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Thread: L5 S1 merging

  1. #1
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    L5 S1 merging

    While like most I've had mostly superficial injuries due to off bike excursions I'm presently contemplating getting back to riding after having to sit out a couple years due to a blown disk. Greastest concern is to start riding again and have more damage that may come back to haunt me later. But given I'm 39 and can't stand the impact of other aerobic training (running), never like doing the gym thing and gotta start getting some cardio and real excercise I'm headed back for the trails. As a HT rider who never ridden a FS XC bike before and given the back problems I plan to purchase a new full suspension bike, I need help on getting the right size frame that will give me bike control but not stretch me out to far over the bars. Any help is appreciated. Height is 6'.

    dirt is good
    killgunter

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by killgunter
    But given I'm 39 and can't stand the impact of other aerobic training (running), never like doing the gym thing and gotta start getting some cardio and real excercise I'm headed back for the trails.



    I'm 5'11", 150 lbs. 58. Scoliosis, multiple herniated degenerated discs (S1), facet arthropathy, stenosis, foraminal narrowing, sciatica, blah blah. Walking isn't fun, and running is out of the question because a heelstrike goes right up the spine. I bike xc hard on smoother trails with a suspension post. Can sprint and climb quite well but not hammer for long at all; I'm a spinner now.

    Off the bike, I jump rope. Not only is it the most aerobic of exercises (more so than running due to arm motion), it is knee- and back-friendly (knees don't bend much; shock is largely absorbed due to upright posture and feet and leg flexion). Also, it is tremendously fun (raging endorphins) and can be done safely at home in any season for the price of a good rope.

    Jumping will not strengthen quads; it is not beneficial for biking strength. If you have weight probloem, jumping will solve that quickly (1/2 hour every other day).

    Put on some good music and try it ( I use reggae). Smoke it and jump it, mon. Your jump rope will be your friend for life.

    Best wishes.



    http://www.jumprope.com/cgi-bin/Soft...278+1137182358

  3. #3
    aka Dick Dangle
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    When I Boxed My Trainer would say a ten min.Jump rope would = to a three mile run.
    But dont jump on cement it will give You Shinsplints!!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by it hurts
    When I Boxed My Trainer would say a ten min.Jump rope would = to a three mile run.
    But dont jump on cement it will give You Shinsplints!!

    Very interesting; thanks! I jump best on wood but will put down a piece of cardboard outside if I have to. Jumped 45 mins. last night to one of my old reggae tapes, a lot of Jimmy Cliff and Bob Marley. Been jumping for 30 years and have yet to be injured--I doubt I could say that if I were running. Can't wait to go again.

  5. #5
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    Find a good bike shop, they'll be able to suggest which bike brand will fit your build.

    Look at bikes with 5-inches of travel. The ride will be plush and the current technolgy allows the bike to be efficient and fairly light (< 30 pounds).

    I rode hardtails for 20 years before I went to full suspension, I've got a Santa Cruz Heckler and I couldn't be happier. It's set up to ride aggresive XC, with 5+ inches of travel front and rear the bumps just disappear. Check out the Santa Cruz forum, you will find many satisfied Heckler owners.

  6. #6
    I'm a dog person
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    I have a Haro VL120. 5" travel. 25.5#. Very efficient. Absolutely love it.
    "It is the glory of God to conceal a matter; to search out a matter is the glory of kings."

  7. #7
    bikerbert
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    If you strengthen your butt/hip/pelvic stabilization muscles, you've got a chance. I've worked with someone who had herniated discs, and he went from only being able to walk to doing big hill climbs.

    All we did was work on the muscles along his spinal column, lower abdomen, glutes and hips. Now, what worked with him is by no means applicable across the board, but I'd ask a doctor about this approach to see if it would apply to your situation.

  8. #8
    bikerbert
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    If you strengthen your butt/hip/pelvic stabilization muscles, you've got a chance. I've worked with someone who had herniated discs, and he went from only being able to walk to doing big hill climbs.

    All we did was work on the muscles along his spinal column, lower abdomen, glutes and hips. Now, what worked with him is by no means applicable across the board, but I'd ask a doctor about this approach to see if it would apply to your situation.

  9. #9
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    Ride

    I had a herniated L5/S1 when I was 38, which was 20 years ago. Did not ride for 10 years, but then started road riding again. Almost immediately it started making my back feel better. The bent forward riding position, I believe, opens the disc space at the rear of the vertebrae where the disc bulge and nerve pressure occurs. A couple of years later I started mountain biking and have been at it ever since. I have never had a back problem from riding, and many times I have gone riding when the back was acting up and by the time the ride was over it felt much better. I find that a more stetched out riding position helps, and I maintain a position on my MTBs almost like a road bike, including long bar ends that let me really stretch out when the going isnīt too rough. I ride both FS and a hardtail with a suspension post, it doesnīt make much differecne. I would also point out that in contrast to the relief I get from riding, swimming, which I did seriously for years before and after the herniation, aggravated my back problems (I also have facet syndrome due to the reduced disc space); swimming tends to increase lordosis, the curvature toward the rear which is the opposite of what riding does. No matter what else you do, do those back stretches and ab exercises religiously, especially the abs, they are what stabilize your spine. Good luck.

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