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  1. #1
    I'm more of a dog person
    Reputation: unclekittykiller's Avatar
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    Feb 2006
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    Three Herniated Discs!

    I just learned that I have 3 herniated discs in my lumbar spine. 2 are bulging out and compressing nerves and the other one is a Schmorl node. I am seeing a specialist in a few days but I have been doing some research and found an interesting surgery procedure called Percutaneous Laser Discoplasty. Basically just a probe stuck into your back with a laser inside and it is used to heat the disc and "shrink" the buldge back into the vertebrae. No cutting, no loss of disc material. Sounds pretty positive. Anyone have this procedure performed on themselves? Looking for some feedback on success, recovery, etc.
    Last edited by unclekittykiller; 04-21-2008 at 08:23 AM. Reason: wrong title

  2. #2
    boba fett on a bike
    Reputation: Bounty Hunter's Avatar
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    Nov 2006
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    I'm recovering from a disc protrusion with a bone fragment between L4/L5 on my left side. The disc protrusion was hitting my sciatic nerve and it was probably one of the worst pain I've experience in my life. Thankfully my body responded well to the cortizone steroid injection.

    I wish you luck. If a cortizone injection is possible then I'd recommend trying that first along with physical therapy if you can rather than surgery right away. My neuro surgeon told me that if he did MRI's on everyone then at least half or more would have some disc protrusions. You can only really tell when it starts hitting nerves and causes pain.

  3. #3
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    May 2007
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    skeptical

    most people with herniated discs (maybe 90% or so) don't really need any surgery. Anti-inflammatories and some rest and they usually get better by 3 months. However if you have progressive weakness or bowel/bladder issues that is a different story. Either way, I would be skeptical on such new treatments with lasers and heat until the jury is in. Does it seem like a great idea to put a hot poker near your spinal cord? Don't know. A couple of years ago people thought it was a good idea to use heat to shrink the shoulder capsule and ligaments to prevent instability - well that didn't work out so well as it turns out.

  4. #4
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    I have 2 herniated discs and some other issues that go with it. I went with the cortisone shots first (actually had 6 today to tide me over till my next radial frequency treatment in August). The cortisone works for about 30-45 days for me but the radial frequency lasts for about 8 months. Much better IMO than having any type of surgery.

    Good luck mending your injury.

  5. #5
    I'm more of a dog person
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    what a difference a couple of months makes

    it's been a couple of months now since i learned of my injury and ive been pretty aggressive with treatment. ive seen a few doctors and received 2 steroid epidural injections. big help for a while. once the swelling around the injured area had mostly subsided things seemed to get a bit better. still had reoccuring leg pain and some back pain though. then my doc told me something that really got me on the right track. apparently, bulging discs in that region generally don't cause back pain, they cause leg pain (according to him). he said that the pain in my back was probably being caused by atrophied muscles. so i did some research and learned that the muscles that are supposed to do the supporting of the spine are called the lumbar multifidus. when the spine receives an injury that causes pain, these muscles are "turned off" and the superficial muscles of your torso take over to sort of "lock up" your spine and prevent the spine from flexing too much and experiencing more pain. problem is, these lumbar multifidus don't know when to turn back on, even when the site of injury may be completely healed. they apparently need to be "trained" to turn back on. so how do you train your deep spine supporting muscles? i started doing what i thought was the right way to do this, back hyperextensions. i used two different types of roman chairs, one parrallel to the ground and one at a 45 deg angle. i liked the 45 deg machine because it caused less hamstring strain and seemed to produce more results, but i was still feeling pain in my back. so i did some more research, this time on roman chairs, and thats when i found what i've been looking for for so long. its called the medic back trainer and its made by kettler, a german company. its a roman chair made specifically for rehab of the lower back. its exactly what i needed to help me get back to the state of health i need to be to pedal effectively. instead of focusing your range of body motion at the hips like most roman chairs, it forces you to flex and use all the vertebrae in you lower back, thus exercising muscles that you cant with other roman chairs. its only been a little while now since ive started hyperextension exercises correctly, but i can now bend and move my back without pain in ways i haven't been able to in years. i know this sounds like an infomercial but i'm not affiliated with this company at all. i just thought that some of you out there who enjoy mountain biking as much as i do but are hampered by back pain would be interested in a possible cure. if any one is interested in more info about this, you can check out http://www.backtrainer.com/ and http://www.backachepro.com/back-pain...for-back-pain/

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