Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    ride like you stole it
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    681

    numb hand problem

    O.K. so I've been noticing that my hand go's numb when I'm out riding its only my left hand and at first I thought it was the bumpy trails but now its happening even on the smooth hardpack. I was wondering if anyone had experience with this and might have suggestions on what to do.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    72
    I'm not a doc, but I have numb hands riding due to carpal tunnel. Try either Ergon grips and a good glove that has padding on the outside of the palm (I use specialized enduro gloves) It helps but you should get it checked out if you are real concerned.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: California L33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    699
    Ergon grips with built in bar ends helped me. The grips are just better, and the bar ends allow you to change hand positions, which you should do every couple of minutes on longer rides. When you're riding make sure you're not putting strain on your wrists. They should be straight ahead, or with the hand rotated _down_ just a bit. This keeps pressure off the carpel tunnel, but it also takes conscious effort. It's natural to allow the hands to tilt up as you lean on the bars for a long period.
    To the troll mobile, away...

  4. #4
    breathing helium
    Reputation: cocheese's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,096
    Different grips such as ESI chunky or Ergons may help. A bar with a more ergonomic angle may help too, such as the Jones H-bar or On ne Mary bar. Gloves like the Specialized body geo are nice too.

  5. #5
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,436
    numb hands while riding is very, very rarely (read "virtually never") carpal tunnel syndrome, but rather is guyon's canal syndrome. guyon's canal syndrome is caused by the compression of the ulnar nerve through the guyon's canal and results in pain/numbness in the hands/fingers. the guyon's canal is located on the outer edge of the palm and is the tunnel formed by ligaments between two small bones in the wrist (the pisiform and hamate) under which the ulnar nerve passes. the ergo grips and glove padding on the outer palm support and cushion the guyon's tunnel and reduce/prevent pressure on the ulnar nerve.

    conversely, the carpal tunnel is located at the wrist just BEHIND the heel of the palm, so one would have to ride with their wrists on the bars to develop carpal tunnel syndrome from riding. but even if someone had already developed carpal tunnel syndrome via another avenue it is relatively unlikely that riding would aggravate it as there is little to no pressure being put on the carpal tunnel while riding. also, carpel tunnel syndrome generally causes pain to radiate up the arm to the elbow and as far up as the neck, whereas guyon's canal syndrome is generally localized in the hand itself.

    concentrate on better body mechanics for starters. dont ride with your weight concentrated on the outer edge of the palm, a very common biomechanical mistake is to slightly roll the hands to the outer edge of the palm. also, get a good glove with gel padding/support for the guyon's canal (the specialize bg's are excellent). if you still are experiencing discomfort try a set of ergo grips.

    if at this time you still arent getting enough relief go to a different bar with radically more sweep such as the mary, fleegle, origin space bar, titec h-bar (alloy version of the jones), bontrager big sweep, etc. and the pain will most likely subside because you are no longer compressing the guyon's canal and thus no longer irritating the ulnar nerve.

    of course, going to a bar with a more radical sweep will help right off the bat and will most likely alleviate the pain immediately, but some people refuse to try them. they insist on sticking with either a flat bar or riser with a 6 degree or so sweep despite the fact that a more radically swept bar is more ergonomically correct for not only the hands/wrists, but for the elbows and shoulders as well.

    although i am, admittedly, one of the people who still ride mild sweep risers (despite knowing better), i have a set of the titec h-bars and origin space bars on a couple of my bikes and they are both super comfy. tried them on my fixed gear mtn bikes because they offer a different kind of control and climbing leverage. just havent put them on my freewheeling bikes yet because i, like most of us, am a creature of habit and im used to risers having grown up riding dirt bikes and so forth. but then again i dont have pain in my hands either. but the day i do all my risers will prolly get scraped for h-bars.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    90
    Ergon grips have helped me. Now if only they could make a seat for numb balls.

  7. #7
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,925
    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    numb hands while riding is very, very rarely (read "virtually never") carpal tunnel syndrome, but rather is guyon's canal syndrome. guyon's canal syndrome is caused by the compression of the ulnar nerve through the guyon's canal and results in pain/numbness in the hands/fingers. the guyon's canal is located on the outer edge of the palm and is the tunnel formed by ligaments between two small bones in the wrist (the pisiform and hamate) under which the ulnar nerve passes. the ergo grips and glove padding on the outer palm support and cushion the guyon's tunnel and reduce/prevent pressure on the ulnar nerve.

    conversely, the carpal tunnel is located at the wrist just BEHIND the heel of the palm, so one would have to ride with their wrists on the bars to develop carpal tunnel syndrome from riding. but even if someone had already developed carpal tunnel syndrome via another avenue it is relatively unlikely that riding would aggravate it as there is little to no pressure being put on the carpal tunnel while riding. also, carpel tunnel syndrome generally causes pain to radiate up the arm to the elbow and as far up as the neck, whereas guyon's canal syndrome is generally localized in the hand itself.

    concentrate on better body mechanics for starters. dont ride with your weight concentrated on the outer edge of the palm, a very common biomechanical mistake is to slightly roll the hands to the outer edge of the palm. also, get a good glove with gel padding/support for the guyon's canal (the specialize bg's are excellent). if you still are experiencing discomfort try a set of ergo grips.

    if at this time you still arent getting enough relief go to a different bar with radically more sweep such as the mary, fleegle, origin space bar, titec h-bar (alloy version of the jones), bontrager big sweep, etc. and the pain will most likely subside because you are no longer compressing the guyon's canal and thus no longer irritating the ulnar nerve.

    of course, going to a bar with a more radical sweep will help right off the bat and will most likely alleviate the pain immediately, but some people refuse to try them. they insist on sticking with either a flat bar or riser with a 6 degree or so sweep despite the fact that a more radically swept bar is more ergonomically correct for not only the hands/wrists, but for the elbows and shoulders as well.

    although i am, admittedly, one of the people who still ride mild sweep risers (despite knowing better), i have a set of the titec h-bars and origin space bars on a couple of my bikes and they are both super comfy. tried them on my fixed gear mtn bikes because they offer a different kind of control and climbing leverage. just havent put them on my freewheeling bikes yet because i, like most of us, am a creature of habit and im used to risers having grown up riding dirt bikes and so forth. but then again i dont have pain in my hands either. but the day i do all my risers will prolly get scraped for h-bars.
    I often see the controls adjusted so that riders ride with their wrists bent. Being a CT sufferer myself, I'm kind of aware of these things.

    Would it not be plausible for improper adjustment of the shifters/brake levers (rotated such that the wrists are bent significantly) to impact the nerves in the carpal tunnel? I was told that a lot of CT sufferers sleep with their wrists bent.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: California L33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    699
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj
    I often see the controls adjusted so that riders ride with their wrists bent. Being a CT sufferer myself, I'm kind of aware of these things.

    Would it not be plausible for improper adjustment of the shifters/brake levers (rotated such that the wrists are bent significantly) to impact the nerves in the carpal tunnel? I was told that a lot of CT sufferers sleep with their wrists bent.
    I think monogod is correct that it's the ulnar nerve that's most often affected in cycling (I stand corrected if I implied otherwise), but I know from experience (and know of others) who have had CT problems from cycling. It happens for me when I get lazy and I look down and see my hands bent like I'm typing incorrectly, arms drooping, hands up. And if you put the controls in the wrong position, you can be forced to hold your hands incorrectly to access them.
    To the troll mobile, away...

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    34

    I had the same problem

    I had pain in the palms of my hands for about a year on my XC bike and my road bike. It got to the point I wanted to stop riding.

    My opinion....
    Do things that take weight off of your hands. You may not end up in the "textbook" correct, LeMond position, but if you are comfortable, you will enjoy riding pain/numbness free.

    Suggestion for the saddle... (I did this, and it helped, but did not solve my problem)
    As for your saddle, check that it is NOT tilted nose down, set it level, or if you can not get it level due to a notched seatpost angle adjustment, go up a half a notch from level. Slide the saddle back on the rails to a more rearward position. Doing this will get your saddle and legs supporting more of your weight.

    Suggestion for the brake levers...(This helps somewhat)
    Move the levers in toward the stem so that you only use your index finger to brake most of the time, but can still grab it with two fingers when needed. If you ride XC mostly, then rotate the levers such that in your normal riding position, you can extend your finger straight out to the brake lever without having to reach it up or down. Then,move the shift levers in towards the stem as far as they can go and find a rotation position that allows easy shifting from your normal seated position.

    Handlebars and cockpit length. (Ultimately, this is what fixed my problem)
    I completely solved my problem by shortening my cockpit (shorter steeper stem) and raising my grips (taller bar). I used to ride with a 4 inch drop from my seat to my grips and I was fairly stretched out too. Now, my grips are about an inch drop from my seat and I brought the grips back almost two inches so that a lot more of my weight is supported by my saddle and my hands have little weight on them. My hands are fine now.

    I carry more weight in my feet now and have found that my bike handles much better than before too. I also find decents easier and found that after a little adjustment time, my climbing is fine too.

    Good luck with it....

  10. #10
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,436
    i apologize if i gave the impression that carpel tunnel syndrome (cts) rarely affects cyclists or that cycling never exacerbates cts; but rather my point was that cycling as a base or root cause of neuropathy generally results in guyon's canal syndrome (gcs) rather than cts.

    true cts is the irritation of the median nerve and/or inflammation of the ligaments of the wrist resulting in pain/tingling/numbness that persists even when not engaged in any activity. simple irritation of the median nerve resulting in temporary numbness/tingling in the fingers/hand while riding is not cts but is the result of compression or irritation of the median nerve through the carpal tunnel, and is usually the result of improper hand/control placement.

    any vibration (road or mtb) can irritate both the median and the ulnar nerve, which is why gel tape and padded gloves help tremendously on road bikes and thicker grips (i.e. oury) and padded gloves help on mtb's. another way to alleviate medial/ulnar irritation on a mtb is to use gel road bar tape and wrap it 2 or 3 layers thick on your bars. kills any vibration (vibration will be more noticeable on rigid and to a lessor extent ht bikes than on fs rigs) and cushions both nerve canals wonderfully. with 3 layers the larger diameter will more evenly distribute pressure around the palm and lessen the amount of grip force needed on the bars. guys with larger hands should really try this, it works wonders.

    even with a squishy fork or double boinger a tremendous amount of stress and pressure can be exerted on both nerves, and gel road tape will really help. not only have i had great success using this method myself, but also with people for whom i have set up flat and riser bars who wanted relief but who did not want to go to a more radically swept bar.

    yes jeff, you are right on the money that a lot of cts sufferers sleep with their wrists bent at severe angles. this often times is the cause of carpel tunnel syndrome and yes it can be exacerbated while cycling.

    and yes jeff & cal are both on target for supposing that incorrect control placement can impact the medial nerve thus causing problems for those who have already developed or are developing cts. for those who already have cts or who have a genetic predisposition for it proper control and hand position on the bike is important because the median nerve will be much more sensitive to any type of compression, irritation, vibration, etc.

    for those who already have cts a bar with radical sweep is HIGHLY recommended as this will drastically reduce the impact and pressure on the carpal tunnel and guyon canal, and thus the median and ulnar nerves. it will also greatly reduce the misplacement of hands due to laziness or fatigue, and again control placement is important even on these bars.

    the easiest way to tell if you are affecting the ulnar or median nerve is by which part of the hand is numb/tingling. thumb side half of the palm, thumb, and first two fingers are from the median nerve (carpel tunnel); while the other half of the palm and last two fingers are from the ulnar nerve.

    for cessation of irritation of the median and ulnar nerves here are a few suggestions...

    • professional bike fit. this cant be stressed enough. too many myths on how to set up a bike are out there (i see them on these forums CONSTANTLY) causing people a great deal of pain and discomfort. a professional fitter will fit the bike to you taking complaints of pain into consideration, and will adjust the bike accordingly rather than simply place you in a default "perfect" position.
    • rotate your controls down to a 45-55 degree angle as you are viewing the bike from the side. it may feel a little funny at first, but it will place your hands in a more ergonomically correct position and take a great deal of stress off both the ulnar and median nerves.
    • a more upright seating position. there is no need to be all stretched out with your bars drastically lower than your saddle. this can be done by...
      • using a higher rise bar
      • using a higher rise stem
      • using a shorter stem
      • placing your stem higher on the steer tube
      • moving your saddle to the correct position. many ride with it way too far back/forward.
      • using a zero offset seat post
      • make sure youre on the proper frame size. too long of a top tube will stretch you out too far.

    • thicker grips (oury), ergo grips, or gel road bar tape
    • gel gloves (esp. the specialized bg gel)
    • radically swept bars such as the ones previously mentioned

    also, do ONE THING at a time and give it several rides rather than the shotgun approach. that is the only way to actually identify the cause.

    lastly, start with the simplest first. as jeff and cal mentioned, simple relocation of the controls can help alleviate stress on the median nerve.
    Last edited by monogod; 01-28-2008 at 09:07 AM.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  11. #11
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,436
    Quote Originally Posted by AntiLoc
    I used to ride with a 4 inch drop from my seat to my grips and I was fairly stretched out too. Now, my grips are about an inch drop from my seat and I brought the grips back almost two inches so that a lot more of my weight is supported by my saddle and my hands have little weight on them.
    exactly. too many xc bikes are set up "racer style" and while it may be conducive to racing a few laps it is not appropriate for many recreational riders. "racer style" requires significantly more core strength and is something that is worked up to, not started out on.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  12. #12
    (not that fast)
    Reputation: fastale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    969
    I too had this problem at one time. I personally believe that it was partly caused by my specialized "egro" gloves. The added gel for the outside of my palm forced me to put more weight on that portion of my hand, causing the nerve to get inflammed to the point where I couldn't use my hand. I couldn't hold anything that needed a grip or use my fingers for things like lighting a bic lighter. It sucked. Luckily my girlfriend was into massage therapy and researched how to get the swelling to go down. This along with anti-inflamatory drugs helped me to get full mobility back in my hand. I have since changed gloves and watch my riding position a lot closer. I haven't had the problem for about three years now. Good luck.

  13. #13
    Ride Everything
    Reputation: GRAVELBIKE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,403
    Quote Originally Posted by fastale
    I too had this problem at one time. I personally believe that it was partly caused by my specialized "egro" gloves. The added gel for the outside of my palm forced me to put more weight on that portion of my hand, causing the nerve to get inflammed to the point where I couldn't use my hand. I couldn't hold anything that needed a grip or use my fingers for things like lighting a bic lighter. It sucked. Luckily my girlfriend was into massage therapy and researched how to get the swelling to go down. This along with anti-inflamatory drugs helped me to get full mobility back in my hand. I have since changed gloves and watch my riding position a lot closer. I haven't had the problem for about three years now. Good luck.
    I had similar results with those SpecEd gloves. Absolutely hated them, and went back to my Lizard Skins Phoenix and Ergon gloves.
    GRAVELBIKE.COM - ride everything

  14. #14
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,436
    just goes to show theres no silver bullet for everyone. from either improper fit, anatomy/physiology, or personal biomechanics they didnt work for these guys (and probably many others out there); but thousands of people who are suffering from ulnar nerve irritation/compression find relief from the specialized bg gel glove and others like them. they certainly arent a panacea, but are a step in a comprehensive modality of pain cessation.

    just curious fastale... how did the gel cause you to put more weight on the outside of your palm?
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  15. #15
    (not that fast)
    Reputation: fastale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    969
    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    just goes to show theres no silver bullet for everyone. from either improper fit, anatomy/physiology, or personal biomechanics they didnt work for these guys (and probably many others out there); but thousands of people who are suffering from ulnar nerve irritation/compression find relief from the specialized bg gel glove and others like them. they certainly arent a panacea, but are a step in a comprehensive modality of pain cessation.

    just curious fastale... how did the gel cause you to put more weight on the outside of your palm?
    So picture your palm flat against the bar, then stick a lump of gel under one side. Despite the gel being soft, you're still putting a lump directly under the nerve. It seems to me that specialized should have put an equal amount of the gel accross that section of your palm. I hope this makes sense, I cannot create an image to show what I am getting at since I am at work and limited with what programs I have access to. Let me know if it doesn't make sense and I can take a picture when I get home.

    Also, just want to say that agree 100% with monogod that just because these gloves didn't work for me does not mean that they wont work for anyone else. I am generally very happy with specialized products (even though I am not a huge fan of their Body Geometry saddles).
    Last edited by fastale; 01-28-2008 at 11:35 AM.

  16. #16
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,436
    Quote Originally Posted by fastale
    So picture your palm flat against the bar, then stick a lump of gel under one side. Despite the gel being soft, you're still putting a lump directly under the nerve. It seems to me that specialized should have put an equal amount of the gel accross that section of your palm. I hope this makes sense, I cannot create an image to show what I am getting at since I am at work and limited with what programs I have access to. Let me know if it doesn't make sense and I can take a picture when I get home.
    not only do we sell the gloves, but i ride with them as well so im familiar with their construction. and as a nurse pursing a doctorate in sports physiology/kinesiology im somewhat familiar with the human body as well. thats why i asked how the gel caused you to put more weight on the outside of your palm.

    i could understand if the gel caused slightly more pressure on the outer heel over the guyon canal resultant to the placement of your hands on the bar and/or your particular grip, but not how it caused you to weight that area more.

    the gel insert is on the outer heel of the palm, which is outside of where the most direct pressure should be being placed. and there is corresponding padding in the heel of the palm below the thumb thus preventing an uneven lump across the heel of the palm. so it sounds like you might be riding with too much pressure on the heel of your palms. this could be caused by too long of a cockpit, too short of a cockpit, or too great of a discrepancy of bar to seat height relationship. fwiw, some of the bg gloves do have gel in the palm area as well.

    but again, as stated before they are no panacea so im not suggesting the fault is with you or your bike because the gloves are perfect, or that you are inherently wrong because in your experience they put more pressure on the guyon canal. although the basic structure is the same everybody's body is vastly and distinctly different, and the anatomy of your hand may vary in a manner not conducive to the bg gloves. im simply making an observation as a trained bike fitter in the field of cycling physiology/kinesiology.

    edit: that first paragraph sounds kinda like im being a richard, but it was not meant as derogatory. just some background info.
    Last edited by monogod; 01-28-2008 at 12:19 PM.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  17. #17
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,436
    Quote Originally Posted by fastale
    I am not a huge fan of their Body Geometry saddles.
    you added this after i responded to your last post. let me agree that in general i am not either, but they seem to work great for everyone around me! according to our ass-o-meter my sit bones are in between the 130 and 143 so i can seem to get quite comfy on them for rides over 50 miles or so. maybe i just need to get used to it, i dunno. they feel great for the first 45 miles or so. i wish they offered a 138, like my aliante twin flex carbon/ti, but alas they do not.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DesertDoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    60
    There is another aspect here that has not been addressed. I don't have much history to go on, but I can tell you from experience with my patients I have frequently seen numbness in the hands caused by prior trauma to the cervical region (neck).

    The nerves in the hands originate in the the neck area and travel to the extremity via some fairly complex connecting routes. It may be possible that there has been a trauma (Could be minor or major) in the neck area causing mild compression around one or more of the nerve roots which go to your hands.

    If the hand goes numb at other times, rather than just biking, I would suggest you find a local physician or Chiropractor who could provide a more comprehensive exam and diagnosis. This could aid in relieving the issue altogether rather than just trying to alleviate symptoms while you ride.

    I hope you find results. Discomfort while riding has driven many away from the sport. Don't let that ruin your passion.

  19. #19
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,436
    Quote Originally Posted by DesertDoc
    There is another aspect here that has not been addressed. I don't have much history to go on, but I can tell you from experience with my patients I have frequently seen numbness in the hands caused by prior trauma to the cervical region (neck).
    absolutely! excellent point!

    and also from crashes that have impacted the elbow as well. we've had people with numbness for months in their hands due to severe impact of the elbow as well as from crashes resulting in direct impacts on the humerus/acromion junction.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  20. #20
    (not that fast)
    Reputation: fastale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    969
    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    not only do we sell the gloves, but i ride with them as well so im familiar with their construction. and as a nurse pursing a doctorate in sports physiology/kinesiology im somewhat familiar with the human body as well. thats why i asked how the gel caused you to put more weight on the outside of your palm.

    i could understand if the gel caused slightly more pressure on the outer heel over the guyon canal resultant to the placement of your hands on the bar and/or your particular grip, but not how it caused you to weight that area more.
    I think that I might have used to wrong word when I said "weight." I think that "unequal pressure" or just "pressure point" in general would have given you a better mental picture

    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    the gel insert is on the outer heel of the palm, which is outside of where the most direct pressure should be being placed. so it sounds like you might be riding with too much pressure on the heel of your palms. this could be caused by too long of a cockpit, too short of a cockpit, or too great of a discrepancy of bar to seat height relationship. fwiw, some of the bg gloves do have gel in the palm area as well.
    You may be correct to say that I might ride with too much pressure on the heel of my palms, but even if this is the case why put the padding there if one shouldn't have their hand positioned like that to begin with? Also, like I brought up earlier, the padding is... say... 1/4 of an inch thick. that translates to that part of your hand contacting the bar 1/4" sooner than if you did not have padding. In other words the gloves are adding a weird contact point.

    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    but again, as stated before they are no panacea so im not suggesting the fault is with you or your bike because the gloves are perfect, or that you are inherently wrong because in your experience they put more pressure on the guyon canal. although the basic structure is the same everybody's body is vastly and distinctly different, and the anatomy of your hand may vary in a manner not conducive to the bg gloves. im simply making an observation as a trained bike fitter in the field of cycling physiology/kinesiology.
    very true

    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    edit: that first paragraph sounds kinda like im being a richard, but it was not meant as derogatory. just some background info.
    Not at all, friendly discussion.

  21. #21
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,436
    Quote Originally Posted by fastale
    You may be correct to say that I might ride with too much pressure on the heel of my palms
    and i may not. im not trying to be right here, just spit balling. it was just a suggestion based on your description of the relationship of your hand to the bars. but if that is the case, correcting your riding position would mean more comfort and efficiency and less likelyhood of injury.

    Quote Originally Posted by fastale
    but even if this is the case why put the padding there if one shouldn't have their hand positioned like that to begin with?
    because the hand is NOT supposed to be positioned there. thats the whole point.

    Quote Originally Posted by fastale
    the padding is... say... 1/4 of an inch thick. that translates to that part of your hand contacting the bar 1/4" sooner than if you did not have padding.
    there is comparable padding on the heel of the palm on the thumb side as well. not quite as thick as the gel insert over the guyon's canal, but enough so that it greatly reduces the discrepancy caused by the gel insert on the outer edge of the heel of the palm.

    Quote Originally Posted by fastale
    In other words the gloves are adding a weird contact point.
    or conversely are identifying an issue of improper hand placement, cockpit length, bar height, etc.

    or maybe its as simple as they just dont work for your hands!

    have you ever tried oury grips or wrapping your bars 2x or 3x with road tape? for guys with bigger hands, smaller grips can lead to improper contact with the bar and inappropriate weight placement on the palms. and if your riding position just is what it is it either will make placing your weight on the palms of your hands much more comfortable. (esp. the 2x/3x road tape)
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    44

    shoulder trauma?

    Have you smacked that shoulder recently? I landed on my left shoulder back in July. I was getting a numb left hand on & off for about 3 months after. Healed up just in time to land on the other shoulder..
    Aztech Frames
    Azonic/O'neal racing
    Avalanche DH Suspension
    http://s174.photobucket.com/albums/w...za/aztechshop/

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •