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  1. #1
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    New question here. Ways to break down scar tissue

    So I'm now seeing a chiropractor (Thumbs of Death) to work on not only my posture but the scar tissue from my previous broken wrist (8 months ago). She's doing active release then I go home and ice. She says there's A LOT in there. Since I can feel it, I know she's right.

    What do you do to help break down scar tissue? I'm working on the exercises, typing regularly, and cardio (improved blood flow) whenever I can.

    I was thinking a surgery to scrape it out would be a good idea, but I've heard mixed results. I'd like to get as much of this broken down before it's gets impossible..

    Thoughts? What are you experiences? I know wrist is different than say the knee, but please share
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  2. #2
    conjoinicorned
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    please don't get surgery....

    personally i would stick with the ART, and if you feel it's not quite enough try to find an experienced Graston technique practicioner (Graston is like ART but with steel tools, a little more intense....)

    i've had way too many "minor" surgeries, and they really add up over the years. i've been getting quite regular ART/Graston/general chiro over the last 5 years, and i truly believe it's saved me from several more surgeries.

    for the record i have had knee, shoulder, and elbow issues.
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  3. #3
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    I had a badly borken leg many years ago, ended up with never quite regaining all of the upward flex in the ankle.

    Last year I tried what is called prolotherapy. They stick novacain and water into the scar tissure, with a needle. Anyway this naturopath said it would work on my scar tissue.

    It did I gained probably 5 to degrees more flex, (couple with stretching, I was doing the stretchs but it just wasn't working for me).

    The have all types of homeopathic things they can add, but the basic concept is your body doesn't know it needs to heal up that area, by injecting the water novacain in there it attracts the attention of the immune system and bob's your uncle.

    He said that when the needle went in if it was scar tissue, it would feel roough like burlap, he missed the first time, but second time bang on really rough sliding sensation as the needle went iin and it sure helped.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    I had a badly borken leg many years ago, ended up with never quite regaining all of the upward flex in the ankle.

    Last year I tried what is called prolotherapy. They stick novacain and water into the scar tissure, with a needle. Anyway this naturopath said it would work on my scar tissue.

    It did I gained probably 5 to degrees more flex, (couple with stretching, I was doing the stretchs but it just wasn't working for me).

    The have all types of homeopathic things they can add, but the basic concept is your body doesn't know it needs to heal up that area, by injecting the water novacain in there it attracts the attention of the immune system and bob's your uncle.

    He said that when the needle went in if it was scar tissue, it would feel roough like burlap, he missed the first time, but second time bang on really rough sliding sensation as the needle went iin and it sure helped.
    This sounds very useful. What type of doctor did this? I have to know who to ask around here
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  5. #5
    conjoinicorned
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    http://www.prolotherapy.org/

    i looked into it myself, but was not convinced. maybe i should try it and see for myself....
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

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    +1 on Prolotherapy look at www.HighSierraMedical.com

    Injections of Collagenase will break down scar tissue

    Transverse massage over the area

    Range of motion exercises

    Surgery will only create more scar tissue....bad idea

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Duende
    +1 on Prolotherapy look at www.HighSierraMedical.com

    Injections of Collagenase will break down scar tissue

    Transverse massage over the area

    Range of motion exercises

    Surgery will only create more scar tissue....bad idea
    While Incline Village is closer to the Bay Area, I was hoping to find a list of doctors who would do this. I can only find websites that advertise for you to come to them.

    That has me concerned. I already do the transverse massge and ROM exercises. I've heard about the injections before, I just don't know what KIND of doctor does the procedure: dermatologist, orthopedic surgeon, what?
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  8. #8
    Bodhisattva
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    In the sake of fairness I have to tell you that prolotherapy is experimental and is considered sham therapy by most healthcare practitioners. You'll have a hard time finding a reputable physician to recommend it.

    I'd stick with various forms of massage therapy, physical therapy & ROM. Things will improve with time.
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  9. #9
    Double-metric mtb man
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    How about ways of breaking down surficial scar tissue too? I've got some wonderful gravel-rash I'd like to get rid of
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Squeaky Wheel
    In the sake of fairness I have to tell you that prolotherapy is experimental and is considered sham therapy by most healthcare practitioners. You'll have a hard time finding a reputable physician to recommend it.

    I'd stick with various forms of massage therapy, physical therapy & ROM. Things will improve with time.
    +1 for doing it the old fashioned way!

    in '04 I shattered my left wrist as a result of a motorcycle wreck... most of my carpals and both distal ends of my Ulna and Radius were badly "mashed" and the Ulnar styloid process (the notch on the outside of your wrist) actually splintered off and traveled down to the back of my hand... anyways it was a mess and I was told I would probably only gain 50% of my motion back...

    Well 6 months and 2 metal plates and a dozen screws later I was in physical therapy 3x a week, sometimes nearly passing out because of the pain, I finished PT w/ nearly 80% of my original ROM back... nerve damage took MUCH longer to heal... Now I would say I have 99.5% of my ROM back and the scar tissue has gone down w/ time and usage... Nerve damage is mow only a lack of texture sensation on the pads of my fingers

    I would suggest, as well as relentless PT and TIME, look into certain vitamins and minerals that help rebuild damaged tissue. The body can clean up an amazing amount of crap if it has the right ammo... I can't remember anything offhand but I'm sure a good chiropractor and/or physical/occupational therapist would have suggestions.

    good luck w/ the rehab!
    "Listen, strange women lyin' in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government!..." -- Dennis the Peasant

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho Mike
    How about ways of breaking down surficial scar tissue too? I've got some wonderful gravel-rash I'd like to get rid of
    From what I understand, you can talk to a dermotologist about superficial scars. I'll worry about those when I can break up the stuff internal.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by havnmonkey
    +1 for doing it the old fashioned way!

    in '04 I shattered my left wrist as a result of a motorcycle wreck... most of my carpals and both distal ends of my Ulna and Radius were badly "mashed" and the Ulnar styloid process (the notch on the outside of your wrist) actually splintered off and traveled down to the back of my hand... anyways it was a mess and I was told I would probably only gain 50% of my motion back...

    Well 6 months and 2 metal plates and a dozen screws later I was in physical therapy 3x a week, sometimes nearly passing out because of the pain, I finished PT w/ nearly 80% of my original ROM back... nerve damage took MUCH longer to heal... Now I would say I have 99.5% of my ROM back and the scar tissue has gone down w/ time and usage... Nerve damage is mow only a lack of texture sensation on the pads of my fingers

    I would suggest, as well as relentless PT and TIME, look into certain vitamins and minerals that help rebuild damaged tissue. The body can clean up an amazing amount of crap if it has the right ammo... I can't remember anything offhand but I'm sure a good chiropractor and/or physical/occupational therapist would have suggestions.

    good luck w/ the rehab!
    Man, I know about the pain today.. my chiro (Thumbs of Death) really worked on the scar tissue in my wrist today. I think she went easy on me last week. I swear I was gonna pass out today.

    So I've been doing a weekly massage from my Chiro, doing self-massage, and lots of stretching right now. She told me to wait on the strengthening (wrist curls, etc) until more scar tissue is broken down.

    The other thing she recommended: lots of water. It really helps the body flush the crud out.

    My current ROM is more than the doc expected, but I'm still well short of what I'd like, but it's something I can live with because I can still mountain bike
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Squeaky Wheel
    In the sake of fairness I have to tell you that prolotherapy is experimental and is considered sham therapy by most healthcare practitioners. You'll have a hard time finding a reputable physician to recommend it.

    I'd stick with various forms of massage therapy, physical therapy & ROM. Things will improve with time.

    Hmmmh fully funded, by my health care.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    Hmmmh fully funded, by my health care.
    Not in the US.
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  15. #15
    jgk
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes
    While Incline Village is closer to the Bay Area, I was hoping to find a list of doctors who would do this. I can only find websites that advertise for you to come to them.
    I had prolotherapy done by Dr. Marina Bulatov, in San Ramon. I think she also works out of Oakland too. Not covered by insurance. I had 3 visits for lower back pain. Nada. For a wrist, I'd give it a try.

    Here's the number I have:
    510 981 0216
    You'll probably have to leave a message for her to call you back. Be prepared for the Russian accent.

  16. #16
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    The type of doctor that might do prolotherapy is an osteopath. As I understand it, the premise behind this type of therapy is that the injections will help build ligament/tendon strength. Not sure if this will apply to you. I'm considering it for my knee, my insurance covers visits to an osteopath but not prolotherapy. Here's a list of doctors that do it, but you will have to research which ones are better/more experienced. http://www.getprolo.com/

  17. #17
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    Apply vitamin E to the area. Either buy a bottle of liquid or break open capsules.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by teleken
    Apply vitamin E to the area. Either buy a bottle of liquid or break open capsules.
    For scar tissue internal to my wrist?
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes
    For scar tissue internal to my wrist?

    it still may help a bit... But I know there are some supplements geared towards tissue growth that are taken internally.
    "Listen, strange women lyin' in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government!..." -- Dennis the Peasant

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes
    For scar tissue internal to my wrist?
    It is a long shot, but it might transfer into the damaged area if it's not too deep.
    E can help rebuild tissue and cells (skin,nerve,etc.)

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by teleken
    It is a long shot, but it might transfer into the damaged area if it's not too deep.
    E can help rebuild tissue and cells (skin,nerve,etc.)
    Thanks for the advice. It's helping with the skin scars, but the scar tissue is around the little bones in my wrist, so I don't think it'll get that far.
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  22. #22
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    Good job! Great Suggestion!

    Quote Originally Posted by ferday
    please don't get surgery....

    personally i would stick with the ART, and if you feel it's not quite enough try to find an experienced Graston technique practicioner (Graston is like ART but with steel tools, a little more intense....)

    i've had way too many "minor" surgeries, and they really add up over the years. i've been getting quite regular ART/Graston/general chiro over the last 5 years, and i truly believe it's saved me from several more surgeries.

    for the record i have had knee, shoulder, and elbow issues.
    You are right! Finding a good chiropractor who does ART makes all the difference.

    Apparently the scar tissue from my broken wrist healed funny around the little wrist bones (8 of them) that has reduced my ROM and caused me pain in the back of my hand.

    It feels sooo much better after the ART (but man, it was really painful to have her break it down) this morning.

    I just needed to find someone who got deeper into the scar tissue than my PT did.
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  23. #23
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    Have you ever heard of or tried Rolfing/Structural integration. Its a form of deep tissue myofascial release therapy that can help break down and or realign the scar tissue. It worked great for me

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