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  1. #1
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    Plantar Fasciitis

    Injured the left foot nearly two months ago. It was somewhat healed (or so I thought) until my latest ride/hikeabike through desert washes and ravines filled with sand and gravel and all sizes of rocks.

    So it's back to the podiatrist next week.

    But I was wondering how any of you that have dealt with this have handled it. I use eggbeater pedals. Switched to the Candy's for a platform to ease stress on the foot after the initial injury. I'm just wondering if a larger platform pedal (such as the mallet) would lessen stress on the arch once I start riding again. Or maybe just a large non clipped pedal for the left foot?

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    I use a sole brand molded insert in all my shoes to avoid that issue. I don't think pedals are as much the issue as using flexible sole riding shoes. There are a series of stretches and exercises for PF and you're probably going to have to make those part of your daily routine for a while.
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  3. #3
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    Physical therapy, less working on my feet on concrete, stiff cycling shoes with fancy insoles, weight loss, running a couple times a week.

    I use Speedplays on my road bike. I don't think pedal size matters as long as my shoes are stiff enough.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Centurion_ View Post
    Injured the left foot nearly two months ago. It was somewhat healed (or so I thought) until my latest ride/hikeabike through desert washes and ravines filled with sand and gravel and all sizes of rocks.

    So it's back to the podiatrist next week.

    But I was wondering how any of you that have dealt with this have handled it. I use eggbeater pedals. Switched to the Candy's for a platform to ease stress on the foot after the initial injury. I'm just wondering if a larger platform pedal (such as the mallet) would lessen stress on the arch once I start riding again. Or maybe just a large non clipped pedal for the left foot?

    Any thoughts?
    I had the same issue. Got injections and they worked for months. The pain returned to my left foot. My wife got me something called yoga toes (I think she got them at Walgreen's under another name) I started using them while watching TV and they actually worked very well. I am 95% pain free. The other 5% is bearable.

  5. #5
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    Plantar Fasciitis

    Strasbourg sock FTW
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  6. #6
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    My massage therapist eliminated mine in no time with some serious calf stretching which relieved the tightness of the tendon inflaming the nerves where they cross in the arch of your foot. I had suffered with it for a few years. Walking was painful. I think it took 3-4 sessions of her stretching it with me doing a bit of stretching on my own at home in between. Drs prescribe a number of income generating treatments including orthotics that all cost way more than stretching and massage.

    Not trying to be cynical, but in general modern medicine is built around money generating courses of action. This same phenomenon exists when seeking treatment for tennis elbow and ITBS. The best course of action doesn't generate more than a single office visit for the Dr. so they are trained in other treatment options and for the most part I think they believe in them. If Drs in the audience would like to disagree with my take, they are welcome to do so. Feel free to pm me. Meanwhile the OP can cure his issue without the need for an insurance claim and trying to figure out how to make orthotics work in all his different shoes.

    As an example, take tennis elbow, which is a form of tendonitis. The problem with healing tendons is that there is so little fluid and blood flow compared to muscles so the healing process is quite slow. The appropriate treatment is to avoid further strain or overuse but keep the area moving to promote blood flow in the area. The three most commonly prescribed treatments are anti inflammatory drugs, compression wraps, and cold compresses with numerous followup visits. These treatments provide temporary pain relief but...... All three treatments serve to reduce blood flow in the area and can lead to increased healing times or no healing at all.

    I'll stop there but only to spare y'all my further rants, not because I don't have dozens of other examples.
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  7. #7
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    Hey thanks for the advice and suggestions. I guess this is a result of years of running, cycling, and standing and walking on concrete at work.

    I have orthotics already. I'm going to see if doc will give me another injection this week, then rest it for awhile and start stretching the calves much more than I was. I already stretch for 20 minutes after rides and weight work outs. My podiatrist gave me some specific stretches for the calf last time, but I kind of neglected them in favor of a more general stretching program. I'll check out the Strasbourg sock as well.

    Thanks again guys.

  8. #8
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    Rest them too.

    I guess I didn't mention it in my earlier post, but I think a week or two of really resting an injured whatever is important, and I've worked back from a pretty low level when I've returned.

    In my mid-20s, I had a persistent knee injury. I'd wait until it felt better and then get back on my bike and hammer out 20 miles right away. Of course, I caused the injury to flare up. It wasn't until I cut back to three thirty minute rides a week and started working up that I really got better.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
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    Ya, I hear ya. The initial injury happened over three months ago. It was much better. I was beginning to ride more. It was starting to hurt again after re introducing leg work into my program which was aggravating it some, and then going out on what was supposed to be (and was for the most part) an easy two hour ride. Only...getting on and off the bike in the sand and rocks many times over and especially walking in that stuff...re injured it.

    So now I guess I get to focus on upper body and core strength for the next couple of months. Cause I sure won't be doing much riding.

  10. #10
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    my wife had that and she had great success seeing a chiro that does active release therapy. Fixed her quick and no relapse, good luck.

  11. #11
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    Got an injection Tuesday and some stretching exercises to do. Doc sez to wear my shoes with my orthotics all the time, ice it and stretch the calf and achiles tendon several times a day. And lots of rest. I'll be asking my chiropractor about the release therapy. And the yoga toes socks. I do hate just sittin around, but at least I'm retired and no longer have to earn a living. So I can do that.

    Thanks again to all who posted.

  12. #12
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    There is a wrap that emits electro magnetic energy which promotes blood flow, bringing nutrients with it to heal the small tears in the fascia. It is called BFST (blood flow stimulation therapy). Cold therapy is also very beneficial. Make sure to put a cold compress on the bottom of your foot/feet after any activity on them. This will help with the pain, but will also reduce any internal inflammation.
    Plantar Fasciitis Treatment by King Brand

  13. #13
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    Active release on your calves and poplitues muscle...
    Graston on the lower portion of your achilles tendon
    IFC / ICE on the calves
    golf ball roll out your arch of your foot -- 95% of my patients PF are caused by their calves.
    Sleep / sit watch tv with foot brace that pulls your foot up your leg (tiny stretch on calves) , this will help with the first step in the morning pain
    ICE calves
    roll your foot with a frozen pop bottle
    orthotics and or supportive shoes
    if you have the cash, shockwave therapy done right works great, painfull as **** though
    best of luck
    Oakville Chiropractor - Nottinghill Family Chiropractic
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  14. #14
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    Thanks Doc. Wish I lived near Oakville. You'd be the guy I'd go see.

    Smacked the foot hard yesterday balancing on my bike trying to adjust fork sag. Hurt worse than when I injured it. Haven't been riding at all in nearly two weeks.

    Copied your suggestions down and will print them out to refer to.

    Thanks again!

  15. #15
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    I have struggled with this off and on since I was 5 years old. It usually only takes small changes for it to go away. But, it can take a long time for those small changes to work. I use gel inserts in all my shoes and when I am having problems I use cushioned heal cups.
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  16. #16
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    Active release (aka physio squeezing the **** out of your foot/calf)
    Stretching frequently - I usually do about 10-15 short stretch bursts during the day
    Calf strength - Stationary weights (foot not moving) and active loading (sprints etc.)

    I haven't got rid of mine but all this at least lets me still ride comfortably. Say goodbye to long time in saddle.

  17. #17
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    I definitely agree with the active release and the calf stretches, but please please be careful when stretching the plantar. Stretching the plantar is what usually causes plantar fasciitis in the first place, so just make sure not to overdo it or it will actually cause more damage. Because it acts as a support for the full weight of your body, you don't want it stretched to the extreme. I actually commonly recommend not stretching during the recovery period...but I know most prefer to do so.

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