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  1. #1
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    Knee worn out, is it possible to ride with braces?

    I had no ligaments in my left knee for 20 years because of a Motorcycle accident.
    It has been unstable , but apart from that , no pain.
    Its the back and forth movement that its loose.

    For the past month, lots of cracking and pain and feels more unstable.
    Went to the Dr he took XRays and he said , my knee is worn out.
    Nothing to do. (he treated me like a patiente with a terminal desease.
    Thats it, gave anti inflamatory for 2 weeks (knee was never swollen) and those havent helped at all.

    Any advice you guys can give me?
    Riding my Mt bike hurts but not so much, dirt bike doesnt hurt, but walking hurts.

    Is it possible to ride Mt bike with a knee brace?

  2. #2
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    Reputation: rdhfreethought's Avatar
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    Google is wonderful: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...reconstruction

    First, I do you really you have no ligaments left in your knee. The mechanism of injury usually tears (for example) one of the two cruciate ligaments (ACL/PCL) since anterior motion will cause one to tear, and the other to slacken, avoiding injury.

    First, you need to know what damage there was. Here is what you do:
    1. Get a copy of your MRI report (the one with the radiologists interpretation)
    2. Get a decent Family Medicine doc. They will be your advocate, and be able to explain things, and talk to the othopedists for you to get what YOU need, not what 90% of 70 yr old folks with bad knees need.
    3. Weigh your options and decide. Basic rule of thumb is that surgery outcomes get better every year (lots of new technology and techniques just like bikes). Problem is you dont want to wait until you are too old to enjoy riding.
    Regional Race Manager, Knolly Bikes
    Washington State, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa
    ~~~KNOLLY KNATION RACING~~~

  3. #3
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    Check out non-surgical treatments such as Synvisc, Orthovisc or even better, Prolotherapy.

    Beware of NSAIDs, they will relieve your pain but accelerate joint degeneration according to published medical studies.

    Avoid surgery because of the deadly MRSA epidemic. I lost one friend to it after a hip replacement and it nearly took another after knee surgery. Many patients are less than satisfied with their knee replacements. Surgery is a last resort.

    If you are over 40 look into Bio-identical Hormone Replacement Therapy.

    If you are a runner, stop running.

  4. #4
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    Sure you can ride with a brace. But it won't be very comfortable. And you shouldn't need to.

    Here's my experience with knee injuries (NOTE: I am not a doctor): In 1986 I hyper-extended my knee in a skiing accident. That partially tor my ACL. I got a brace then made by CTI. I wore it while skiing to keep my knee stable, it did a good job. I'm sure there's better braces being made now. In 2001 I completely tore the ACL in that knee while screwing around at my kids soccer practice. I wasn't wearing the brace when it happened. So, I had surgery to replace the ACL. It worked out great, my knee is very stable and I haven't worn the brace since for any activity. But what can happen when you have an unstable knee is you can damage and tear the meniscus (cartilage) much easier than if your knee is stable. That's probably the cause of your pain now. To my knowledge, there is no surgery commonly available to replace mensicus. They can cut away and remove the torn portions which can help to relive pain and "clicking", but they can't replace it. When I had my ACL surgery, they cleaned up the torn meniscus too. That took care of the pain I had prior to the surgery that I'd get just from walking. But if I run or jog for any distance, my knee kills me because I'm missing that meniscus.

    So, I'd advise finding a good orthopedic surgeon, get an MRI done (an x-ray won't do) and discuss your options with him or her. Bicycling is excellent therapy for your knees, too. It builds up the muscles around your knees which helps to keep them stable and is low impact.

  5. #5
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    Find a sports medicine doctor. My limited experience with orthopedic DR is they will blow you off if they don't see enough potential $$$. I've seen great results from the sports medicine facility attached to the university athletics department here. They are interested in more than just doing high dollar surgery.
    Oh sh!+ just force upgraded to cat1. Now what?
    Best thing about an ultra marathon? I just get to ride my bike for X hours!

  6. #6
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    Question about knees? Ask the Wherewolf. http://arnica.csustan.edu/mtbike/

  7. #7
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    worn out knee

    i have had 3 acl replacments 2 left knee(1st done in 80s that wore out)and the others 2 years a apart, whilst waiting for operations and during recovery i purchased a good knee brace ( 80-$160) and rode very comfortably with this including holidays to the french alps and moab both of which were 2 weeks long,so i reckon a good brace is the only way round your dilema

  8. #8
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    Knee braces

    Quote Originally Posted by SPINSTOKED
    Question about knees? Ask the Wherewolf. http://arnica.csustan.edu/mtbike/
    It depends on what you mean by "knee braces". I rode with knee braces on both knees for about 5 years. And since I'm allergic to neoprene, I had some really cheap ones. I find it hard to believe you have no ligaments. X-rays don't diagnose soft tissue problems very well, and Synvisc and similar substances are for cartilage wear. Your diagnosis sounds a bit too vague, "worn out"? Not exactly a very precise diagnosis. I'd get more information from a good orthopedist before proceeding.

  9. #9
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    knee braces

    The brace I purchased was a Mueller Hg 80 which was recommended by an orthopaedic surgeon and is used by skiers.
    In the 80s I had a gortex ACL graft which after 20yrs wore out causing the knee to become unstable and subsequently had a ACL graft from my patella. Ive been wearing the brace for the last 2 yrs to support and stabilise during exercise and cycling.
    I have always received excellent orthopaedic advice and treatment as I have been able to successfully rehab from all surgery and keep riding to a high level.

  10. #10
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    Careful !

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Duende
    Check out non-surgical treatments such as Synvisc, Orthovisc or even better, Prolotherapy.

    Beware of NSAIDs, they will relieve your pain but accelerate joint degeneration according to published medical studies.

    Avoid surgery because of the deadly MRSA epidemic. I lost one friend to it after a hip replacement and it nearly took another after knee surgery. Many patients are less than satisfied with their knee replacements. Surgery is a last resort.

    If you are over 40 look into Bio-identical Hormone Replacement Therapy.

    If you are a runner, stop running.
    I must act as voice of reason on this topic and counterpoint some of DD's thoughts.
    First, you have an obvious and significant instability if both the ACL and PCL are "missing". Prolotherapy in a nut shell is an injection of an irritant cocktail that will cause scar tissue to form about a joint. Prolotherapy works well for some areas of the body when you have partial tearing or in an area where the joint is so small that scar tissue can reach each side of the joint to stabilize it (think small bones in mid foot). Prolotherapy is not intended or useful in an application in which you describe as the joint surfaces are not meant to scar down. The knee is not a pure hinge joint, some movement across the Tibial Plateau has to occur to allow the arthrokinematics of the joint to function.
    Prolo works well with MCL's but does not work for completely torn ACL's and PCL's as therer is typically nothing remaining after months, and especially years, after tears. Your body will essentially absorb the dead ligaments so that nothing is typically present. For this reason there will be nothing to stabilize the knee using Prolo.

    As far as NSAID's go, it is not wise to use them in the proliferation phase of hearling (typically 2-6 weeks). If you had an injury and wanted it to heal correctly you would likely not want to use them in this phase because it retards collegen synthesis, thus the healing process. You on the other hand are chronic, there is really nothing healing in the joint, just inflammatin to control. If NSAID's work well to control pain and swelling then you should use them (given no GI issues).

    Synvisc and Orthovisc
    Both of these substances are marketed to be true cartilage. The problems that arise are the fact that hystologically it is not cartilage, but more like scar tissue in its composition.
    Furthermore, numerous insurance companies view this as elective and will not cover the process.
    If you were relatively young, of normal weight, and did not have the instabillities in the knee you may be a great candidate for the injections. Unfortnately, due to your instability you are only placing the band aid on the broken leg. The issue is that the joint is unstable and keeps sliding/grinding over the joint surfaces causing your degeneration.

    As far as MRSA goes, yes it has become a problem, but I think that DD uses his personal anecdotes to sway you. I have seen many patients come and go and only a small percentage of them have issues with MRSA. You are probably less likely to have issues with MRSA than being struck by lightning.

    As far as having the knee replacement, it comes down to your personal decision. If the pain and dysfunction of the current knee is not allowing you to live a functional life than it may be right for you. If you can deal with the pain and ride with braces, which I don't think support much due to soft tissue, then that is for you.
    It is all relative. I have seen many patients that state the pain is significantly less the day after the surgery than it was the day before.
    That being said, I have seen my fair share of knees that have had issues wtih scar tissue build up, infections, and hardware issues as well. I will say that the majority of patients having replacements are quite satisfied with them.

    Good luck with your decision, I hope this has helped some.
    BoiseBoy

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