebound out back, so I'll probably start by dialing all the rebound out of the Monarch.
    I've never ran air suspension (well, SID's and Reba's on the hardtail but that is a different animal), but I've heard so much positive on the Lyric and Monarch that I'm pretty committed on making it work... I've read the the RP3 on the '11 and '12 bikes runs through it's travel pretty easy so I'm glad to hear what you have to say about the Monarch. I'm really accustom to coil, so the linear feel should make me happy.
    My Switch is the perfect weapon on South Mountain (Phoenix AZ) if shuttling, but the shuttle scene has turned into a circus (my opinion) so I've been earning my turns for the last several years (and enjoying it even more than the shuttles)... and the Switch is killing me in the climb department. It'll do it alright, I'm just not strong enough to enjoy it any longer.
    Based on your experience I think I'll start with 160# out back and 55# up front and see where it gets me.

    I really appreciate all you comments/feedback/advice.

    Those numbers sound right if you want to run it like a ground-hugging bulldozer DH machine. But be aware that given it's lighter weight and the way that both RockShox and air suspension run generally, it will be more poppy and playful than your heavier coil Switch even at 30% sag. It will also climb way better and descend way better.

  18. #18
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    Man the wait is killing me.
    2 days at customs, then delayed again in Portland for weather.
    If those wheels are indeed the EX 1750 Splines... I will be very happy. That's a nice light wheelset. 21mm inside is what my SX's are and they provide excellent tire profile for the 2.4 Conti's and 2.5 Maxis tires.
    My bikes, Slayer 70 and Switch 2

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike H. View Post
    Man the wait is killing me.
    2 days at customs, then delayed again in Portland for weather.
    If those wheels are indeed the EX 1750 Splines... I will be very happy. That's a nice light wheelset. 21mm inside is what my SX's are and they provide excellent tire profile for the 2.4 Conti's and 2.5 Maxis tires.
    Post pics when you get it!

  20. #20
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    Ta Da.
    It's all together, controls adjustments made, sag set...
    Slayer, 2011 vs 2013-p1050712-copy_zps443aad29.jpg
    My bikes, Slayer 70 and Switch 2

  21. #21
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    Re: Slayer, 2011 vs 2013

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike H. View Post
    Ta Da.
    It's all together, controls adjustments made, sag set...
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Awesome. Enjoy. Its a ripper.

  22. #22
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    Could not resist riding it out front of the house last night at 11:30pm in my PJ's and slippers. Ha.
    So, from the parking lot test, small is the perfect size, love the "upright", feels like my old XC race bikes with seat to pedal relationship. Cockpit is a little longer than my old RM Switch which will be very welcome on my 4+hr rides. I was worried that I might be laid out on top of the longer cockpit/stem but first impression is good. It is only slightly more laid out, but I still sit plenty upright which is good for my lower back and wore out shoulders. I was tempted to swap my 50mm Thompson stem before even riding, but I think I'll give the longer Atlas a try.
    Compared to my Switch, this thing explodes under pedal pressure.
    I do not like that the shifters are connected to the brakes. I like to run the shifters in bound. Hopefully I get used to this.
    I've never used a dropper post, been wanting one for a few years... I played with it once on the sidewalk and am already in love.
    I would agree the wheelset is the 1750 spline... I quite like them and will run with them. Nearly 1lb lighter than my SX wheelsets.
    I stuck my old Welgo pedals on it, but, am eye'n the RF Atlas pedals.
    Off to bike shop to get new multi tool that has torx for the sram shifter/brake pods... and to get a tubeless kit... tape and stems.
    My bikes, Slayer 70 and Switch 2

  23. #23
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    Re: Slayer, 2011 vs 2013

    Riding in PJs...I believe that most people call that Troy Lee Designs racing kit. Lol.

    Glad you're happy with the bike so far. The bike rides better the bigger and faster you go, but is still incredibly nimble and climbs like a goat.

    Don't be afraid to try 25% sag and watch the bike come alive at speed and over hudge hits.

    I know you like a different style setup, but after you get used to the bike at 30% sag for a month or so, try a month at 25%. If nothing else, the versatility of the riding characteristics that this bike is capable of will melt your brain.

    Such an under rated, under the radar bike.

    There is a small screw so that you can move the shifter a bit more inboard or outboard, independently of the brakes. Not sure what positikn yours are in but there is a bit of leeway. Like maybe 1cm.
    Last edited by iscariot; 02-13-2014 at 12:10 PM.

  24. #24
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    I bought the tubeless kits, much $$.
    Slayer, 2011 vs 2013-pho_tubelesskit_ohneverpack-1-.png

    But I'm starting to think all I need is tape and valves...
    Slayer, 2011 vs 2013-pho_tubeless_ready_kit_23mm.png

    any ideas?
    My bikes, Slayer 70 and Switch 2

  25. #25
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    Re: Slayer, 2011 vs 2013

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike H. View Post
    I bought the tubeless kits, much $$.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    But I'm starting to think all I need is tape and valves...
    Click image for larger version. 

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    any ideas?
    I haven't run these tubless myself but as far as I can tell, tubless ready means tape and valves and go ride.

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