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  1. #1
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    tweeked hamstring, rest? how long off bike?

    had a big weekend, we went kayaking in the morning and then did a 3+ hour ride in the arvo with some fresh young riders who were pumping, I was already stuffed after the paddling.

    My hamstrings are a bit tight and the left one I have tweeked. what is the best recovery?
    I have been doing very gentle stretches and got a massage but it is still sore after 4 days.
    should I stay off the bike this weekend and wait for it to recover or will it be ok t do a gentle ride?
    have another massage booked for the morning.

  2. #2
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    If you're like me and dont like going to the Dr, then give it another week or so to heal. You should be able to do *real* light biking to help loosen the hammy up a bit, but if after another week or you feel any additional sharp pain go to the Dr.

  3. #3
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    Muscles love heat, so keep it warm as you can. Cold will only intensify the spasm. Stretching is the ultimate treatment for muscle pain, since most of these cases the muscle is tense and therefore, shortened. When the muscle is injured it tenses up and if provoked goes into spasm, causing intense pain.

    Acupuncture, done by a doctor trained at UCLA or a trigger point injection into the point of spasm can work wonders, in the most severe cases.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Duende
    Muscles love heat, so keep it warm as you can. Cold will only intensify the spasm. Stretching is the ultimate treatment for muscle pain, since most of these cases the muscle is tense and therefore, shortened. When the muscle is injured it tenses up and if provoked goes into spasm, causing intense pain.

    Acupuncture, done by a doctor trained at UCLA or a trigger point injection into the point of spasm can work wonders, in the most severe cases.
    Outta curiousity, what are you certified to do? Yer job lists you as "healer."
    MTB4Her.com: mountain bike site for women, by women

  5. #5
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    Heat

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Duende
    Muscles love heat, so keep it warm as you can. Cold will only intensify the spasm. Stretching is the ultimate treatment for muscle pain, since most of these cases the muscle is tense and therefore, shortened. When the muscle is injured it tenses up and if provoked goes into spasm, causing intense pain.

    Acupuncture, done by a doctor trained at UCLA or a trigger point injection into the point of spasm can work wonders, in the most severe cases.
    Hamstrings are an interesting muscle group. I would advise on a few different things. Rest is still your best friend. I would ok you for some very light riding to get the blood/wastes pumping through/out of your muscles. If swelling or significant pain persists, I would use ice as needed. Heat is good to warm up your muscles for sure.
    A couple of other points to consider. Are you drinking enough fluids and taking in enough calcium, electrolytes, and protein? All will help in the healing process.

    Stretching is good, but easy to get too aggressive and flare up or reinjure the muscle again. Sometimes, you are better off letting that muscle adhere down a bit to stabilize that area.

    I would definately hold off on any kind of TP injection as this is completely differnt. Trigger Points are often spinally related. TP's are typically from a spinal segment causing its related muscle(s) to become hypertonus and "knotted".

    As far as tight hamstrings, there is very limited quality literatue that indicates that stretching or heat can actually lengthen a tight hamstring. Have you ever noticed that "tight people" can stretch all the want, but never seem to loosen up? This is likely because there is a spinal component to it. Muscles do what the nerves tell them to do and nerves come off the spine. Often, people will also have a lower Lumbar issue facilitating that segment and the related Hamstring and Piriformis muscles.
    The person that tells you that their neck and shoulders are always tight no matter how many massages they get or how much heat they use all have one thing in common, posture. As soon as you fix posture and stabilize the Cervical spine, their tension finally goes away.

    So, rest it as needed, slowly progress back into light activities, listen to your body, if it tells you to stop, then stop! Light stretching can help, but don't go too crazy with it. Use heat to warm it up, but use ice if is flared up or swollen at all.

    Good luck, let us know how it comes along.
    BoiseBoy

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