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  1. #1
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    Prostatitis and riding

    Hopefully not TMI for anyone, but I had some questions for others with this problem. I was recently diagnosed with a form of prostatitis after a couple months of some fairly uncomfortable symptoms. After visiting my doctor and doing some research of my own, we (my doctor and I) have come to the conclusion that it was caused by riding bikes. I'm on antibiotics for the next 3 weeks and am not allowed to ride a bike or do any heavy lifting/exercising for the next 5 weeks.

    I ride a fully rigid bike, and guess I sit down more than I realize. I have a fairly padded saddle, not paper thin, but not something you'd find on a hybrid either. I also ride with padded cycling shorts. My rides consist of anything from 45 minutes to 3 hours and vary in terrain. Some trails are very rough, some are pretty flat.

    From the reasearch I've done I have come up with 3 solutions so that this prostatitis doesn't come roaring back in the future, as my doctor has warned it may.

    1. Tilt saddle slightly more forward. I already run the nose tilted slightly down, but I've read just a bit more may help take some pressure off that area of my body. I could also force myself to stand a bit more than I usually do. This is obviously the cheapest option, but I don't want this problem to come back right away if this doesn't work, then I'm off the bike for another 5 weeks.

    2. Buy an even more padded saddle. This option doesn't cost much, but I just don't know if I want to throw a big ol' padded seat on my bike. I like what I'm running right now (Specialized Targa 155mm), it has broken in and is quite nice. I'm never sore from my current saddle, but it's obviously caused some problems. If you suggest this option, what saddle would you suggest? I've seen some very padded WTB saddles, and have even considered a gel hybrid saddle that's fairly slender, still.

    3. Buy a suspension seatpost. I've always considered getting something like a Cane Creek Thudbuster, but have read mixed reviews. This is the most expensive option, but may be the best.

    I'm worried of this coming back in the future. My doctor warned that once I've had it, I have a much higher risk of getting it again and suggested a new "hobby" if I have many issues in the future. Since cycling is much more to me (and all of us) than just a "hobby", I want to ensure that I don't have any more issues in the future.

    Please post up any experience you've had with prostatitis or any suggestions you have for me. My ears are open and any information is greatly appreciated

  2. #2
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    I don't see you mentioning probably the most expensive option... going to a full suspension bike? I think you're on the right track with looking at the tilt of the saddle, but ultimately it might be the type of riding you're doing and the type of bike you're doing it on. I had a buddy who got bad Prostatitis from his road bike riding (had to do the whole anti-biotic thing like you )... seems it was too many hours in the saddle, without moving around that much. He was also having bad back problems, when mountain biking (his bike at that time was a hardtail). Ultimately getting a full suspension mountain bike seems to have solved both problems for him.

  3. #3
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    I had considered that as an option, buying a full suspension, but want it to be the last resort. I would think getting a bigger saddle AND a Thudbuster would be just as effective. I've still got some time to decide what to do, unfortunately.

  4. #4
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    Check out pudendal neuralgia. I went through the whole prostatitis thing a few years ago and it never made sense as a diagnosis but was the only thing that resembled my symptoms. Now it's back again and it appears to be pudendal neuralgia which has a more dismal outcome. I started a different thread here. Good luck.
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  5. #5
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    I ride a hardtail, with a thudbuster, and a selle italia flight saddle.

    I've got a similar issue myself. Part of it is, I'm old. But the other part is that I've been riding for years on saddles that put pressure where I don't want or need it. I've had one operation already and recently passed on a second one. I just don't want to go through another one when there's no guarantee of a fix.

    My guess is that more padding won't help. You want to support your "sit" bones without adding pressure to your forward area. A padded saddle will compress where your two bones contact it from body weight, and additional padding will cause pressure where you are trying to avoid it.

    Have you looked at ergonomic saddles? They come in different widths to accommodate your seat and have a channel down the middle to alleviate pressure where you don't want it. I'm about to try one myself. Some of the lbs have them, but most of the good ones have to be purchased online.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Centurion_ View Post
    I ride a hardtail, with a thudbuster, and a selle italia flight saddle.

    I've got a similar issue myself. Part of it is, I'm old. But the other part is that I've been riding for years on saddles that put pressure where I don't want or need it. I've had one operation already and recently passed on a second one. I just don't want to go through another one when there's no guarantee of a fix.

    My guess is that more padding won't help. You want to support your "sit" bones without adding pressure to your forward area. A padded saddle will compress where your two bones contact it from body weight, and additional padding will cause pressure where you are trying to avoid it.

    Have you looked at ergonomic saddles? They come in different widths to accommodate your seat and have a channel down the middle to alleviate pressure where you don't want it. I'm about to try one myself. Some of the lbs have them, but most of the good ones have to be purchased online.
    I've always ran Specialized saddles. With their body geometry technology I've never had a single issue in the past. I've used numerous saddles from Specialized and neither worked worse or better than the other. I'm wondering if my problems are due to riding a strictly a fully rigid bike for the past 11 months, which is why I think a Thudbuster may be a great option.

  7. #7
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    IMO, padding is the wrong direction to go. Padding will create pressure points all over the saddle and you'll be locked into a position without the ability to easily shift around if need be. I was having real painful issues with saddle contact in the "unmentionable" region and ended up trying a Kontact saddle built by a BioEngineer guy in Washington. 30 day return guarantee if it didn't work for you. I really like it.

    There are others such as Cobb saddles that have the grooves elevated that you might want to check out, too.

    I don't think your post is TMI by any means. You have me wondering if perhaps I may have done some damage when I got back in the saddle back around May. I was experiencing some significant discomfort when in the saddle for a short period and shrugged it off as just getting accustomed. After just looking up your diagnosis, I have a couple of the symptoms though they could easily be unrelated so I'm thinking maybe a visit to my friendly urologist is in order.

    I'd be interested in hearing more about the symptoms you have experienced that led to your discovery.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for posting the info on the Kontact saddles.
    I may give one a try myself.

  9. #9
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    I have had lots and lots of perineal numbness and pain after rides and tried lots of saddles. I believe you are going down the wrong track with the padding and the targa is a low tech example of specialized saddles.

    The padding you need should be in your Knicks / shorts not in your saddle as far as I can gather . Look at saddles with cutouts, like selle italia slr, SMP, specialized phenom etc etc.

    I started with every fizik saddle made, then eventually did a straw poll amongst my 10 or so group of riders, and the guys who were least likely to ever think of their saddle were riding specialized bikes with phenoms, so I bought one, and recently another.

    Get a saddle with a big cutout where it matters.

    Now if this was discovered via a prostate blood test - as it often is, never get a blood test within a few days of a big ride, or on the morning after you have ejaculated. I did, and my test said I probably had prostate cancer - I had to live with this for a few months untill a further test said I was normal, and after I had another mans finger up my arse! It's the only sex I have ever regretted that on.
    E,.....

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    IMO, padding is the wrong direction to go. Padding will create pressure points all over the saddle and you'll be locked into a position without the ability to easily shift around if need be. I was having real painful issues with saddle contact in the "unmentionable" region and ended up trying a Kontact saddle built by a BioEngineer guy in Washington. 30 day return guarantee if it didn't work for you. I really like it.

    There are others such as Cobb saddles that have the grooves elevated that you might want to check out, too.

    I don't think your post is TMI by any means. You have me wondering if perhaps I may have done some damage when I got back in the saddle back around May. I was experiencing some significant discomfort when in the saddle for a short period and shrugged it off as just getting accustomed. After just looking up your diagnosis, I have a couple of the symptoms though they could easily be unrelated so I'm thinking maybe a visit to my friendly urologist is in order.

    I'd be interested in hearing more about the symptoms you have experienced that led to your discovery.
    Most of my problems regarded urination. I didn't have any pain or discomfort while riding, I actually am very comfortable with my saddle/shorts. No odd pressures or anything of the sort. But I had an increasing problem urinating. I could stand at the toilet for a couple minutes and barely get a drop out sometimes. Always felt like I had to go, never felt like I went enough. Just felt like something was blocking it from coming out. I'd be up through most nights going to the bathroom to just stand there, unable to go. It started out very slowly and eventually got worse. I didn't have really any pain, burning, etc while going, just couldn't go. I think if I waited any longer to see a doctor it would have gotten much worse and more painful, though. Basically, after many questions and a rectal exam, my doctor found my prostate was inflamed and explained it was hindering my urination. He asked me what I do and as soon as I mentioned cycling he said that was most likely it. I've been on cipro for the past 6 days or so to treat it and the difference so far is unreal. Sounds weird, but you forget what it's like to just go in the bathroom, pee and come back out without issues! I've got 15 days left on the meds, then a couple weeks of recovery to get back to riding. Cipro apparently weakens joints, muscles and really weakens tendons...and I've been feeling it. Just the usual stuff around the house has been making my body feel pretty sore, so I'll definitely need some time to build up strength before riding again so I don't really injure myself. Let me know if that answers your questions!

  11. #11
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    Since I am experiencing no pain or discomfort while riding with my current saddle, do you guys suggest a new saddle? Or try adjusting mine differently? (lower seatpost, tilt forward slightly) I'm worried that since I had no pain while riding and got prostatitis, I won't be able to see it coming again in the future if I get it again.

    What are your thoughts on a Thudbuster? On a fully rigid bike, I think (and hope) that would take out any of the small vibrations and big impacts that may have caused these problems for me. I wonder if, on a bike with no suspension, I'd need more than just a new saddle with a big cutout.

  12. #12
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    Stopped by the LBS today to look at saddles. They only stock Specialized (besides lower end stuff for hybrids), so I was looking at and considering either a Phenom or Romin. They had a "test" Romin saddle, so I'll be giving that a shot once I get back on the bike. It has pretty much no padding at all, but a very large cutout, so I'm hoping it will help out. I'm also going to get a Thudbuster, I've always wanted one, and think that will help smooth out the ride of a fully rigid bike with a Romin saddle.

    My plan is to try out the Romin and get a Thudbuster. I'd run my saddle a little bit lower than I am now and also tilted forward slightly. I'll decide if the Romin works for me, and I may go for the Phenom if it doesn't. How does this sound to you guys? I really appreciate all of your help here!

  13. #13
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    THis discussion is good. As I get older, riding is more difficult, at least to ride like before. Pain in diff areas comes up now.

    Difficulty urinating, if not a urinary tract infection, in men is often caused by an enlarged prostate. The trick is diagnosing the cause of the inflammation/enlargement.

    If its from riding and saddle time, after a few days/weeks of no pressure there, it "should" go away..IF its the saddle time. But if it doesn't go away and you have more symptoms at night, such as frequent night urination, then it could be from age-related prostate enlargement, which can be treated with medications. This diagnosis requires a urinalysis for elevated PSA (Prostate-specific antigens).

    I've been curious lately about the relationship, if there is any, to saddle time and prostate or testicular cancer (Think Lance Armstrong, I'm not saying his was related to riding, but just curious).

    I do know for myself that I have a mild peroneal nerve palsy. My little toe on one foot cannot flex. The nerve damage occurred from a long ride with little standing from the saddle. Afterwards, the bottom of my foot was warm and my toes were numb. Not good. I know stand frequently to avoid further damage.

    Oh well...
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    Stopped by the LBS today to look at saddles. They only stock Specialized (besides lower end stuff for hybrids), so I was looking at and considering either a Phenom or Romin. They had a "test" Romin saddle, so I'll be giving that a shot once I get back on the bike. It has pretty much no padding at all, but a very large cutout, so I'm hoping it will help out. I'm also going to get a Thudbuster, I've always wanted one, and think that will help smooth out the ride of a fully rigid bike with a Romin saddle.

    My plan is to try out the Romin and get a Thudbuster. I'd run my saddle a little bit lower than I am now and also tilted forward slightly. I'll decide if the Romin works for me, and I may go for the Phenom if it doesn't. How does this sound to you guys? I really appreciate all of your help here!
    I had a tuope that I bought off ebay that's very similar to the romin. It was the saddle that convinced me specialized was the right saddle for me ( except the henge - that thing is deadly). However I broke the side of the saddle in a few months.

    When I told the local store about it, the first thing he grabbed was a phenom - built for mountain biking so flexes a little and lasts much longer. The road saddles are a little more about firmness to provide power on the stroke - that's the specialized spiel anyway.....

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by myitch View Post
    THis discussion is good. As I get older, riding is more difficult, at least to ride like before. Pain in diff areas comes up now.

    Difficulty urinating, if not a urinary tract infection, in men is often caused by an enlarged prostate. The trick is diagnosing the cause of the inflammation/enlargement.
    Right on.

    I have to get up to urinate 3-4 times a night. EVERY night. Can't remember when I last had a solid 7 or 8 hours of sleep, but it's literally been years.

    I can tell you guys this though. Do everything you can before you even CONSIDER surgery. It is extremely painful and puts you down for several weeks. I had an operation 4 years ago and am now right back where I was before I had it. Spent a night in the hospital, and the bill was over 15 thousand bucks. Enough for several really nice fs bikes.

    I am assuming the OP has a temporary condition though. In which case I would think a change of seat might make a big difference.

    Perhaps your prostate is slowly becoming larger as you age, and the seat which, for years, hasn't been a problem, now is the problem due to a slowly enlarging prostate which now is being compressed where before (when it was smaller), it wasn't. Should that be the case, a different saddle with a cutout might do the trick.

    Such as the Kontact saddle perhaps? They sell for $120, but the guy will take it back and do a refund if returned undamaged within 30 days. Beats buying a bunch of seats that don't work and being stuck with them.

    As for the thudbuster...mine certainly helps. But if the problem is pressure from your saddle on an enlarged prostate...it may not be enough. Plus, they look like crap and will add at least a pound to your bike.

    I would not do the extra padding. If you need relief from pressure...extra padding will not help, and probably only make the problem worse.

  16. #16
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    this i believe is a good thread for me...since after losing my foot i haven't ridden or finished my bike builds. maybe my GT idrive builds and the right saddle will be very beneficial.
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  17. #17
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    I just want to share my brief experience with prostatitis.

    During Thanksgiving weekend 2012 I exerted myself and urine entered the vas deferens. I actually felt the pop at the time, and hoped it would be nothing. A few days later the infection set in. The infection seemed to travel from my epididimus to the prostate, and back again. I saw a doctor after a month of it not clearing up (The discomfort was remarkably mild and completely gone on some days) and he said there was not much he could do about it and the condition would likely remain. I started taking saw palemeto and vitamin C regularly it seemed to help, but it never solved it completely.

    In late February I came across a forum posting from person with a similar experience and he was able to track it back to being chronically dehydrated. It was winter, we were both taking pseudoephedrine for sinus problems, drinking coffee, etc.. His solution was simply to hydrate. Apparently the prostate is a sponge-like organ and is very sensitive to fluid levels in the body. If the prostate drys out, even a little, it can harbor an infection pretty easily.

    Anyway.. I thought I would give it a try. Within the first 12 hours of drinking 3-4 liters of water the symptoms went away. I tried to drink 2-3 liters of water before noon and another 2-3 in the afternoon and evening. I did this for probably 4 to 6 months. What was really weird about the experience was if I missed drinking water I would feel the dull ache again. In the fall of this year I was able to taper off the drinking and not have the symptoms return.

    Some doctors also recommend frequent flushing of the prostate fluid during this time.. so you can have your wife help out with your treatment as well.

    I don't know if this matches your condition but it's easy to try and it may help. You shouldn't need to change anything on your bike, but a good saddle is always nice regardless. Bonne chance.

  18. #18
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    So...not good news. 4 days off Cipro and pretty much all of my symptoms are back, but sporadic. Has anybody had this issue?

  19. #19
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    Damn, sorry to hear that. Hopefully you can get that figured out and soon.

    I just saw my Urologist on Wednesday. This thread had me thinking about some things that have changed in the recent past regarding urgency and low back pain I've been experiencing so I made an appt. I'll have to say that Prostatitis check was one of the most uncomfortable experiences I've had in a Doc's office. It's one thing to check for size as during a typical exam but DAMN, the rest of that procedure, even though it was relatively quick, was full of pure suck. My mtbr handle was most appropriate during that gig! Good news, I don't have it. Knowing what I know now about that exam and as uncomfortable as that was, I'd do it again if need be and would not recommend anyone put it off if they suspect an issue.

  20. #20
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    After doing some more research, I am thinking my symptoms are partially caused by my diet, sleep pattern and stress levels. Haven't really eaten anything but crap food lately (Christmas time...), and haven't been sleeping well. I found a few pages online listing foods that are good and bad to eat. Found out that spicy foods are a big no-no, as well as alcohol and some other crap. And I eat about 75% of what was considered bad for those with prostatitis. Since my last post a day ago I made sure to get better sleep and eat very well. So far I'm noticing small improvements. From other research I've done, it looks like I'll pretty much be stuck with this for the rest of my life and I can "manage" by making sure I eat and sleep well. I'm hoping it won't affect riding too much, because nearly everything I've recently found out says no riding at all once you've had it. I'm pretty bummed that I'm going to be stuck with this, but at least there are ways to manage. I still won't be able to ride for a few weeks. I'm hoping by then I'll be eating well, not drinking alcohol and with the Thudbuster seatpost and different saddle I may be able to ride without problems again.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    Most of my problems regarded urination. I didn't have any pain or discomfort while riding, I actually am very comfortable with my saddle/shorts. No odd pressures or anything of the sort. But I had an increasing problem urinating. I could stand at the toilet for a couple minutes and barely get a drop out sometimes. Always felt like I had to go, never felt like I went enough. Just felt like something was blocking it from coming out. I'd be up through most nights going to the bathroom to just stand there, unable to go. It started out very slowly and eventually got worse. I didn't have really any pain, burning, etc while going, just couldn't go. I think if I waited any longer to see a doctor it would have gotten much worse and more painful, though. Basically, after many questions and a rectal exam, my doctor found my prostate was inflamed and explained it was hindering my urination. He asked me what I do and as soon as I mentioned cycling he said that was most likely it. I've been on cipro for the past 6 days or so to treat it and the difference so far is unreal. Sounds weird, but you forget what it's like to just go in the bathroom, pee and come back out without issues! I've got 15 days left on the meds, then a couple weeks of recovery to get back to riding. Cipro apparently weakens joints, muscles and really weakens tendons...and I've been feeling it. Just the usual stuff around the house has been making my body feel pretty sore, so I'll definitely need some time to build up strength before riding again so I don't really injure myself. Let me know if that answers your questions!
    Ok, I'm late to your party here but an enlarged prostate (Benign prostatic hypertrophy)Enlarged Prostate (BPH) - WebMD is a condition that effects about half of the male population starting around the age of 40 in some cases, but ins companies will say 50. Your symptom of waking in the night to pee is very common for this condition. One drug doctors will prescribe for this is Avodart, my insurance told me I was to young to have this condition and wouldn't cover it (100.00 per month). My Dr is also extremely knowledgable about non-pharmaceutical methods and as an alternative recommended a daily intake of Quercitan, Beta-Sitoserol, and Chelated Zinc some people will also use saw-palmetto but that didn't help me at all. I had the same issues as you and was on my bike 8 to 12 hrs a week. that was about 7 years ago and all of those symptoms are gone, I ride a hardtail. I'm no dr but that cipro regimant he put you thru seems totally wrong.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by dickeydoo View Post
    Ok, I'm late to your party here but an enlarged prostate is a condition that effects about half of the male population starting around the age of 40. Your symptom of waking in the night to pee is very common for this condition. One drug doctors will prescribe for this is Avodart, my insurance told me I was to young to have this condition and wouldn't cover it (100.00 per month). My Dr is also extremely knowledgable about non-pharmaceutical methods and as an alternative recommended a daily intake of Quercitan, Beta-Sitoserol, and Chelated Zinc some people will also use saw-palmetto but that didn't help me at all. I had the same issues as you and was on my bike 8 to 12 hrs a week. that was about 7 years ago and all of those symptoms are gone, I ride a hardtail. I'm no dr but that cipro regimant he put you thru seems totally wrong.
    How old were you when you first started noticing issues?

  23. #23
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    As an update, I've been doing some more research and things are definitely looking up from last week. I've found that symptoms coming back for a short while after cipro are common. They've gone away now, but I'm still not back to 100%. As I described it to some friends, things still just feel "sensitive" while urinating. Sometimes I'll have slight issues going, sometimes slight issues keeping a strong stream, sometimes feeling like I have to go again soon after, but it all feels like part of the healing process, and that's what I'm finding is the case while researching online also. I'm eating better, sleeping better, avoiding certain foods and drinking tons of water, and besides peeing A LOT more often, I'm feeling much better. I'm still nervous about what riding will bring, but I'm going to give myself a couple more weeks before riding. I'm definitely going to ease into it. The cipro really did weaken my body like my doctor said it would, so I'm hoping a couple small paved-trail rides will help get me back in the swing of things. The Thudbuster and new saddle should help. I've now realized that my old saddle wasn't set up perfectly, either.

  24. #24
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    43, maybe off and on a couple years before that.

    I have multiple friends who followed this same routine with success.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by dickeydoo View Post
    43, maybe off and on a couple years before that.

    I have multiple friends who followed this same routine with success.
    The difference here is that I'm 21...I'm not "supposed" to be having prostate health problems yet.

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