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  1. #1
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    My Flux so far, recent ride pic, first bad wreck/injury

    I've spent quite a bit of quality time on my Flux. I still really can't give an in depth review but I am defiantly having lots of fun on my bike.

    I've said this before but I will say it again I love the way the Flux descends. I'm defiantly more confident going down hill, and breaking my personal best top down hills speeds on the local trails. There were some technical down hills that I was afraid of. Note the past tense of the previous sentence. The longer wheel base is defiantly a good thing. When I decide to buy a good hard tail, length of wheel base is going to be something I will look at closely. I really like the longer wheel base on the flux . (keep in mind my previous bike was a Raleigh m80 that was too small for me)

    I had mentioned that I was having problems with log crossings. While still can't bunny hop them I am now able to get over them. At first I thought the longer wheel base of the Flux was making them more difficult. I was kind of right on this one. The longer wheel base was making it more difficult to clear them at slow speeds. I would tackle the biger logs at slower speeds on my other bike because going over them fast usually led to an endo. The bike as mention before was too small for me. The longer wheel base on the Flux has enabled me to take big logs at higher speeds. The longer wheel base makes the down side of the logs much easier to take so I am able to take them at higher speeds with confidence and no fear enduing. When I say higher speeds I am not talking about 20mphr. I am sure having rear suspension has helped as well.

    Climbing switch backs on the Flux is a totally different experience than on the Raleigh (I am not surprised) I feel like I am speeding up, or zipping right on up switch backs. Going down them seems to be going better to on the flux as well. I don't feel like I am going over my handle bars on the down side.

    The flux climbs pretty good when you have enough air pressure in the rear shock. I wasn't happy with the plushness of the rear shock so I let some air out. It had like a 155psi, I only weigh 135. I didn't realize until later that I had dropped the air pressure to 90 psi. I didn't realize it until a couple of rides later that the low air pressure in the rear made the bike not pedal as good. At least that is what I think was going on based on perceived empirical evidence. It just seemed like climbing was suddenly a lot harder on the bike. I thought I was getting weaker, I thought maybe I was riding too much and was just wearing my self down. It wasn’t until I road my road bike that I realized something was wrong with the flux. I just felt really good climbing on the road. My next ride on the flux I check the air pressure, and increased to 120 psi. After upping the air pressure I was able to climb just as before, only a little better. One expert racer told me that air pressure in the fox rp3 didn’t affect how well the bike pedal, only propedal setting mattered which is why I 1% of doubts what I have said above. Maybe you guys can shed some light on this discrepancy?

    After describing the way I handle logs on the Flux I am almost embarrassed to admit how I had my first big accident (hopefully the last big accident) on the Flux happened. Unfortunately when you go faster the falls tend to be harder. The accident occurred on a log pile that I had ridden at least a dozen times. This is a smooth log pile that you can just ride right over at any speed. I un-expectantly got some air and unfortunately came down head first into the ground. My helmet and my nose were broken in the accident. It is probably one of the worst accidents I have ever had on the bike. My sun glasses some how gashed my nose, it bleed like crazy and required 3 stitches to stop the bleeding. After 3 hours in the ER I got confirmation that my nose was broken as well. Every thing happened so fast I'm really not sure what went wrong. This happened about 3 weeks ago, I have since I have ridden the log pile again without incident.

    I have to say out of all of the injuries I could have had the broken nose has been the easiest to deal with. Very little pain and 0 time off the bike, in fact the pictures below are of a trip I took to Virginia to ride 3 days after the injury happened.

    The pictures are from Hickory ridge in Virginia. We also road at the IMBA Subaru explore park and peaksview. We had went to Virginia to ride Douthat, but were rained out.
    Sorry, no high flyin action shots, I am not into leaving the ground, just pictures of me on my bike







    Last edited by Single Track MTBer; 04-29-2006 at 08:46 PM.

  2. #2
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Quote Originally Posted by Single Track MTBer
    I still really can't give an in death review...
    And let's keep it that way.

    Glad yer diggin' it.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  3. #3
    Lay off the Levers
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    I just put an RP3 back on my Spot after being on a DHX-coil for almost a year. I inadvertantly was running way too low pressure even though the sag was not excessive. As it turns out it did not bob much but it climbed quite poorly compared to the coil. The problem was that even though it did not bob much at all... even in the PP(-)... the bike squatted like crazy on the climbs and the balance was way off. I was wheeling out too easily and had to drop the travel well below 125mm to keep the nose down. Additionally when standing and pedaling on techy climbs the bike felt uncontrolled and nervous.

    I was thinking I was just having trouble getting used to my new fork b/c I didn't realize what was going on at the back end.

    Today I decided to up the rear shock pressure back to what I had booked as correct a long time ago and all the problems went away. It climbed much better seated and standing. The squatty nervousness was greatly reduced. Of course there's the standard problem with getting full travel on the RP3 with the 5.0 rockers. The 5.3 set apparently solves this. I also have read the larger DHX-A sleeve can help, but I have no experience with it.

    Heal well, heal quick, enjoy!
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  4. #4
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    Sorry about he poor profreading job. Corrections made

    Bikezilla
    I don't know if what you describe is what was going on with my bike, but very well could of been. Seems like the solution was the same though. I have a lot to learn about air shocks.

    When I let some of the air out of the RP3 I didn't realize how much I had let out, it was never my intention to drop the air pressure to 90. I guess now know what happens when you have too little air pressure in the shock. I made the mistake of adjusting the air pressure in my reba without setting the u-turn to full travel as a result I lost travel on the fork. I had to let all of the air out of the pos and neg chambers and refil to get full travel again.

    Thanks for the explanation, I feel confident the lack of air pressure was the problem.

  5. #5
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    Glad you're OK!
    I had my own brush with death yesterday. I accelerated into a rough DH area and had my bars rotate down in the stem. Apparently the bolts had been working loose and when I pointed down hill they turned so that I couldn't steer well or use the brakes. Fortunately the bail only left me with a scratched up arm and a sore leg. Whew!

    FYI on the Reba. I do have a friend who has a fixed travel Reba on a Burner who doesn't get all the travel out of it. The U-Turn doesn't seem to have that problem though.
    Big hoopy.
    Turner Sultan / On One Inbred

  6. #6
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Single Track MTBer
    The longer wheel base is defiantly a good thing. When I decide to buy a good hard tail, length of wheel base is going to be something I will look at closely.
    All the more reason to check out a 29"er!

    Anyway, interesting "non-in depth" review of the Flux. Sounds like you're really enjoying the benefits of full suspension, and a properly fitting bike.

    I took my Flux out yesterday for the first time in a over a month (not to worry, I've been on the 5 Spot, 29" hardtail, CX bike, and road bike plenty in the meantime), and was wowed once again with it's handling. The trails were pretty rock strewn, but with the Flux I could "slice 'n' dice" around a lot of them, as opposed to plowing over everything on the 5 Spot. And when I did air it out (intentionally or otherwise), the Flux remained well mannered. All in all a good reminder of how much fun the Flux can be, especially on relatively smoother trails, such as many of the ones I have ridden in VA.
    A government big enough to give you everything you want is a government big enough to take from you everything you have.

  7. #7
    gravity curmudgeon
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    Ouch to the wreck/injuries. Broke my nose a few times in the student-athlete trenches of those high school through college years. The last time even sort of straightened it.

    Can't say much to the RP3 pressure and climbing other than I find I need correct air pressure (a rather narrow range, in my experience) for the bike to feel right and handle right. I can make round pedal strokes on most anything, but if the bike isn't working right as a whole, well ... it sux.

    I too love the flux for climbing. A long time back a pro mtb xc racer told me one of his tips about climbing (probably given that he was tired of waiting long periods for me on climbs): you can always climb one gear harder. Well, the flux is fine for easy spins on climbs (probably not different from bikes like the spot or even rfx), but if the legs and lungs are up to the task, notch it up (more is merrier) and get a good cadence going on the flux and the bike switches to rocket mode. It almost seems easier to pedal at that point.

  8. #8
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    The problem with my u-turn came from not following the instructions. I confident that has been resolved.

    I like 29ers, I like the concept but at 5'4" I think it would be too big of bike for me. I don't like the idea of the funcky geomtry it would take to make one fit me. I probably will never have a 5 inch travel bike either, I think to get the correct standover height I would have to get too small of a frame (I'm talking lenght wise) People that I ride with that have 29ers have talked about how 26 inch bikes were just too small and to get the bike fited they had to have too big of frame, or knees would hit the handle bars. These are people in the 6' and up catagorey. I am glad that a product has been developed for bigger people, I might bring more people into the sport. I think 29ers are not for everyone. That is just my 2 cents worth, not trying to start a 29er debate.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Single Track MTBer
    I like 29ers, I like the concept but at 5'4" I think it would be too big of bike for me. ...I think 29ers are not for everyone. That is just my 2 cents worth, not trying to start a 29er debate.
    No arguments here. My wife is your height and rides an XS XCE. I'm not sure if a 29"er (or a 5 Spot) would be for her, but I would like for her to be able to try one to know for sure. Of course there are even shorter riders on 29"ers, but it does start to get complicatd at that point.

    I would never have guessed you were 5' 4" from the pics. It's hard to get a good perspective from the front, but you look pretty well proportioned to the bike. Kind of like a taller rider on a 29"er.
    A government big enough to give you everything you want is a government big enough to take from you everything you have.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by miles e
    No arguments here. My wife is your height and rides an XS XCE. I'm not sure if a 29"er (or a 5 Spot) would be for her, but I would like for her to be able to try one to know for sure. Of course there are even shorter riders on 29"ers, but it does start to get complicatd at that point.

    I would never have guessed you were 5' 4" from the pics. It's hard to get a good perspective from the front, but you look pretty well proportioned to the bike. Kind of like a taller rider on a 29"er.
    I think I am probably just a touch under 5'5". The flux is a medium btw.

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