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Thread: ritchey 2 X 9

  1. #1
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    ritchey 2 X 9

    Hi, i want to find photos about first 2 X 9 (or 2 X 10 not remember) 29 X 42 drivetrain by Ritchey with custom rear cog.

    thanks !

  2. #2
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    here you go.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    WANTED:NOS TIOGA SUSPENSION FRONT HUB in BLUE
    WANTED:89' DIAMONDBACK AXIS TEAM

  3. #3
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    I have the 9 sp shifters, but no extra rear cog, is it a flat cog or bent in some way?
    Experimental Prototype

  4. #4
    CS2
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    Quote Originally Posted by alohachiimoku
    here you go.
    Why would you want a double on a MTB especially when the industry went away from 46/48 big rings to 43/44?

  5. #5
    artistic...
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2
    Why would you want a double on a MTB especially when the industry went away from 46/48 big rings to 43/44?
    because triples ..well... never liked the concept.

    and we are her exactly because the industry you know..moved away... hehehe
    want: Ibis ti handlebar. suntour 31.8 front derr. bottom pull

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattias_Hellöre
    ...is it a flat cog or bent in some way?
    Yes, the cog is concave at the spline and then flattens out at the teeth.

  7. #7
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    And the shifters are 8sp spaced... the 9th cog sat pretty much flush to the spokes in the same way those clear plastic spoke protectors do behind cassettes. There was very little clearance between them. Enough to spin the freehub backwards but not enough to suck a chain in any longer.

    As to double rings... cannondale has is still using 29/44 setups on their bikes today.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2
    Why would you want a double on a MTB especially when the industry went away from 46/48 big rings to 43/44?
    Why not? And what does the big ring downsizing have to do with it? If anything, now that the bcd pattern is smaller it works even better. This kit was from the early 90s.

    A double works really well unless you have extended steep climbs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    A double works really well unless you have extended steep climbs.

    A double works really well unless you have extended super steep climbs

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    Quote Originally Posted by ssmike
    A double works really well unless you have extended super steep climbs

    the climb that came to mind is 4 miles long and takes one hour to get to the top. It averages 13%. DC has done it and has a good feel for what is steep I think. Maybe he can comment since Im not a good judge as its a "backyard climb" and my perception is probably off. All I know is the granny gear is a welcome part of the crankset for this particular trail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    the climb that came to mind is 4 miles long and takes one hour to get to the top. It averages 13%. DC has done it and has a good feel for what is steep I think. Maybe he can comment since Im not a good judge as its a "backyard climb" and my perception is probably off. All I know is the granny gear is a welcome part of the crankset for this particular trail.
    I shoulda used that little winky dude

  12. #12
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    If roadies can climb the alps with a 39/25 low gear...then a mountain biker can manage 4 miles of 13% with a 29/33 low gear (which is what the ritchey setup did... 29T ring with a 33T cog). The lowest road gearing today is still only a 30T ring and 27T cog, and their effective wheel diameter is about identical to ours, so the gear inches work out virtually the same.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

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    you forgot a few things.

    Quote Originally Posted by DeeEight
    If roadies can climb the alps with a 39/25 low gear...then a mountain biker can manage 4 miles of 13% with a 29/33 low gear (which is what the ritchey setup did... 29T ring with a 33T cog). The lowest road gearing today is still only a 30T ring and 27T cog, and their effective wheel diameter is about identical to ours, so the gear inches work out virtually the same.

    Yeah, but you forgot, roadies have perfect traction allowing them to stand up and pedal as obnoxiously as they want without slipping. On the mtb, sometimes you have to stay seated in order to keep the tire biting. You also have to pedal smoothly. On top of that, we have much more drag to fight and a tiny bit more weight to carry...

    But yeah, you could do any climb on a much harder gear than would be optimum, it would just be less efficient.

    So mtbs often necessitate seated climbing on the steep stuff, have substantially more drag, and more weight. Those things all require lower gearing than a road bike.

    On a semi-related note, Tomac was tested at the olympic training center as having one of the smoothest pedal strokes ever tested. Even over all the roadies. They thought that it was due to his riding on slippery dirt surfaces requiring smooth power delivery.
    Last edited by Fillet-brazed; 05-26-2008 at 01:41 PM.

  14. #14
    artistic...
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssmike
    A double works really well unless you have extended super steep climbs
    nevermind... FB is rigth on this one.
    want: Ibis ti handlebar. suntour 31.8 front derr. bottom pull

  15. #15
    memento mori
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    I run 29-38 to 11-34,climb steep New England stuff all day long.13% isn't that steep.I did a 20% stretch on my road bike with a 39-23 low gear sunday.It hurt but I made it.For me too low a gear takes too long on climbs;I can pound up a hill and feel better than spinning like a mad-man.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    the climb that came to mind is 4 miles long and takes one hour to get to the top. It averages 13%. DC has done it and has a good feel for what is steep I think.
    Yeah, that was steep, especially riding high in the switchback turns. I used everything the bike had.

  17. #17
    Hit The Road Cyclery
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    You want steep? Check this out (and if you can't get a low enough gear, the guy in the video can probably hook you ):

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by DAVID J
    I run 29-38 to 11-34,climb steep New England stuff all day long.13% isn't that steep.I did a 20% stretch on my road bike with a 39-23 low gear sunday.It hurt but I made it.For me too low a gear takes too long on climbs;I can pound up a hill and feel better than spinning like a mad-man.

    yeah, based on the minimal riding Ive done in New England I wouldnt think a granny gear would be useful. For the short climbs there's no need.

    Weve got a climb semi-local called Pacific Summit Grade and I think its 27% at its steepest points. Ive done that with 39-27 and its tough but certainly doable.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleCentury
    Yeah, that was steep, especially riding high in the switchback turns. I used everything the bike had.

    I just went out and did the climb yesterday evening. Its not crazy steep, but it would be seriously uncomfortable to do it seated with a double. Especially the last mile or so.

  20. #20
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    I do my riding in the forest in a 2x9 setup.
    DA 7700 12-27rear.
    Own tuned chainnrings with 29 and 42t front.

    Never had run out of low gears.
    Experimental Prototype

  21. #21
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    I use a 24/36 double ring up front. No use for anything bigger on a 29er...

    I'd rather have the bailout gear than gear for top end speed. Off road which is going to be used more?
    G
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  22. #22
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    here is a bunch of 2x9 stuff ...

    all parts are new
    175mm compact Crankset with 29/44 rings
    2 extra 28t rings, one 42t ring
    one ti 33 t rear cog
    one steel 33t rear cog
    2 aluminum cassette lock rings
    2 front 2x9 shifters
    2 rear 2x9 shifters
    2 titanium bb spindles
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails ritchey 2 X 9-2x9.jpg  


  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2
    Why would you want a double on a MTB especially when the industry went away from 46/48 big rings to 43/44?
    It's funny reading this old post in light of SRAM's new XX drive train that was recently introduced. I guess SRAM things that a few people are interested.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  24. #24
    Hi.
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    The XX drive train's biggest chainring is a 42. I had a Cannondale Scalpel with a Hollowgram Si crankset that was a 29/44 double. Needless to say, with a double up front you are going to feel it after a couple miles of climbing.

  25. #25
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    2 x 9

    I've been riding 2 x 9 since it came out in 1998, it was stock on my Ritchey. I find that I shift alot less, and I haven't had 1 single "chain suck". My chainstay is still prestine.

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