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  1. #1
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    Problem sealing Ritchey tire with Stan's NoTubes

    I've got a pair of Ritchey Evolution 2.1 tires that I attempted to seal this weekend with Stan's NoTubes. This is the first time i've ever used the prodcut. I'm trying it on a pair of NoTubes ZTR355 rims with the yellow tape. I can get the tires to inflate with no problems. But when I try to seal the tire to the rim by shaking the rim as shown in the video, I still get a ton of bubbles coming up. I used 1 1/2 scoops of the sealent. I've tried shaking the tire about 6-8 times, letting it sit for 15-20 minutes, and still don't see any noticable difference.

    Is getting the product to work just a matter of persistence? Or could I be doing something wrong? (definitely a possibility!)
    Last edited by pronghorn; 03-31-2008 at 10:30 AM.

  2. #2
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    Yes, it can sometimes take days to get them to seal properly, but it is REALLY worth the wait. Do the shaking thing and let the tire sit on one side then the other over a period of hours/days. Check your breads with soapy water once they start to seal up. Don't go riding until they are all nicely sealed up.
    It can seem like it'll never seal, but be persistant and you'll be rewarded eventually.
    Cheers,
    Steve

  3. #3
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    after inflating to 60 psi or set and do a bit of wiggling, grab a round garbage can(or something so they sit perfectly flat) so the goop has time to seat along the seam. if they dont seat right away leave em like this for a few hours on each side.

    After that try one more 60psi fill up and you should be set. The

  4. #4
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    I've found a few things to be helpful...with Stan's rims you are not sealing the bead to a rubber strip right??? but just to the metal rim lip?

    Assuming that, then it should be similar to my experience mounting non-UST tires on a UST rim with Stan's.

    First, use a lot more Stan's to initially seal a new setup than you use subsequently. I put a minimum of 2 full scoops in there (4 oz?). The extra is needed because you have so much to seal that first time.

    Second, make sure that you've properly shaken the bottle before pouring your sealant. The sealing particles in the mixture are heavy and sink to the bottom very quickly. You shake well, turn upside down and shake again, then quickly pour. This is key or else your sealant won't seal.

    Third, pump the pressure up really high while sealing as the escaping air will help to force more sealant in to those smaller areas that otherwise would take longer to get sealed.

    Just do it over and over again. A few times I've been unable to get a good seal only to have the problem solved right away upon adding another 2 oz. of sealant.

  5. #5
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    Thanks a lot for the advice! I haven't had a chance to get back to the tires yet to hopefully complete the setup, but will do this weekend. Once more question: other than being able to tell where the leaks are, what role does the soap and water play in the sealing? Any?

  6. #6
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    Yes, i'm not using the rubber rim strip, but beading the tire to the metal rim.

    Stan's video's are definitely helpful, but it seemed a bit strange to me how many people have said to shake the rim and let it sit for an hour or two for the sealent to do its work. Stan makes it sound as if only a few minutes are necessary. I actually sent him an email, and this was his response:
    Inflate the tire to 35psi then shake the tire like I do in this movie but only for a few seconds. Then lay the tire flat like I do. Let is sit just a few minuets then repeat. Do this until you have all areas sealed they will seal. No need to let the tire sit for more than a few seconds or a minuet. By then the sealant would have run down in the sidewall

  7. #7
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    I don't think letting it sit for a long time like that has much value...that is unless you have tires with a porous casing and you see that it's seeping out of the sidewalls of the tire. These are slow leaks that could benefit from some time.
    The main area of seal is along the bead and that happens fairly quick.

    I would argue that Stan's advice of 35 psi would take longer to properly seal than 60psi.

    I also get to a certain point and then I find the biggest leak and turn the wheel and shake so as to target that particular spot (@ 5-10seconds) then move on to the next noticable spot. After that I just give the whole wheel a shaking all around (@ 60 seconds total).

    Sitting for hours isn't needed.
    I have also noticed that once sealed when I leave the tire overnight it might be completely deflated. When I inflate it again, there are no apparent leaks. After 2-3 days of doing this it usually stops and holds the seal as well as tubed tires.

    The value of the soap and water in the process is that it cuts down on friction of the rubber bead to the metal rim and allows the bead to seat more quickly and more thoroughly making the initial inflation and sealing much easier and quicker. My first and second time didn't use this method, but my 3rd wheelset did and it was very much easier.

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